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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING -- Forget Zach Snyder's "Man of Steel" or Keanu Reeves' "Man of Tai Chi. " China's movie of the summer is a chick flick that has touched off a mini-culture war while raking in the renminbi -- and a sequel is just weeks away. "Tiny Times" tells the story of four fashionable college girls in Shanghai and is perhaps best described as "The Devil Wears Prada" meets "Sex and the City" (minus the sex) with a dash of "The Bling Ring. " The movie is based on a trio of popular young adult novels by Guo Jingming, a waifish 30-year-old celebrity author/entrepreneur who also directed the film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2011
Charles McGraw The gravely voiced actor, who died in 1980 at age 66, played a hit man in the 1946 noir classic "The Killers" and went on to appear in such noir hits as 1950's "Armored Car Robbery, 1951's "Roadblock" and the 1952 classic "The Narrow Margin. " Audrey Totter Totter, now 92, made her film debut in 1945's "Main Street After Dark" and excelled in numerous film noirs, including Robert Montgomery's 1947 version of "Lady in the Lake" and "High Wall," which opens the "Noir City" festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Susan King
When girls are good they are very good, but when they are bad they are even better. And during the height of the film noir genre in the 1940s and '50s, some of the juiciest roles for women were as femmes fatales in snappy B-movies. Sony's terrific two-volume "Bad Girls of Film Noir" DVD collections, due out Tuesday, offer eight scrappy samples featuring several female icons of the genre. Volume I kicks off with the 1950 thriller "The Killer That Stalked New York." The killer in question is played by Evelyn Keyes, though she isn't a typical film noir villainess.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Patrick Goldstein
When I was with a group of parents earlier this week, watching our kids play in a 14-and-under baseball tournament, I asked them how many of the boys - aged 13 and 14--had gone to see the R-rated movie “Ted.” The answer: Just about all of 'em. But here's what I found really surprising: Nearly all of them went with their mothers. Put simply: Despite its rampant drug use, crude sexual banter and profanity-fueled humor, “Ted” has become a family movie. I have to admit that I wasn't exactly shocked.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1998
A pop quiz: 1--"Murphy Brown" is shot on (a) videotape (b) film; 2--L.A. Times staff photographers shoot on (a) film (b) videotape; 3--The L.A. Times is (a) a newsletter (b) a newspaper. "Murphy Brown" is, as are the majority of four-camera shows, shot on film, not tape ("Signing Off, Quietly," by Judith Michaelson, March 16). There is a world of difference--in style, in look, in production, in cost. This across-the-board generic use of the word "taping" has come to distort both the intrinsic and the artistic nature of the medium.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Daniel Miller and John Horn
Melvin Mar's entrée to Hollywood was far from glamorous. As an unpaid intern for "Platoon" producer Arnold Kopelson, Mar was responsible for fetching his boss' lunch of matzo ball soup every day. Mar calculated to the minute how long it would take to walk from the production company's Century City offices to the Stage Deli nearby, buy the soup and decant it into a bowl on Kopelson's desk, still piping hot, at precisely 1 p.m. Mar parlayed...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Santa Clarita, the suburban northern Los Angeles County community that has played Afghanistan, Kentucky and Washington, D.C, had a record year for film and TV production. The city generated 1,264 location film days in 2013, up 38% from last year. Those projects generated an estimated $30.5 million in spending on wages, hotels, catering and other goods and services in the city, up from $21.7 million in 2012, according to preliminary figures from the Santa Clarita film office. It marks the third consecutive record year for filming activity in Santa Clarita, which saw steady gains in television production, commercial shoots and mostly lower budget movies, including “Love and Mercy” and “Kitchen Sink.”   ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Two high-profile features that also filmed in Santa Clarita last year were the Denzel Washington thriller “2 Guns” and Marvel Studios' “Iron Man 3," which was mostly filmed outside of California.
WORLD
February 20, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Film producer Yoram Globus was arrested for suspected tax evasion and released on bail Tuesday evening, local media reported . The Israel Tax Authority asked for Globus' arrest as part of its investigation of the veteran movie maker. According to a statement from the tax authority Wednesday, Globus withdrew more than $7.3 million from two of his companies in 2005 and failed to declare it as income. Tax authorities calculated the interest on the resulting tax debt that has accumulated over the years at more than $4 million.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2010 | By Richard Verrier
A robust TV pilot season, a substantially improved climate for shooting commercials and the state's new film incentive helped deliver a modicum of good news to Los Angeles' beleaguered production economy in the first quarter. Overall on-location filming activity for feature films, television and commercials jumped 25% during the first three months of 2010 compared with the same period last year, according to data from FilmL.A. Inc., the nonprofit group that handles permits for on-location filming for L.A. and unincorporated areas of the county.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The Dances With Films Festival was born out of a typical Hollywood rejection: 15 years ago, Leslee Scallon and Michael Trent made a feature film for $50,000. They submitted it to a bunch of festivals, only to be turned down. "When we got back all of those generic rejection letters, you start wondering at some point did they even look at my film?" Scallon recalled about "Indemnity. " "Did they even see it?" Trent decided they should organize a festival that would feature their film plus 15 other starless, low-budget indies.
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