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Fillmore Ca

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1994 | DARYL KELLEY and SCOTT HADLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They have been the backbone of Fillmore for decades. Passing their shops from father to son, they have kept their main street alive. Together they've preserved a slice of small-town Americana so pleasant movie crews flock there to recapture an era lost to tract homes and shopping malls. But now, with their grit tested to the limit, some business owners on downtown Fillmore's Central Avenue say they don't know if they can ever recoup what they lost two weeks ago.
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NEWS
February 2, 1994 | DARYL KELLEY and SCOTT HADLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They have been the backbone of this town for decades. Passing their shops from father to son, they have kept their main street alive. Together they have preserved a slice of small-town Americana so pleasant that movie crews flock there to recapture an era lost to tract homes and shopping malls. But now, with their grit tested to the limit, some business owners on downtown Fillmore's Central Avenue say they don't know if they can ever recoup what they lost two weeks ago.
NEWS
January 21, 1994 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disaster relief offices opened in Simi Valley and Fillmore on Thursday, and hundreds of earthquake victims began applying for tens of millions of dollars in government aid as Ventura County started to rebuild from its most costly disaster in history. Staggering from $1 billion in damage countywide, earthquake victims showed up at daybreak for a 1 p.m. opening of the Simi Valley center to apply for loans and grants to repair or replace crumpled homes and businesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1994 | FRED ALVAREZ and SCOTT HADLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Building inspectors stepped over heaps of rubble and glass shards Tuesday to canvass the city's showcase old business district, trying to determine the structural safety of the turn-of-the-century shops. As shopkeepers waited nervously behind yellow police tape, inspectors concluded each tour of the red brick and masonry buildings by attaching a colored tag: green if the structure was safe, red if there was significant structural damage. Jesse Segovia's Fillmore Market had one of the red tags.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1993 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The group includes a few mechanics. A butcher. A tractor salesman. A minister and a city councilman. By profession it's an eclectic bunch. But they share one hobby--firefighting. Established in 1914, the 20-member Fillmore Volunteer Fire Department is one of the few volunteer stations in Southern California to flourish as other cities have turned to professional firefighting teams. Among Ventura County cities, Santa Paula also uses volunteers to augment a small full-time force.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1992 | DAVID GRITTEN
It wasn't so long ago that La Brea Avenue in Los Angeles was nothing but a long line of citrus groves. It was a warm, slow-moving, peaceful street, and not a lot happened there. Then in January, 1918, a young man called Charles Chaplin--who had arrived in Los Angeles just four years earlier from a seedy part of London, and rapidly became the biggest name in silent movies--opened his own movie studio on La Brea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1991
A mountain lion from the suburban wilds of the San Fernando Valley regained her freedom Saturday in a Ventura County forest, but state wildlife officials say a pair of big cats are still prowling around Fillmore. State Department of Fish and Game wardens released the 70-pound female lion in a remote, unpopulated portion of Los Padres National Forest after she was captured Friday in a condominium complex in Chatsworth.
NEWS
May 6, 1989 | MEG SULLIVAN, Times Staff Writer
The threat of toxic fumes from a fire at a garden store forced 5,000 residents of this Ventura County farming community from their homes overnight, but they returned early Friday morning after the blaze had nearly burned itself out. Authorities are investigating the possibility of arson in the fire, which leveled Dewey's Garden Center and caused $250,000 damage as nearly half of the city's 11,000 residents were evacuated. A few spots still smoldered in the blackened rubble Friday as firefighters stood back, waiting for the fire, which was fueled by pesticides, herbicides and swimming pool supplies, to extinguish itself.
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