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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010
The festival of green screen that is "Bitch Slap" is surely intended to be a fond tribute to any number of hot-women-in-peril movies. Think Zack Snyder meets Roger Corman. Meets Christopher Nolan. Seriously. But when it offers only scant humor (and costumes) and interminable girl-fighting, isn't that actually just another entry in the genre? There is a plot, for those who look beyond the belles and whistling, but it has something to do with buried treasure and the CIA and other stuff like that, in a structure borrowed from "Memento," so the less said, the better.
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TRAVEL
April 27, 2014
PAPUA NEW GUINEA Slide show Pierre Odier will share his insights on Papua New Guinea, one of the last places where primitive man can still be seen in his natural Stone Age environment. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220. WOMEN Workshop Hostelling International will conduct a workshop for women interested in traveling alone. Topics to be covered include health and safety.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Geoff Boucher; Chris Lee; Mark Olsen; Rachel Abramowitz; Scott Timberg; Patrick Day; Kenneth Turan
The 25 best L.A. films of the last 25 years "Los ANGELES isn't a real city," people have said, "it just plays one on camera." It was a clever line once upon a time, but all that has changed. Los Angeles is the most complicated community in America -- make no mistake, it is a community -- and over the last 25 years, it has been both celebrated and savaged on the big screen with amazing efficacy. Damaged souls and flawless weather, canyon love and beach city menace, homeboys and credit card girls, freeways and fedoras, power lines and palm trees . . . again and again, moviegoers all over the world have sat in the dark and stared up at our Los Angeles, even if it was one populated by corrupt cops or a jabbering cartoon rabbit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Chris Lee
The 2014 Tribeca Film Festival audience has spoken. And at wrap party Saturday for the Heineken Audience Awards in New York City,  festival entries in the feature film and documentary categories were celebrated with top honors (as well as a pair of $25,000 cash prizes). “ Chef ,” an indie drama starring, written and directed by Jon Favreau -- best known for mega-budget studio fare such as “Iron Man 2” and “Cowboys & Aliens” -- landed TFF's Narrative Award for best feature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Hideko Takamine, a child star in Japan in the 1930s who became one of her country's leading screen actresses during the post- World War II era, in which she played a variety of contemporary women who captured the tenor of the times, has died. She was 86. FOR THE RECORD: Hideko Takamine: In the Jan. 5 LATExtra section, the caption for a photo that appeared with the obituary of Japanese actress Hideko Takamine misspelled the name of the actor with whom she was pictured. He was Eijiro, not Fijiro, Tono.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2009 | By KENNETH TURAN, Film Critic
"The Road" is a road you'll wish hadn't been taken. Not because anything's been badly done, but because there's a serious imbalance in the complicated equation between what the film forces us to endure and what we end up receiving in return. Given that it's based on Cormac McCarthy's somber novel, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for a devastating report from the end of the world witnessed by a man who's been there, it's no surprise that the film is for the most part profoundly depressing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2010 | By Dennis Lim
Gillo Pontecorvo's "Kapò," a concentration-camp drama from 1959, is neither a great nor a terrible movie, but it has a special place in the history of Holocaust films (and of film criticism). It is a flash point in a long-running debate -- one that surrounds films as different as "Schindler's List" and "Inglourious Basterds" -- about the responsibilities and the limitations of cinema when it comes to depicting a historical atrocity. "Kapò" is being released this week on DVD through Criterion's Essential Art House line, which offers no-frills editions of titles from the company's back catalog at a reduced price ($19.
