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November 8, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
On the eve of the release of Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell touted the bipartisan benefits of Virginia's budding film industry. "The increase in jobs and revenue from Virginia's film industry is encouraging and demonstrates the effectiveness of our state's incentive programs for film production," McDonnell said in a news conference at the historic Byrd Theatre in Richmond, Va., prior to a special screening of "Lincoln" hosted by the Virginia Film Office and the Virginia Tourism Corporation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
It's the question on the minds of many in Los Angeles' film community: Does Gov. Jerry Brown get how badly the state's film and TV industry has been squeezed by runaway production? Kish Rajan, director of the Governor's Office of Business & Economic Development, offered some reassuring words to film commissioners and industry executives who gathered in Hollywood on Thursday for an annual breakfast hosted by the California Film Commission. Rajan stopped short of saying whether Brown would rally behind a bill winding through the Assembly that would significantly expand California's film and TV tax credit program, which allocates $100 million annually but is due to run out of funds next year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
The British government took another step to lure filmmakers across the Atlantic. Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne announced Wednesday that the government had approved enhancements to the United Kingdom's film-tax-relief program, which will take effect April 1. Among the key changes, the government said it would offer a 25% credit on the first $33 million of qualifying production expenditure, and 20% thereafter. Currently, such projects could only claim a 20% rebate.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
As the ties between Hollywood and China continue to deepen, organizers plan to bring a first-of-its-kind entertainment industry convention to Los Angeles this fall. The U.S. China Film & TV Industry Expo, aimed at broadening business relationships between film and TV producers in the U.S. and China, will hold its inaugural event Sept. 15 and 16 at the L.A. Convention Center. The expo will include exhibitors from the U.S. and China and will feature panels bringing together filmmakers and entertainment industry executives from both countries to discuss such topics as navigating China's bureaucracy and forming co-production deals.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
More than a dozen California state parks that have been a rich source of filming for such classic Hollywood movies as "High Noon," George Lucas' "Star Wars" sequel "Return of the Jedi" and Steven Spielberg's "Back to the Future III" are in danger of going dark. They are among 70 state parks, historic sites and recreation areas — or 25% of the 278 parks statewide — that Gov. Jerry Brown has proposed closing in response to the state's budget crisis. The planned closings, which are part of the $33 million in park cuts approved by the Legislature this year, are likely to be the subject of intense upcoming budget negotiations in Sacramento.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2012 | By John Horn, Ben Fritz and Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The deadly rampage in Colorado shattered a fundamental appeal of moviegoing: a chance to escape the humdrum for a world of fantasy. Now, theater owners and theWarner Bros.studio must figure out whether"The Dark Knight Rises"can still be an entertaining diversion, not a reminder of a tragic mass shooting. The shooting also raised the specter among moviegoers that they could become targets, leading theater owners and some police forces to step up security measures this weekend. "It's horrifying what happened in Colorado and it makes me scared about copycats here," said Katie Gerber, 34, who had tickets for a Friday afternoon screening at the ArcLight in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2011 | By Steve Terill, Special to the Los Angeles Times
— Beneath a star-filled African sky, crowds of city dwellers and rural farmers gather before a giant inflatable screen. It's movie night in Rwanda and thousands have come to see films selected in this year's Rwanda Film Festival. Most of them have never seen a motion picture on a large screen before and for many this will be the first feature-length film they have ever seen — in any format. Seventeen years after the genocide that tore this country apart — killing more than 800,000 in just 100 days — there is a palpable sense of renewal in Rwanda.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
If you want to film at the Grand Avenue Park, it will cost you -- $20,000 a day in fact. That's how much county officials plan to charge filmmakers to shoot at the new park, much to the chagrin of local film industry officials. County officials said they developed the fee based on what other landmark parks around the country charge. But critics in the film industry noted that the fee is well above what Los Angeles County charges at most other local parks for filming, which is typically $450 a day. Sarah Walsh, director of the Motion Picture Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
The L.A. City Council and the film industry are once again on a collision course over a green-colored bike lane downtown. City officials painted a 1.5-mile strip of Spring Street neon green in 2011 for a bike lane as part of a larger effort pushed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to make streets safer and more inviting to cyclists. But the bike lane has been a bone of contention with location scouts and filmmakers, who complain that bright green color is highly reflective, making it harder to film movies set in a different era along the street and to continue L.A.'s long tradition of playing other cities.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
