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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2011
Charles McGraw The gravely voiced actor, who died in 1980 at age 66, played a hit man in the 1946 noir classic "The Killers" and went on to appear in such noir hits as 1950's "Armored Car Robbery, 1951's "Roadblock" and the 1952 classic "The Narrow Margin. " Audrey Totter Totter, now 92, made her film debut in 1945's "Main Street After Dark" and excelled in numerous film noirs, including Robert Montgomery's 1947 version of "Lady in the Lake" and "High Wall," which opens the "Noir City" festival.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Santa Clarita, the suburban northern Los Angeles County community that has played Afghanistan, Kentucky and Washington, D.C, had a record year for film and TV production. The city generated 1,264 location film days in 2013, up 38% from last year. Those projects generated an estimated $30.5 million in spending on wages, hotels, catering and other goods and services in the city, up from $21.7 million in 2012, according to preliminary figures from the Santa Clarita film office. It marks the third consecutive record year for filming activity in Santa Clarita, which saw steady gains in television production, commercial shoots and mostly lower budget movies, including “Love and Mercy” and “Kitchen Sink.”   ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll Two high-profile features that also filmed in Santa Clarita last year were the Denzel Washington thriller “2 Guns” and Marvel Studios' “Iron Man 3," which was mostly filmed outside of California.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Susan King
When girls are good they are very good, but when they are bad they are even better. And during the height of the film noir genre in the 1940s and '50s, some of the juiciest roles for women were as femmes fatales in snappy B-movies. Sony's terrific two-volume "Bad Girls of Film Noir" DVD collections, due out Tuesday, offer eight scrappy samples featuring several female icons of the genre. Volume I kicks off with the 1950 thriller "The Killer That Stalked New York." The killer in question is played by Evelyn Keyes, though she isn't a typical film noir villainess.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Southland Lumber & Supply Co., one of the leading suppliers of lumber to the entertainment industry, is shutting down next week after nearly seven decades in business - another casualty of runaway production. The closing of the Inglewood company, founded in 1946, marks the end of an era for one of the industry's oldest vendors, whose customers include Warner Bros., Universal Pictures, Paramount Pictures and Sony Pictures. “It has become too difficult to keep going with the big features being taken out of state,” co-owner Johnny Crowell said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The drama and romance of "Seeking a Friend for the End of the World," starring Steve Carell and Keira Knightley, starts imploding long before the massive asteroid hurtling toward Earth is due to deliver annihilation. At least it's an ambitious misfire from the filmmaker, screenwriter Lorene Scafaria making a rocky directing debut. The movie ponders what people would do with their final days if the end were a fait accompli . Will anarchy reign or will humanity win out? Will Dodge (Carell)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2013
There's not a lot of sweetness and light to recommend this weekend, but if you are in the mood for a walk on the dark side, two films call out from the abyss. "The Silence" is an exemplary German-language thriller in which the crime under investigation is the rape and murder of young girls. An impressive feature debut by writer-director Baran bo Odar, this is a complex and disturbing examination of guilt, violence and psychological torment that chills to the core. Just as accomplished but quite different in tone is Kim Nguyen's "War Witch," an examination of two violent years in the life of an African child soldier that is potent enough to be one of the five nominees for the foreign-language Oscar.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Julie Makinen and Nicole Sperling
A spaceship-like, 1,000-seat theater may be the most striking feature of the Motion Picture Academy's planned film museum at LACMA, but the organization has also revealed a bevy of other details about what the six-story, 290,000-square-foot facility opening in 2017, will include. Some highlights: Ground Floor: This will consist of a public piazza, the museum lobby, a cafe and a gift store. The piazza will connect the film museum to the rest of the LACMA campus. The academy says "a majestic red carpet and Cannes-style grand staircase" will take visitors into the soaring 1,000-seat, domed "premiere theater," to be named for David Geffen, who has pledged $25 million to the $300-million museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1998
A pop quiz: 1--"Murphy Brown" is shot on (a) videotape (b) film; 2--L.A. Times staff photographers shoot on (a) film (b) videotape; 3--The L.A. Times is (a) a newsletter (b) a newspaper. "Murphy Brown" is, as are the majority of four-camera shows, shot on film, not tape ("Signing Off, Quietly," by Judith Michaelson, March 16). There is a world of difference--in style, in look, in production, in cost. This across-the-board generic use of the word "taping" has come to distort both the intrinsic and the artistic nature of the medium.
WORLD
February 20, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Film producer Yoram Globus was arrested for suspected tax evasion and released on bail Tuesday evening, local media reported . The Israel Tax Authority asked for Globus' arrest as part of its investigation of the veteran movie maker. According to a statement from the tax authority Wednesday, Globus withdrew more than $7.3 million from two of his companies in 2005 and failed to declare it as income. Tax authorities calculated the interest on the resulting tax debt that has accumulated over the years at more than $4 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
How could a movie with a Mexican director, two American stars and the backing of a major U.S. studio be named outstanding British film at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards? That's the question on many awards observers' minds after Alfonso Cuarón's sci-fi thriller "Gravity," starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney and released by Warner Bros., reaped six BAFTA trophies on Sunday, among them one reserved for demonstrations of "outstanding and original British filmmaking which shows exceptional creativity and innovation.
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