TRAVEL
December 12, 2010
PHOTOGRAPHY Workshop Bring your digital camera and owner's manual and learn about your camera's basic functions and how to shoot better pictures. When, where: 6 p.m. Tuesday, at the REI store in Arcadia, 214 N. Santa Anita Ave. Admission, info: $20 for REI members; $40 for others. (626) 447-1062
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2011 | Susan King
The late Glenn Ford's 8,800-square-foot Beverly Hills mansion has a curious octagon shape that had just one official bedroom -- a huge master bedroom on the main floor. "There are very few right angles in this house," said his only child, 66-year-old Peter Ford, who has lived there with his wife, Lynda, for the last 17 years. They moved in 12 years before Ford's death in 2006 at age 90 to take care of the ailing actor. "The reason was, he didn't want to be fenced in. This house is kind of a metaphor for his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Most remakes of classic films are shadows of the originals. But Joel and Ethan Coen's version of the western "True Grit" ? with Jeff Bridges as Rooster Cogburn, newcomer Hailee Steinfeld as the plucky Mattie Ross and Matt Damon as Texas Ranger LaBoeuf ? has won over critics, audiences and even Kim Darby, who played the resolute Mattie in the 1969 original for which John Wayne won his only Oscar as the irascible Cogburn. "It's a wonderful movie," said Darby, now 63. "It's top drawer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
Having already gone through the social media wringer when he was cast in the young-adult franchise "Divergent," Ansel Elgort thought he had a pretty good idea about how passionate and protective readers can be about their favorite books. Then he won the role of Augustus Waters, the love interest in the movie adaptation of John Green's bestselling romance "The Fault in Our Stars," and the 20-year-old actor realized he had crossed into an uncharted realm. For the first few hours after the news broke last May, Elgort's Twitter following mushroomed, and many of the newcomers weren't shy about sharing their opinion about his casting.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
If the clang and clutter of summer superhero movies and action behemoths aren't for you - or even if you just want a break - there are still plenty of options in the months ahead, both at the art house and the far corners of the multiplex. Which isn't to say that even these movies don't have some of the same features as their louder, bigger cousins. There's the end credits stinger of "Calvary," which instead of teasing a sequel hauntingly shows the locations from the movie without people, or the microbudget action sequence of "Happy Christmas," when a frozen pizza forgotten in the oven sets off smoke alarms and panic.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - DMG Entertainment, the Beijing-based company that co-produced Hollywood films including "Iron Man 3" and "Transcendence," is in the process of going public on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange. The move will see DMG enter the exchange through a reverse takeover with meat-processing company Sichuan Gaojin Foods. The deal still needs regulatory approval. According to DMG and Sichuan Gaojin, the deal values DMG at $970 million. That's three times the value of Gaojin at the end of 2013.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Amy Kaufman
Keira Knightley is used to early wake-up calls. The actress has a penchant for period films, and it takes a while to get tied into a corset. But on the set of the modern-day romance "Begin Again," the British star's call time was decidedly later than on "Anna Karenina" or "Pride & Prejudice. " "I'm so used to sitting in a chair for two hours getting my hair and makeup done," she said recently via telephone from the U.K., "but this time I turned up half an hour before I needed to start shooting and chucked my hair in a ponytail.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By John Horn
SYDNEY, Australia - The video playing on the television inside Baz Luhrmann's bedroom was supposed to be much steamier. But where there should have been desirous bumping and prurient grinding, the couples were remarkably chaste, as if they had been ordered to abstain from all manner of randy moves. "Look at this," the filmmaker behind "Moulin Rouge!" and "The Great Gatsby" said from the foot of his bed. "You couldn't get any more sexless. " Working inside the creative compound he calls Iona in Sydney's arty Darlinghurst neighborhood, Luhrmann was sitting with a reporter, reviewing news clips from 1980s Australian ballroom dancing competitions, whose judges favored technique over passion.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Barely a month after revealing plans for a live-action film version of "Jem and the Holograms," producers have announced who will bring the sparkly, neon-haired glam rock band to life. “Nashville” actress Aubrey Peeples has been cast in the titular role, according to the Hollywood Reporter . The Holograms will be rounded out by Stefanie Scott ( “A.N.T. Farm”), who will play Jem's sister, Kimber; Aurora Perrineau (“Pretty Little Liars”), who will play Shana; and Hayley Kiyoko (“The Fosters”)
BUSINESS
May 3, 2010 | By Claudia Eller and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Like the subtitle of his next "Pirates of the Caribbean" movie, producer Jerry Bruckheimer has found himself "on stranger tides" at Disney. Under new studio Chairman Rich Ross, Disney is tacking in a new direction, bringing more fiscal restraint to its movies — especially the costly spectacles that are Bruckheimer's stock in trade. His lavish, action-packed productions, from "Armageddon" to the multibillion-dollar franchise "Pirates of the Caribbean," have drawn crowds and contributed generously to Disney's bottom line.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Welcome to the Rileys," starring James Gandolfini, Kristen Stewart and Melissa Leo as three storm-tossed souls, is like a quiet conversation about despair and hope. Ordinary people trying to deal with the kind of aching loss that's settled deep in the bones. This flawed yet promising film from music video and commercial director Jake Scott (dad is Ridley, uncle is Tony) comes with no show, no razzle-dazzle ? just Doug and Lois Riley (Gandolfini and Leo), eight years into their grief over the death of their teenage daughter in a car accident.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
It should be incredibly dull, just a man in his car on the phone. Yet the new British film "Locke" is gripping in its simplicity, wringing deep, suspenseful drama from a man making difficult decisions from which there will be no turning back. As he drives in his car while on the phone. Ivan Locke - played by Tom Hardy, the only character seen onscreen - is a construction site foreman who is preparing for the largest job of his career, as the next morning he is to oversee the pouring of a massive concrete foundation for a skyscraper.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Before he loved anything else, Jean-Luc Godard loved genre: He famously dedicated his first feature film, "Breathless," to Monogram Pictures, one of the monarchs of Poverty Row B-picture production. But as "Breathless" demonstrated, Godard never did anything straight up. He did genre his own playful way, and never more so than in 1965's "Alphaville," a film that was part science fiction, part hard-boiled adventure, and all Godard. Playing for a week at the Nuart in West Los Angeles in a sharp new digital restoration, "Alphaville" is more than quintessential Godard.
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