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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
"I Am Not a Hipster" is the kind of lovingly crafted, deeply affecting drama that gives small indie films a good name. It's also a terrific showcase for first-time feature writer-director Destin Daniel Cretton and his superb leading man, Dominic Bogart. The San Diego-set movie tracks one particularly trying week in the life of Brook Hyde (Bogart), a talented musician so completely at odds with himself - and his art - he can barely function; a seemingly decent guy drowning in bad behavior (his explosive radio interview with an earnest DJ, well-played by Brad William Henke, is a corker)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" and Sam Mendes' "Skyfall," the latest installment in the James Bond series, both enjoyed overflow crowds at theaters this weekend, including one venue of particular note -- the 1,012-seat Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills -- which had to turn away film academy members who showed up too close to the movies' 7:30 p.m. start times. "Lincoln" screened Saturday night and, judging from the ovations afforded the post-screening panel -- director Spielberg, producer Kathleen Kennedy, leads Daniel Day-Lewis and Sally Field, screenwriter Tony Kushner and composer John Williams -- the film appears poised to fulfill its promise as an awards-season juggernaut.  "You could feel the respect in the room, but it went beyond that," said one academy member in attendance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Orson Scott Card, the wildly popular author of "Ender's Game" and a string of other science-fiction books, spent much of his time at the Los Angeles Times Book Festival on Saturday talking about film adaptations of his work - some in progress, others he hopes for and at least one piece he never wants to see on screen. "'Speaker for the Dead' is unfilmable," Card said in response to a question from the audience. "It consists of talking heads, interrupted by moments of excruciating and unwatchable violence.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2011
Charles McGraw The gravely voiced actor, who died in 1980 at age 66, played a hit man in the 1946 noir classic "The Killers" and went on to appear in such noir hits as 1950's "Armored Car Robbery, 1951's "Roadblock" and the 1952 classic "The Narrow Margin. " Audrey Totter Totter, now 92, made her film debut in 1945's "Main Street After Dark" and excelled in numerous film noirs, including Robert Montgomery's 1947 version of "Lady in the Lake" and "High Wall," which opens the "Noir City" festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Southland Lumber & Supply Co., one of the leading suppliers of lumber to the entertainment industry, is shutting down next week after nearly seven decades in business - another casualty of runaway production. The closing of the Inglewood company, founded in 1946, marks the end of an era for one of the industry's oldest vendors, whose customers include Warner Bros., Universal Pictures, Paramount Pictures and Sony Pictures. “It has become too difficult to keep going with the big features being taken out of state,” co-owner Johnny Crowell said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK--Pretty much since the moment it began shooting, Lars von Trier's “Nymphomaniac” has whipped up controversy for its explicit nature and willingness to tackle sexual taboos. The film's frank portrayal of sexual obsession--and a character's eagerness to act thereon - is a notion most English-language films stay away from, and certainly English-language films with mainstream celebrities like Shia LaBeouf. But one of the film's stars says that there's little place or reason for outrage.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2012 | By Todd Martens
Some of the signature action films of Tony Scott, who authorities said died Sunday after leaping from the  Vincent Thomas Bridge in San Pedro, had an unbilled but unforgettable character: music. Scott blockbusters such as "Top Gun" and "Beverly Hills Cop II" relied on pop, and the bass notes of Berlin's "Take My Breath Away," which ascend until they suddenly don't, are as much of the former as is Tom Cruise's character Pete "Maverick" Mitchell. In one sense, the use of music in these works is simply representative of another era in filmmaking, one in which key cinematic moments were scored by pop artists rather than anonymously large orchestras.  The promotional benefit was hard to ignore, especially on MTV  in the '80s, where videos such as the Scott-directed "Danger Zone" served as trailers for the films.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Susan King
When girls are good they are very good, but when they are bad they are even better. And during the height of the film noir genre in the 1940s and '50s, some of the juiciest roles for women were as femmes fatales in snappy B-movies. Sony's terrific two-volume "Bad Girls of Film Noir" DVD collections, due out Tuesday, offer eight scrappy samples featuring several female icons of the genre. Volume I kicks off with the 1950 thriller "The Killer That Stalked New York." The killer in question is played by Evelyn Keyes, though she isn't a typical film noir villainess.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1998
A pop quiz: 1--"Murphy Brown" is shot on (a) videotape (b) film; 2--L.A. Times staff photographers shoot on (a) film (b) videotape; 3--The L.A. Times is (a) a newsletter (b) a newspaper. "Murphy Brown" is, as are the majority of four-camera shows, shot on film, not tape ("Signing Off, Quietly," by Judith Michaelson, March 16). There is a world of difference--in style, in look, in production, in cost. This across-the-board generic use of the word "taping" has come to distort both the intrinsic and the artistic nature of the medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Julie Makinen and Nicole Sperling
A spaceship-like, 1,000-seat theater may be the most striking feature of the Motion Picture Academy's planned film museum at LACMA, but the organization has also revealed a bevy of other details about what the six-story, 290,000-square-foot facility opening in 2017, will include. Some highlights: Ground Floor: This will consist of a public piazza, the museum lobby, a cafe and a gift store. The piazza will connect the film museum to the rest of the LACMA campus. The academy says "a majestic red carpet and Cannes-style grand staircase" will take visitors into the soaring 1,000-seat, domed "premiere theater," to be named for David Geffen, who has pledged $25 million to the $300-million museum.
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