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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Maxine Cooper Gomberg, an actress best known for playing the secretary in the 1955 film noir classic "Kiss Me Deadly," has died. She was 84. Gomberg, who also was a social activist, died of natural causes April 4 at her Los Angeles home, her family said. The crime thriller "Kiss Me Deadly," loosely based on the Mickey Spillane novel, marked the feature film debut of the actress, then known as Maxine Cooper, and Cloris Leachman.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
The greatest trick that director Bryan Singer ever pulled was to fool audiences with an unreliable narrator in "The Usual Suspects. " Singer is a producer on the new "Uwantme2killhim?" But this time the unreliable narrative seems to convince only the film's luckless protagonist. Based on a true story recounted by Vanity Fair in 2005, "Uwantme2killhim?" traces in flashback the steps of 16-year-old Mark (Jamie Blackley) leading up to him knifing his best friend, John (Toby Regbo)
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NEWS
June 19, 2003 | Kevin Thomas
In recent years the Los Angeles Conservacy's popular annual "Last Remaining Seats" series in South Broadway's movie palaces has included a classic Latin American film, which is appropriate since Latino audiences kept the theaters running well past their heyday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
Are you Parker Sithole? The question served as the original title for "Of Good Report," which screens Thursday as the opening night film of the 22nd Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles. Set in the South African countryside, the film follows a troubled teacher named Parker Sithole (Mothusi Magano), who begins an illicit relationship with the beautiful student Nolitha (Petronella Tshuma) - a relationship that takes a brutal turn and forces Parker to battle past demons. More subtly, the film noir explores the lies that people tell and the morals that they bend to justify actions, at any expense.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2010
Eddie Muller and Alan K. Rode are on a mission -- to prevent our film-noir heritage from fading away. Muller is founder and president of the Film Noir Foundation; Rode is on the board of directors. Every year they produce and host the Noir City Film Festival in Los Angeles and San Francisco. The 12th annual festival at the Egyptian Theatre, "Lust & Larceny," opens Friday and continues through April 18. None of the films in the festival, which was co-programmed by the American Cinematheque's Gwen Deglise and Grant Moninger, are available on DVD. "The type of movie fan that goes down to the Egyptian Theatre is not the same type of person who is going to go in to see 'Double Indemnity' and 'Out of the Past,' because they have seen that," says Rode.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1996
A screening series honoring three filmmakers whose work helped create the film noir genre will be held on three consecutive Saturdays, beginning Saturday in Room 108 of USC School of Cinema-Television's George Lucas Instructional Building. Edward Dmytryk, Abraham Polonsky and Malvin Wald will screen and discuss their works. Information: (213) 740-3317.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were the dames. The dolls. The femmes fatales. The beautiful but deadly leading ladies of the shadowy, cynical, hard-boiled films noir of the 1940s and '50s. They made smoking look sexy and suggestive, and they could lure the toughest lug into their evil web with a flick of their wrist and a wave of their long curly tresses.
NEWS
February 7, 1987
Yves Allegret, a French film director who became well known in the 1940s for a series of dark, somber pictures that typified the film noir genre, has died in Paris, Daily Variety reported this week. Allegret, credited with launching the career of actress Simone Signoret, who became his wife, was 79 and died Jan. 21 of unreported causes. Allegret started in pictures as an assistant to Jean Renoir and his late brother, Marc Allegret, and directed his first full-length picture in 1940.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Oscar-winning "L.A. Confidential" isn't the only classic film noir hitting the video stores this month. Both Kino on Video and Universal have just released vintage film noir collections. Kino's "Film Noir: The Dark Side of Hollywood" features three dark-yet-fun flicks ($25 each) from the 1940s. The best of the lot is Anthony Mann's taut 1947 thriller "Railroaded."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
When the American Cinematheque began its popular film noir festival, "Side Streets & Back Alleys," in 1999, several of the actors and moviemakers involved in the classic genre from the 1940s and '50s were still alive. "It was so grand because we could bring them out as guests," says noir fest programmer, film historian and author Eddie Muller. "It was very gratifying to be able to meet these people." Three years into the festival, Muller realized that a lot of the noir veterans were dying.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Where director Anthony Mann is concerned, there are two kinds of people: those who admire him extravagantly (Jean-Luc Godard, who called him "Supermann," is in that group) and those who are unfamiliar with his output. A new UCLA Film & Television Archive series is ambitious enough to pitch its appeal to both groups. Starting Jan. 31 at the Hammer Museum's Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood, the 22-picture film series "Dark City, Open Country: The Films of Anthony Mann" features both the acknowledged classics that made Mann's modern critical reputation and the early, little-seen Poverty Row programmers he honed his craft on. A director of many parts who closed his career doing historical epics like "El Cid" and "The Fall of the Roman Empire" (neither of which fits into the UCLA program)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins
