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August 31, 2008 | Geoff Boucher; Chris Lee; Mark Olsen; Rachel Abramowitz; Scott Timberg; Patrick Day; Kenneth Turan
The 25 best L.A. films of the last 25 years "Los ANGELES isn't a real city," people have said, "it just plays one on camera." It was a clever line once upon a time, but all that has changed. Los Angeles is the most complicated community in America -- make no mistake, it is a community -- and over the last 25 years, it has been both celebrated and savaged on the big screen with amazing efficacy. Damaged souls and flawless weather, canyon love and beach city menace, homeboys and credit card girls, freeways and fedoras, power lines and palm trees . . . again and again, moviegoers all over the world have sat in the dark and stared up at our Los Angeles, even if it was one populated by corrupt cops or a jabbering cartoon rabbit.
April 27, 2014
PAPUA NEW GUINEA Slide show Pierre Odier will share his insights on Papua New Guinea, one of the last places where primitive man can still be seen in his natural Stone Age environment. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220. WOMEN Workshop Hostelling International will conduct a workshop for women interested in traveling alone. Topics to be covered include health and safety.
January 4, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Most remakes of classic films are shadows of the originals. But Joel and Ethan Coen's version of the western "True Grit" ? with Jeff Bridges as Rooster Cogburn, newcomer Hailee Steinfeld as the plucky Mattie Ross and Matt Damon as Texas Ranger LaBoeuf ? has won over critics, audiences and even Kim Darby, who played the resolute Mattie in the 1969 original for which John Wayne won his only Oscar as the irascible Cogburn. "It's a wonderful movie," said Darby, now 63. "It's top drawer.
April 26, 2014 | By Chris Lee
The 2014 Tribeca Film Festival audience has spoken. And at wrap party Saturday for the Heineken Audience Awards in New York City,  festival entries in the feature film and documentary categories were celebrated with top honors (as well as a pair of $25,000 cash prizes). “ Chef ,” an indie drama starring, written and directed by Jon Favreau -- best known for mega-budget studio fare such as “Iron Man 2” and “Cowboys & Aliens” -- landed TFF's Narrative Award for best feature.
February 22, 2011 | By Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times
Heading into Sunday's Academy Awards, "Exit Through the Gift Shop" is undoubtedly the most buzzed-about film in the documentary feature category. But the uncomfortable question persists: Is it real? The movie is anchored by two of the least reliable narrators in memory: Banksy, the anonymous British street artist; and Thierry Guetta, an eccentric French émigré to Los Angeles whose obsessive filming happens to capture the world of high-concept graffiti. In alternating interviews, the two recount the rise of anti-establishment vandals into the upper echelons of the art world, where their work quickly became commodified.
December 12, 2010
PHOTOGRAPHY Workshop Bring your digital camera and owner's manual and learn about your camera's basic functions and how to shoot better pictures. When, where: 6 p.m. Tuesday, at the REI store in Arcadia, 214 N. Santa Anita Ave. Admission, info: $20 for REI members; $40 for others. (626) 447-1062
August 16, 2009 | Cristy Lytal
Most artists never know what their next gig will be, but color designer Michiyo Yasuda has worked with the same two people for 40 years. Born in Tokyo in 1939, Yasuda joined the ink-and-paint section of the company Toei Doga -- now Toei Animation -- before she was 20. After honing her craft working on commercials and television series, she met animation legends Isao Takahata and Hayao Miyazaki and joined them on the production of 1968's "Little Norse...
February 25, 2010 | By Paul Gaita
Creating a dramatic and believable depiction of people's lives in the running time of a motion picture is a challenge for most screenwriters and directors, but in "Up," Pete Docter and his creative team at Pixar had just a scant few minutes to give the back story of his protagonist, curmudgeonly senior citizen Carl Frederickson (voiced by Ed Asner), which would in turn give him an iron-clad reason to fly his entire house to South America via balloon. What's remarkable about the sequence is not only the scope of the time covered, which takes Carl and his beloved, Ellie, from childhood to old age, but also the complex emotional issues that it addresses, as well as the fact that it unfolds largely in total silence save for Michael Giacchino's Oscar-nominated score.
December 15, 2013 | By Susan King
Tom Laughlin, who came to fame as the half-Native American, half-white ex-Green Beret in the 1971 indie blockbuster "Billy Jack," died Thursday at age  82. A lot of his films are on DVD and on streaming services.  If you want to go back to his earliest films, check out "The Delinquents" (1957) -- which was directed by Robert Altman -- "South Pacific" (1958) and even "Gidget" (1959). And for those who want to revisit his best-known films, or perhaps see them for the first time, here are five: PHOTOS: Tom Laughlin, filmmaker who drew huge following for 'Billy Jack,' dies "The Born Losers": Laughlin first introduced Billy Jack in this low-budget 1967 biker film, which American International Pictures released in 1968.
