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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Orson Scott Card, the wildly popular author of "Ender's Game" and a string of other science-fiction books, spent much of his time at the Los Angeles Times Book Festival on Saturday talking about film adaptations of his work - some in progress, others he hopes for and at least one piece he never wants to see on screen. "'Speaker for the Dead' is unfilmable," Card said in response to a question from the audience. "It consists of talking heads, interrupted by moments of excruciating and unwatchable violence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
"I Am Not a Hipster" is the kind of lovingly crafted, deeply affecting drama that gives small indie films a good name. It's also a terrific showcase for first-time feature writer-director Destin Daniel Cretton and his superb leading man, Dominic Bogart. The San Diego-set movie tracks one particularly trying week in the life of Brook Hyde (Bogart), a talented musician so completely at odds with himself - and his art - he can barely function; a seemingly decent guy drowning in bad behavior (his explosive radio interview with an earnest DJ, well-played by Brad William Henke, is a corker)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The Dances With Films Festival was born out of a typical Hollywood rejection: 15 years ago, Leslee Scallon and Michael Trent made a feature film for $50,000. They submitted it to a bunch of festivals, only to be turned down. "When we got back all of those generic rejection letters, you start wondering at some point did they even look at my film?" Scallon recalled about "Indemnity. " "Did they even see it?" Trent decided they should organize a festival that would feature their film plus 15 other starless, low-budget indies.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Susan King
When girls are good they are very good, but when they are bad they are even better. And during the height of the film noir genre in the 1940s and '50s, some of the juiciest roles for women were as femmes fatales in snappy B-movies. Sony's terrific two-volume "Bad Girls of Film Noir" DVD collections, due out Tuesday, offer eight scrappy samples featuring several female icons of the genre. Volume I kicks off with the 1950 thriller "The Killer That Stalked New York." The killer in question is played by Evelyn Keyes, though she isn't a typical film noir villainess.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1998
A pop quiz: 1--"Murphy Brown" is shot on (a) videotape (b) film; 2--L.A. Times staff photographers shoot on (a) film (b) videotape; 3--The L.A. Times is (a) a newsletter (b) a newspaper. "Murphy Brown" is, as are the majority of four-camera shows, shot on film, not tape ("Signing Off, Quietly," by Judith Michaelson, March 16). There is a world of difference--in style, in look, in production, in cost. This across-the-board generic use of the word "taping" has come to distort both the intrinsic and the artistic nature of the medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Santa Clarita, the suburban northern Los Angeles County community that has played Afghanistan, Kentucky and Washington, D.C, had a record year for film and TV production. The city generated 1,264 location film days in 2013, up 38% from last year. Those projects generated an estimated $30.5 million in spending on wages, hotels, catering and other goods and services in the city, up from $21.7 million in 2012, according to preliminary figures from the Santa Clarita film office. It marks the third consecutive record year for filming activity in Santa Clarita, which saw steady gains in television production, commercial shoots and mostly lower budget movies, including “Love and Mercy” and “Kitchen Sink.”   ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Two high-profile features that also filmed in Santa Clarita last year were the Denzel Washington thriller “2 Guns” and Marvel Studios' “Iron Man 3," which was mostly filmed outside of California.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman
When Janet Jackson signed on to be a part of "Why Did I Get Married Too?," she knew she'd have to ready herself for an emotional journey. In the sequel to Tyler Perry's 2007 film, Jackson's character -- the always-composed psychologist, Patricia -- slowly begins to unravel as her loveless marriage dissolves. The role required her to cry, scream and fight, challenge enough for any actress -- and then her brother Michael died just three days into filming. Production halted as Jackson flew to L.A. to be with her family.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
How could a movie with a Mexican director, two American stars and the backing of a major U.S. studio be named outstanding British film at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards? That's the question on many awards observers' minds after Alfonso Cuarón's sci-fi thriller "Gravity," starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney and released by Warner Bros., reaped six BAFTA trophies on Sunday, among them one reserved for demonstrations of "outstanding and original British filmmaking which shows exceptional creativity and innovation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Susan King
Two-time Oscar-winning actress Sally Field, currently starring as Mary Todd Lincoln in Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," will receive the Career Achievement Award at the Palm Springs International Film Festival's Awards Gala on Jan 5. The 24th annual festival takes place Jan. 3-14. "From her all-American roles that brought her early stardom on television to her memorable and award-winning film performances, Sally Field has impressed audiences with her incredible range," said festival chairman Harold Matzner in a statement Thursday morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1995
Bravo to Turan. Having seen a preview of the new Kathryn Bigelow film "Strange Days," I was shocked and horrified by the film's "high tech" rape scene. Its screenwriters must think themselves very ingenious to have created the idea of compounding a woman's terror by forcing her to experience her attack through the eyes of her rapist. Shame on Bigelow for allowing this sickening and debasing scene into her film. One would have hoped and perhaps even expected that a woman would show a modicum of sense and sensitivity toward the issue of rape.
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