Actor Peter O'Toole, the swashbuckling star who received eight Academy Award nominations over a distinguished film career, died Saturday in London, his agent, Steve Kenis, said in an email to The Times. O'Toole was 81. A cause of death was not immediately disclosed. O'Toole's career spanned more than 50 years, reaching worldwide fame in the 1962 David Lean epic “Lawrence of Arabia.” He received his final Oscar nomination for lead actor in 2007 for “Venus,” a bittersweet British drama about an elderly London actor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2013
Audrey Totter, 95, a blond leading lady of 1940s film noir who starred as a tough-talking dame in "Lady in the Lake," "The Set-Up" and "High Wall," died Thursday at West Hills Hospital, said her daughter, Mea Lane. Totter, a Woodland Hills resident, had a stroke and suffered from congestive heart failure. Although she had a relatively short film career, Totter created memorable movie moments while under contract with MGM from 1944 to the early '50s. A former radio actress, she had a small part in "The Postman Always Rings Twice," the 1946 movie based on James M. Cain's pulp novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Susan King
"Los Angeles Past, Present and Future," a new film series opening July 19 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, is a companion to its exhibition "The Presence of the Past. " The series opens at the Bing Theater with a rarity: 1925's "The Salvation Hunters," which marked the feature debut of director Josef von Sternberg, who is best known for the melodramas he made with Marlene Dietrich, such as 1930's  "The Blue Angel" and "Morocco. " The independent production starring Georgia Hale ("The Gold Rush")
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Susan King
International cinema takes the spotlight with the Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles continuing at the ArcLight Hollywood multiplex, the UCLA Film and Television Archive's celebration of Iranian cinema opening Saturday at the Billy Wilder Theater, followed by the 17th City of Lights, City of Angels French film celebration opening Monday at the Directors Guild of America with the North American premiere of Daniele Thompson's "It Happened in...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If you haven't found your way over to the Egyptian Theatre to partake of the perfectly pulpy fun of the 15th annual Festival of Film Noir, it is not too late. One of my favorites is there Friday night as part of the double feature package of film based on just two of some 30-plus novels and stories from crime fiction maestro Cornell Woolrich that would make it to the big screen. Some like "Rear Window" would become classics. Few, though, have made it to DVD. That's what makes Friday night's noir lineup -- a cooperative effort between the American Cinematheque and Film Noir Foundation -- such a rare treat.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1998 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
It must be hard being considered something of a legend as a serious filmmaker and never getting a piece of the commercial pie that is shared so generously with the most hackneyed studio directors. It's enough to drive a Costa-Gavras to make a misguided star vehicle like "Mad City," or Gus Van Sant to direct a slick, mainstream production like "Good Will Hunting," or Volker Schlondorff, maker of the classic German film "The Tin Drum," to attempt a thriller as insubstantial as "Palmetto."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1999 | Cecilia Rasmussen
It was Frank Capra meets film noir and it happened, of course, in Los Angeles: The hero was a courageous, square-jawed teetotaler; the heavy, a bootlicking gunman out to frame the good guy. Though it sounded, even then, like something straight out of the movies, their encounter produced the juiciest scandal ever to rock City Hall. Councilman Carl I.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Veteran character actor Richard Erdman has come full circle. Discovered seven decades ago starring in a frivolous school play, "Ever Since Eve," at Hollywood High, Erdman was personally signed to a contract at Warner Bros. by Michael Curtiz, the Oscar-winning director of "Casablanca. " And 70 years later, Erdman's back in school - so to speak. He plays the recurring role of the irascible college student Leonard on NBC's acclaimed sitcom "Community," which returns for its fourth season on Thursday evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | By Dennis Lim
A lean, mean tale of adultery and murder, James M. Cain's bestselling, once-scandalous 1934 novel "The Postman Always Rings Twice" is often considered a central text of noir fiction. It also has proved an eternally popular and durable template for the movies: Its potent mix of class anxiety and carnal violence has been transferred to the screen at least half a dozen times, in an array of social contexts and with varying degrees of fidelity. The best-known version, from 1946, directed by Tay Garnett and starring Lana Turner and John Garfield, gave the noir genre one of its most iconic femme fatales and one of its most persuasively doomed love-hate affairs.
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