December 28, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Miles Teller almost died a few years ago. After spending a few days at a Connecticut music festival, he and two buddies were road tripping home to Florida. Cruising down the highway at 75 mph, Teller's friend tried to switch lanes and nearly hit another vehicle. He jerked the steering wheel back but lost control of the car, which went across three lanes of traffic, into a grass median, and flipped seven times. Teller was thrown 25 feet and awoke covered in blood. "I still have two rocks in my face," the boyish 23-year-old actor said, showing off scars on his chin, neck and shoulder.
April 25, 2014 | By Amy Kaufman
Keira Knightley is used to early wake-up calls. The actress has a penchant for period films, and it takes a while to get tied into a corset. But on the set of the modern-day romance "Begin Again," the British star's call time was decidedly later than on "Anna Karenina" or "Pride & Prejudice. " "I'm so used to sitting in a chair for two hours getting my hair and makeup done," she said recently via telephone from the U.K., "but this time I turned up half an hour before I needed to start shooting and chucked my hair in a ponytail.
April 25, 2014 | By Glenn Whipp
Having already gone through the social media wringer when he was cast in the young-adult franchise "Divergent," Ansel Elgort thought he had a pretty good idea about how passionate and protective readers can be about their favorite books. Then he won the role of Augustus Waters, the love interest in the movie adaptation of John Green's bestselling romance "The Fault in Our Stars," and the 20-year-old actor realized he had crossed into an uncharted realm. For the first few hours after the news broke last May, Elgort's Twitter following mushroomed, and many of the newcomers weren't shy about sharing their opinion about his casting.
April 25, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - DMG Entertainment, the Beijing-based company that co-produced Hollywood films including "Iron Man 3" and "Transcendence," is in the process of going public on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange. The move will see DMG enter the exchange through a reverse takeover with meat-processing company Sichuan Gaojin Foods. The deal still needs regulatory approval. According to DMG and Sichuan Gaojin, the deal values DMG at $970 million. That's three times the value of Gaojin at the end of 2013.
April 25, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
If the clang and clutter of summer superhero movies and action behemoths aren't for you - or even if you just want a break - there are still plenty of options in the months ahead, both at the art house and the far corners of the multiplex. Which isn't to say that even these movies don't have some of the same features as their louder, bigger cousins. There's the end credits stinger of "Calvary," which instead of teasing a sequel hauntingly shows the locations from the movie without people, or the microbudget action sequence of "Happy Christmas," when a frozen pizza forgotten in the oven sets off smoke alarms and panic.
April 25, 2014 | By John Horn
SYDNEY, Australia - The video playing on the television inside Baz Luhrmann's bedroom was supposed to be much steamier. But where there should have been desirous bumping and prurient grinding, the couples were remarkably chaste, as if they had been ordered to abstain from all manner of randy moves. "Look at this," the filmmaker behind "Moulin Rouge!" and "The Great Gatsby" said from the foot of his bed. "You couldn't get any more sexless. " Working inside the creative compound he calls Iona in Sydney's arty Darlinghurst neighborhood, Luhrmann was sitting with a reporter, reviewing news clips from 1980s Australian ballroom dancing competitions, whose judges favored technique over passion.
April 24, 2014 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Barely a month after revealing plans for a live-action film version of "Jem and the Holograms," producers have announced who will bring the sparkly, neon-haired glam rock band to life. “Nashville” actress Aubrey Peeples has been cast in the titular role, according to the Hollywood Reporter . The Holograms will be rounded out by Stefanie Scott ( “A.N.T. Farm”), who will play Jem's sister, Kimber; Aurora Perrineau (“Pretty Little Liars”), who will play Shana; and Hayley Kiyoko (“The Fosters”)
June 14, 2011
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March 8, 2010
Wins by film Here are the films that won more than a single Oscar: "The Hurt Locker" ... 6 "Avatar" ... 3 "Crazy Heart" ... 2 "Up" ... 2 "Precious" ... 2
April 24, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
It should be incredibly dull, just a man in his car on the phone. Yet the new British film "Locke" is gripping in its simplicity, wringing deep, suspenseful drama from a man making difficult decisions from which there will be no turning back. As he drives in his car while on the phone. Ivan Locke - played by Tom Hardy, the only character seen onscreen - is a construction site foreman who is preparing for the largest job of his career, as the next morning he is to oversee the pouring of a massive concrete foundation for a skyscraper.
April 24, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Heather Graham - she of Rollergirl fame - is the latest actress to call out Hollywood on its sexism. "Girls" wunderkind Lena Dunham and Oscar winner Cate Blanchett have also made statements on the topic of sexism recently, with the former addressing it in a SXSW panel and the latter bringing it up during her Oscars acceptance speech in March. The "Boogie Nights" star made her fiery statements during a recent Q&A with Esquire magazine that surveyed the actress' characters as of late - roles that cast her as the perennial "sexy mother" in films such as "The Hangover" trilogy (she was in the first and third installments)
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