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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2011
Charles McGraw The gravely voiced actor, who died in 1980 at age 66, played a hit man in the 1946 noir classic "The Killers" and went on to appear in such noir hits as 1950's "Armored Car Robbery, 1951's "Roadblock" and the 1952 classic "The Narrow Margin. " Audrey Totter Totter, now 92, made her film debut in 1945's "Main Street After Dark" and excelled in numerous film noirs, including Robert Montgomery's 1947 version of "Lady in the Lake" and "High Wall," which opens the "Noir City" festival.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Farley Granger, a handsome young leading man during Hollywood's post-World War II era who was best known for his starring roles in the Alfred Hitchcock suspense thrillers "Strangers on a Train" and "Rope," has died. He was 85. Granger died of natural causes Sunday at his home in Manhattan, said a spokeswoman for the New York City medical examiner's office. In a career that began as a teenager when he was discovered in a local play by a casting director for producer Samuel Goldwyn, Granger made his film debut as a Russian youth in the 1943 film "The North Star.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Southland Lumber & Supply Co., one of the leading suppliers of lumber to the entertainment industry, is shutting down next week after nearly seven decades in business - another casualty of runaway production. The closing of the Inglewood company, founded in 1946, marks the end of an era for one of the industry's oldest vendors, whose customers include Warner Bros., Universal Pictures, Paramount Pictures and Sony Pictures. “It has become too difficult to keep going with the big features being taken out of state,” co-owner Johnny Crowell said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Susan King
When girls are good they are very good, but when they are bad they are even better. And during the height of the film noir genre in the 1940s and '50s, some of the juiciest roles for women were as femmes fatales in snappy B-movies. Sony's terrific two-volume "Bad Girls of Film Noir" DVD collections, due out Tuesday, offer eight scrappy samples featuring several female icons of the genre. Volume I kicks off with the 1950 thriller "The Killer That Stalked New York." The killer in question is played by Evelyn Keyes, though she isn't a typical film noir villainess.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Anthony Mackie had appeared in about two dozen films, including "8 Mile," "Half Nelson" and "The Manchurian Candidate" before "The Hurt Locker," 2009's best picture Academy Award winner. But apparently, it took that performance — as a no-nonsense Army sergeant opposite Oscar nominee Jeremy Renner — to get some people in Hollywood to realize he had even been working as an actor. "I loved the fact that everybody's like, 'Man, where were you?' And I'm like, 'I've been right here.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1998
A pop quiz: 1--"Murphy Brown" is shot on (a) videotape (b) film; 2--L.A. Times staff photographers shoot on (a) film (b) videotape; 3--The L.A. Times is (a) a newsletter (b) a newspaper. "Murphy Brown" is, as are the majority of four-camera shows, shot on film, not tape ("Signing Off, Quietly," by Judith Michaelson, March 16). There is a world of difference--in style, in look, in production, in cost. This across-the-board generic use of the word "taping" has come to distort both the intrinsic and the artistic nature of the medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
How could a movie with a Mexican director, two American stars and the backing of a major U.S. studio be named outstanding British film at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards? That's the question on many awards observers' minds after Alfonso Cuarón's sci-fi thriller "Gravity," starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney and released by Warner Bros., reaped six BAFTA trophies on Sunday, among them one reserved for demonstrations of "outstanding and original British filmmaking which shows exceptional creativity and innovation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2012 | By Todd Martens
Some of the signature action films of Tony Scott, who authorities said died Sunday after leaping from the  Vincent Thomas Bridge in San Pedro, had an unbilled but unforgettable character: music. Scott blockbusters such as "Top Gun" and "Beverly Hills Cop II" relied on pop, and the bass notes of Berlin's "Take My Breath Away," which ascend until they suddenly don't, are as much of the former as is Tom Cruise's character Pete "Maverick" Mitchell. In one sense, the use of music in these works is simply representative of another era in filmmaking, one in which key cinematic moments were scored by pop artists rather than anonymously large orchestras.  The promotional benefit was hard to ignore, especially on MTV  in the '80s, where videos such as the Scott-directed "Danger Zone" served as trailers for the films.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Susan King
Two-time Oscar-winning actress Sally Field, currently starring as Mary Todd Lincoln in Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," will receive the Career Achievement Award at the Palm Springs International Film Festival's Awards Gala on Jan 5. The 24th annual festival takes place Jan. 3-14. "From her all-American roles that brought her early stardom on television to her memorable and award-winning film performances, Sally Field has impressed audiences with her incredible range," said festival chairman Harold Matzner in a statement Thursday morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Matthew Fleischer
Watch your back, Netflix.   Splitsider.com, widely considered to be the bible of comedy geek news, has become the latest entity to dive into the increasingly crowded pool of original online feature film distributors. Inspired by the success of comedians Louis C.K. and Jim Gaffigan -- who both sold live stand-up specials on their own websites in late 2011 and early 2012 respectively -- the site has launched a platform called “ Splitsider Presents ,” which will make original 60-minute-plus films, documentaries and stand-up specials available for streaming and download, targeting Splitsider's alternative comedy fan base.
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