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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Miles Teller almost died a few years ago. After spending a few days at a Connecticut music festival, he and two buddies were road tripping home to Florida. Cruising down the highway at 75 mph, Teller's friend tried to switch lanes and nearly hit another vehicle. He jerked the steering wheel back but lost control of the car, which went across three lanes of traffic, into a grass median, and flipped seven times. Teller was thrown 25 feet and awoke covered in blood. "I still have two rocks in my face," the boyish 23-year-old actor said, showing off scars on his chin, neck and shoulder.
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NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
Actress Scarlett Johansson topped the box office charts last weekend playing the character of Black Widow in the Marvel superhero flick "Captain America: The Winter Soldier. " That same weekend she was on screen as a man-eater of a different type in the cryptic indie sci-fi film "Under the Skin. " As a space alien in human form who lures male victims into a mysterious black void, Johansson gives a performance at once sinister, sultry and unexpectedly sympathetic. If "Captain America" was the latest product of a studio franchise machine, "Under the Skin" was the handcrafted result of writer-director Jonathan Glazer's 10-year quest to bring a singular experience to the screen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
"Frozen," the hit Disney animated musical about a girl who tries to save her kingdom and her ice-powered sister, has become the latest Hollywood movie to rile conservative commentators, with one pastor criticizing the film for indoctrinating homosexuality and bestiality in children. On the talk show Generations Radio, Kevin Swanson and his co-host, Steve Vaughn, took Disney to task for "leading the charge" in promoting a "pro-homosexual" agenda in "Frozen. " Swanson and Vaughn referred to posts by Steven D. Greydanus for the National Catholic Register and Gina Luttrell for the liberal PolicyMic -- the former of which critiques "Frozen's" alleged gay message (the commentators agree with this one)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Claire Noland
Mary Anderson, a redheaded actress who auditioned for the part of Scarlett O'Hara in the 1939 epic "Gone With the Wind" but wound up playing a supporting role as Maybelle Merriwether, died Sunday. She was 96. A longtime resident of Brentwood, Anderson died under hospice care in Burbank. She had been in declining health and had suffered a series of small strokes, said her longtime friend Betty Landess. Anderson was one of the last surviving cast members of the film adaptation of Margaret Mitchell's Civil War novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Geoff Boucher; Chris Lee; Mark Olsen; Rachel Abramowitz; Scott Timberg; Patrick Day; Kenneth Turan
The 25 best L.A. films of the last 25 years "Los ANGELES isn't a real city," people have said, "it just plays one on camera." It was a clever line once upon a time, but all that has changed. Los Angeles is the most complicated community in America -- make no mistake, it is a community -- and over the last 25 years, it has been both celebrated and savaged on the big screen with amazing efficacy. Damaged souls and flawless weather, canyon love and beach city menace, homeboys and credit card girls, freeways and fedoras, power lines and palm trees . . . again and again, moviegoers all over the world have sat in the dark and stared up at our Los Angeles, even if it was one populated by corrupt cops or a jabbering cartoon rabbit.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2006 | By Scott Collins, Times Staff Writer
Don Knotts, the saucer-eyed, scarecrow-thin comic actor best known for his roles as the high-strung small-town deputy Barney Fife on the 1960s CBS series "The Andy Griffith Show" and the leisure-suit-clad landlord Ralph Furley on ABC's '70s sitcom "Three's Company," has died. He was 81. Knotts, who lived in West Los Angeles, died Friday night of lung cancer at UCLA Medical Center, according to Sherwin Bash, his longtime manager. Family members said that his longtime friend Griffth was one of his last visitors at Cedars on Friday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2011 | By Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times
Heading into Sunday's Academy Awards, "Exit Through the Gift Shop" is undoubtedly the most buzzed-about film in the documentary feature category. But the uncomfortable question persists: Is it real? The movie is anchored by two of the least reliable narrators in memory: Banksy, the anonymous British street artist; and Thierry Guetta, an eccentric French émigré to Los Angeles whose obsessive filming happens to capture the world of high-concept graffiti. In alternating interviews, the two recount the rise of anti-establishment vandals into the upper echelons of the art world, where their work quickly became commodified.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Meg James
With one of its two big fish gone, BermanBraun has changed its name to Whalerock Industries. The Santa Monica TV production and digital media company, owned by veteran media executive Lloyd Braun, made the announcement Friday.  Braun's founding partner, Gail Berman, cut bait late last month, prompting a name change for the company that employs 150 people. ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Braun separately announced that he has elevated Andrew Mittman to run the company's newly combined film and scripted TV divisions.  Mittman has been in charge of the firm's small film unit since 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film critic
"Le Week-End" is a sour and misanthropic film masquerading as an honest and sensitive romance. A painful and unremittingly bleak look at a difficult marriage, it wants us to sit through a range of domestic horrors without offering much of anything as a reward. This is especially disheartening because on an abstract level the film's participants on both sides of the camera are talented individuals with strong resumes. Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan, who star as the unhappy couple, are two of Britain's top actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Adapted for the big screen from the History Channel miniseries "The Bible," the new film "Son of God" is essentially a feature-length recut of the second half of the series, based on the New Testament. The reedited nature of the movie, which tells the story of Jesus from his birth through his preaching, crucifixion and resurrection, might explain why many film critics are saying "Son of God" feels more like a greatest-hits compilation than a cohesive work. In a review for The Times, Martin Tsai writes , "to its credit, 'Son of God' proves more than a mere watered-down 'The Passion of the Christ.' The epic proportions of the miniseries hold up well on the big screen, save for the digitally composed establishing shots of Jerusalem.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Nicholas Meyer, the screenwriter, novelist and "Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan" director, has sold his Pacific Palisades house for $5.407 million. The two-story Cliff May-designed home, built in 1937, centers on a tree-shaded flagstone courtyard and sits on more than three-quarters of an acre. Among original details in the 8,222 square feet of living space are archways, decorative ironwork on the stairway banister, the stairwell chandelier, bay windows, three wood-burning fireplaces and beamed ceilings.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Daniel Miller and John Horn
Melvin Mar's entrée to Hollywood was far from glamorous. As an unpaid intern for "Platoon" producer Arnold Kopelson, Mar was responsible for fetching his boss' lunch of matzo ball soup every day. Mar calculated to the minute how long it would take to walk from the production company's Century City offices to the Stage Deli nearby, buy the soup and decant it into a bowl on Kopelson's desk, still piping hot, at precisely 1 p.m. Mar parlayed...