The death of Tom Sherak, the respected Hollywood executive and recently appointed film czar for Los Angeles, is a blow to the city's film industry. Sherak, the former president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, died Tuesday at his home in Calabasas after suffering a long bout with prostate cancer. His passing comes only four months after he was tapped by Mayor Eric Garcetti to lead his efforts to support the local film industry, which has been buffeted by the exodus of film and TV production to other states and countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
A new report on spurring job growth in Los Angeles covers the bases, but leaves Hollywood out of the picture. The Los Angeles 2020 Commission report, titled "A Time for Action," was commissioned last year by City Council President Herb Wesson and offers various prescriptions to reverse a net decline in jobs over the last two decades. The recommendations include such ideas as promoting bioscience research, establishing a regional tourism authority and combining the ports of L.A. and Long Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2014 | By Richard Verrier and John Horn
When filmmaker Darren Aronofsky started scouting locations for his biblical flood epic, "Noah," he had two potentially competing needs. The landscapes on which he would shoot exteriors needed at first to look like an uninhabitable wasteland, and, after the deluge, a new garden of Eden, where Noah, his family and his ark of animals could begin to repopulate the earth. The writer-director's production team considered Death Valley, deserts in Mexico and the Canary Islands. But when they visited Iceland, "Noah" found its port of call.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
The latest entry in the found-footage subgenre, "The Den" centers on its eponymous Internet hangout where purveyors of snuff films lurk. Grad student Elizabeth Benton (Melanie Papalia), who has received a grant to research the chat network, soon witnesses some ghastly goings-on. Writers Zachary Donohue (who also directs) and Lauren Thompson have seemingly recycled a 2010 "The Daily Show" segment about the Chatroulette website before giving an inspired nod to Nigerian scammers and then offering an underdeveloped reference to Russian roulette.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
In 1958, Ed Michelson started a motion picture catering company - Michelson Food Services - and made food for the cast and crew on such classic films as "West Side Story" and "Some Like it Hot. " Michelson was one of the first to operate a food service truck on film sets, and for decades business boomed, back when virtually all the big studio movies were filmed in Los Angeles. Today, son Steve Michelson said that's no longer the case. When his father died, Michelson decided to start his own catering company, Sylmar-based Limelight Catering, which employs about 50 people and has been in business for 14 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
The British government took another step to lure filmmakers across the Atlantic. Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne announced Wednesday that the government had approved enhancements to the United Kingdom's film-tax-relief program, which will take effect April 1. Among the key changes, the government said it would offer a 25% credit on the first $33 million of qualifying production expenditure, and 20% thereafter. Currently, such projects could only claim a 20% rebate.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- China's box office has made its first $1 billion for the year, crossing the mark in the week that ended Sunday with some help from “Robocop.” Year-to-date box office receipts for the mainland -- the world's second biggest movie market behind the United States -- now stands at $1.03 billion for 2014, film industry consulting firm Artisan Gateway said, a pace significantly ahead of 2013. “Robocop,” Jose Padilha's remake of Paul Verhoeven's 1987 futuristic dystopia classic, took in $21.5 million in its second week in release, claiming the top spot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1990
Black people are collectively fed up and feel that it is time for negative portrayals of blacks in films and on television to cease. Black people of conscience throughout the nation applaud Clegg for having the wisdom to recognize the seriousness of this issue, for having the courage to speak out against it, and for having the decency and sense of reason to request a forum to discuss a resolution of same. Clegg's request for a summit between blacks and Jewish producers does not constitute prejudice; but rather, it demonstrates the actions of a reasonable man who is seeking racial harmony in an effort to restore the dignity of his people.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
At least 500 film industry workers gathered in West Hollywood on Friday night to pay tribute to Sarah Jones, the 27-year-old assistant camerawoman killed on a film set last month in Georgia. Hundreds of union members walked along Sunset Boulevard from the Directors Guild of America building to a parking lot behind the headquarters of the International Cinematographers Guild, where they held candles, and watched videos of Jones' life on two large video screens. Several wore T-shirts with the messages: "We're all Sarah Jones" and "Never Forget.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
When it comes to populist (read: reductive) regional theater, Del Shores has cornered the gay white Texan niche. He attempted to crack the film industry with his 2000 adaptation of the play "Sordid Lives" but lacked the kind of cult following that helped to translate Tyler Perry's theatrical success to the big screen. With "Southern Baptist Sissies," Shores has bypassed an adaptation altogether and released a concert film assembled from stage performances. The film's vignettes of gay white naïfs from the Deep South with identity crises recall the back story of many a contestant on "RuPaul's Drag Race.
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