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Film Noir

ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2002 | CLIFF ROTHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jane Russell talked about her famous cleavage, Rhonda Fleming cringed about her 1950s potboiler's being corny (it was) and pulp fiction legend Mickey Spillane held court (as usual). It was 110 degrees in the shade (literally) while screens were being scorched by scheming dames, hard-boiled cops and innocent dupes as the Palm Springs Film Noir Festival unfurled its second season last weekend.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1997 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
ovie scholars say the last film noir was released in 1959, but a raft of contemporary directors probably begs to differ: "Red Rock West," "Reservoir Dogs," "The Last Seduction," "One False Move" and "Traveller" are but a few recent releases that rework the tenets of film noir, a style that shows no sign of disappearing. A quick perusal of "Crime Scenes: Movie Poster Art of the Film Noir" (Lawrence Bassoff Collection Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1997 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Movie scholars say the last film noir was released in 1959, but a raft of contemporary directors probably begs to differ: "Red Rock West," "Reservoir Dogs," "The Last Seduction," "One False Move" and "Traveller" are but a few recent releases that rework the tenets of film noir, a style that shows no sign of disappearing. A quick perusal of "Crime Scenes: Movie Poster Art of the Film Noir" (Lawrence Bassoff Collection Inc.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | JOE RHODES, Joe Rhodes is a frequent contributor to TV Times and Calendar
They first appear as descending silhouettes, framed by the sunlight at the top of the stairs. She has seams on her stockings, a lit cigarette in her hand and lips painted fire-engine red. He has a shoulder holster under his jacket, dark bags under his eyes, the look of a man too guilty to sleep. They are cops, both of them, moving deeper into shadow with every downward step.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
DURING World War II, American soldiers were putting their lives on the line fighting in Europe, Africa and the Pacific. And the women -- wives, mothers and girlfriends -- were freed from the shackles of domesticity and began working in defense plants building planes, tanks and other elements of the war machine. There was an unparalleled spirit of camaraderie and patriotism.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He put the hard in hard-boiled. He played a key role in the films noir of the '40s and '50s and influenced the neo-noir films of the '90s. He created one of the most beloved characters in fiction--detective Philip Marlowe. Not only was Raymond Chandler a best-selling author of such mysteries as "The Big Sleep" and "Farewell, My Lovely," he also received two Oscar nominations for his screenplays. Today would have been Chandler's 110th birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite an action thriller ad campaign, "Boiling Point" (citywide) is writer-director James B. Harris' superior contemporary film noir , originally called "Money Men," which is the title of the Gerald Petievich novel upon which it is based. The ads tell us that Wesley Snipes plays "a cop who's reached the boiling point," where in fact his Jimmy Mercer is a Treasury agent of formidable self-control in pursuit of the person or persons who have killed his partner.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2006 | Susan King
'Double Indemnity' Special Edition (Universal, $27) CONSIDERED the first important film noir, this 1944 adaptation of James M. Cain's novella of love, lust, deception and murder still crackles thanks to the brilliant screenplay by Billy Wilder and Raymond Chandler, Wilder's self-assured direction and mesmerizing performances from Fred MacMurray, Barbara Stanwyck and Edward G. Robinson.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1998 | Alternate Screen DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you haven't caught the recent theatrical re-release of Orson Welles' "Touch of Evil," restored and edited to reflect Welles' original vision, Chapman University is offering the next best thing: a chance to see the acclaimed noir thriller as it was released in theaters 40 years ago. Welles' artfully shot tale of murder and vengeance in a U.S.
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