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Film Festivals

ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
When the Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival canceled its annual showcase last fall, some local cinephiles feared that its 15th edition in 2011 might've been its last. But the festival , one of the country's largest for Spanish- and Portuguese-language films, has rebounded this year, albeit in a more condensed version than in  times past. Its 16th edition will open a five-day run tonight with a screening at the El Capitan in Hollywood of Brazilian director Richard Goldgewicht's partially animated documentary "Pablo," about the visionary Cuban American graphic designer Pablo Ferro.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013 | By Susan King
The Hollywood Black Film Festival, which begins Wednesday and continues through Sunday at the Montalban Theatre and the W Hotel, includes an array of films and panels. But in what might be a first, the festival also features complementary beauty services Friday and Saturday for guests with all-access passes, so you can look good while attending the programs. The festival,  founded in 1998 by Executive Director Tanya Kersey to help develop the careers of both emerging and established black filmmakers, is bookended by movies starring Oscar-winner Jennifer Hudson (“Dreamgirls”)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2013 | by Mark Olsen
The 2014 edition of the TCM Classic Film Festival will run April 10-13. The festival, in its fifth year, will coincide with the 20th anniversary of the Turner Classic Movies cable channel. Passes for the 2013 TCM Classic Film Fest will go on sale in November at prices from $249 to $1,599. TCM's Robert Osborne will again serve as official host of the festival, with Ben Mankiewicz also introducing various events. FULL COVERAGE: Film festivals The Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel will again serve as the festival's official hotel and central gathering point, with screenings and events held at the TCL Chinese Theatre and Chinese 6 Theatres, as well as the Egyptian Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK - For years, the New York Film Festival was a quaint afterthought on the fall festival circuit, good for locals to catch up on prestige titles but devoid of much Hollywood fizz. Not anymore. The Lincoln Center event has become an increasingly important spot for big fall movies, both launching pad and bellwether for the frenzied months of Oscar-contending releases that follow. The 51st edition opens Friday with the Tom Hanks hijacking thriller "Captain Phillips," part of an ambitious Hollywood slate and an indication of a new festival bent.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
This post has been corrected. See below for details. The Hollywood Film Festival is in a tough spot with its mid-October dates falling between the Toronto International Film Festival and L.A.'s own AFI Fest in November. To distinguish itself, the festival, under new leadership, says it is striving to be "more relevant" as it launches its 17th annual event Oct. 18 to 20 at the ArcLight Cinemas in Hollywood, showing 25 features and a still-to-be-announced selection of shorts. The festival will include a “Celebrating Hollywood” spotlight, featuring films that either were shot in Los Angeles or  reference show business.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Ai Weiwei will join the jury of the annual Stockholm Film Festival, although it's questionable if the Chinese dissident artist will be able to attend. The panel, mostly composed of film industry professionals, each year reserves one seat for an artist outside of film, which Ai will fill, organizers announced Monday. Festival director Git Scheynius said the artist was chosen for the panel to symbolize the repression of artists and journalists. PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures by The Times The political activist is hard to reach: He is without Internet access and his travel outside of China is prohibited, according to reports.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | By Susan King
The third Arclight Cinemas Documentary Film Festival, which showcases the work of independent filmmakers, opens Oct. 9 in Hollywood with the Tribeca Film Festival winner, "Let the Fire Burn. " Directed by Jason Osder, "Let the Fire Burn" chronicles the events that surrounded the 1985 encounter between the radical black organization MOVE and the Philadelphia authorities. Other films in the festival, which continues through Oct. 13, are the Sundance and Toronto Film Festival winner "The Square," which focuses in Cairo's Tahrir Square; "The Other Shore," which chronicles Diana Nyad's history-making efforts to swim from Cuba to Florida; and Mahdi Fleifel's "A World Not Ours," about Palestinian refugees in a Lebanese refugee camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By John Horn
There are all kinds of film festivals and almost every one hands out some sort of award. But even with virtually every major city on the planet now hosting a trophy-dispensing movie gathering, there's still just one honor that truly matters: the People's Choice Award at the Toronto International Film Festival. And Fox Searchlight really needed its "12 Years a Slave" to collect that prize over the weekend. Compared with prominent prizes at other top festivals--the Cannes Film Festival's Palme d'Or, the Sundance Film Festival's Grand Jury Prize and the Berlin International Film Festival's Golden Bear--the audience accolade at Toronto is by far the best harbinger of critical and commercial success.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
TORONTO - Standing ovations for movies playing at the Toronto International Film Festival are as ubiquitous as Benedict Cumberbatch and the food trucks lining the downtown entertainment district. Every film receiving a gala premiere brings the audience to its feet (at least, once the houselights go up and the spotlight shines on the stars sitting in the mezzanine), even so-so films that no one particularly adores such as this year's festival opener, "The Fifth Estate. " When a movie prompts festival-goers to clap in unison before the stars hit the stage, as did "12 Years a Slave," that's different.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
TORONTO -- As much as I love challenging films, I'm not sure I would recommend starting the day with “The Railway Man,” with Colin Firth as a British World War II vet suffering serious post traumatic stress disorder, and ending it at midnight with an emaciated Matthew McConaughey in “Dallas Buyers Club,” as a good ol' Texas boy diagnosed in the first wave of the AIDS crisis. But I did. It's the blessing and the curse of film festivals packed with tons of intriguing movies and tight schedules.
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