TRAVEL
April 6, 2014
ENGLAND Presentation Actress and writer Diz White will discuss how she came to write her travel humor book "Cotswolds Memoir: Discovering a Beautiful Region of Britain on a Quest to Buy a 17th Century Cottage. " When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220. HIKING Workshop Linda Mulally will share tips on hiking and backpacking with your dog. When, where: 7 p.m. Tuesday at the REI store in Santa Monica, 402 Santa Monica Blvd.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Amid ongoing controversy over its killer whale shows, SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. reported a 13% drop in attendance for the first three months of the year. The attendance numbers were included in a notice to the Securities and Exchange Commission that SeaWorld was buying 1.75 million of its own shares from private equity firm Blackstone Group. The notice said attendance for the quarter that ended March 31 dropped to about 3.05 million visitors from 3.5 million in the same period in 2013.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Mark Stock, a painter known for his evocative portraits of white-gloved butlers and sad, stylish women in slinky gowns, has died. He was 62. Stock, who died Wednesday at an Oakland hospital, had an enlarged heart, his publicist Charlotte Parker said. His most famous painting, "The Butler's in Love - Absinthe," a study of a butler scrutinizing a lipstick smear on an empty glass, inspired a short David Arquette film, "The Butler's in Love" (2008). It is one of more than 100 Stock paintings featuring butlers, often in poses suggesting suppressed longing or brooding disappointment.
TRAVEL
March 30, 2014
ART Presentation Artist Barbara Roth will show you techniques for drawing and painting while traveling and will discuss what art supplies to pack. You'll also learn how to paint from your travel photos. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220. MT. WHITNEY Workshop Kurt Wedberg will offer tips for gear and trip planning and show detailed slides of various approaches.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2013 | By Susan King
British actress Vivien Leigh had that undefinable star quality. For 30 years, the exquisitely beautiful Leigh captivated film and theater audiences with her well-crafted, magnetic performances. In fact, Leigh won lead actress Oscars for creating two of the most indelible characters in screen history - the strong-willed, manipulative Southern belle Scarlett O'Hara in the beloved 1939 Civil War epic, "Gone With the Wind," and Tennessee Williams' fragile, faded Southern beauty Blanche DuBois in 1951's "A Streetcar Named Desire.
TRAVEL
December 12, 2010
PHOTOGRAPHY Workshop Bring your digital camera and owner's manual and learn about your camera's basic functions and how to shoot better pictures. When, where: 6 p.m. Tuesday, at the REI store in Arcadia, 214 N. Santa Anita Ave. Admission, info: $20 for REI members; $40 for others. (626) 447-1062
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By David Colker
Lorenzo Semple Jr. was one of the hottest screenwriters in Hollywood in the 1970s and '80s, working on star-studded films such as "Papillon," with Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman; "Three Days of the Condor," headlined by Robert Redford; and "Never Say Never Again," Sean Connery's last movie as James Bond. But, rare in the trade, Semple didn't much mind if he was not the sole writer on a film. "Almost all the good scripts I've been involved in, I've been fired off of for one reason or another," he said in a 2011 video interview conducted by the Writers Guild Foundation.
OPINION
March 25, 2014
Re "Spotlight on film safety," March 22 The father of Sarah Jones, who was killed last month after being struck by a train during a film shoot in Georgia, told me he prays that his daughter's death will not be in vain. He said no film or TV show is worth the risk she faced. I write these words on a Saturday morning while many film workers are driving home after another 14- or 15-hour shift. We call this "Fraturday," a Friday film shoot that often extends into the wee hours of Saturday.
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