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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Before he loved anything else, Jean-Luc Godard loved genre: He famously dedicated his first feature film, "Breathless," to Monogram Pictures, one of the monarchs of Poverty Row B-picture production. But as "Breathless" demonstrated, Godard never did anything straight up. He did genre his own playful way, and never more so than in 1965's "Alphaville," a film that was part science fiction, part hard-boiled adventure, and all Godard. Playing for a week at the Nuart in West Los Angeles in a sharp new digital restoration, "Alphaville" is more than quintessential Godard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
When a documentary interviewee says, "My dad has been collecting penises as long as I remember," you know you've entered some unusual film territory. Such is the case of "The Final Member," which revolves around the Icelandic Phallological Museum, an exhibit hall devoted to preserved male genitalia from a variety of mammalian species except one: human. And it's the quest for that holy grail of specimens that drives much - frankly too much - of co-directors Jonah Bekhor and Zach Math's decidedly quirky, at times unappetizing film.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
It's the question on the minds of many in Los Angeles' film community: Does Gov. Jerry Brown get how badly the state's film and TV industry has been squeezed by runaway production? Kish Rajan, director of the Governor's Office of Business & Economic Development, offered some reassuring words to film commissioners and industry executives who gathered in Hollywood on Thursday for an annual breakfast hosted by the California Film Commission. Rajan stopped short of saying whether Brown would rally behind a bill winding through the Assembly that would significantly expand California's film and TV tax credit program, which allocates $100 million annually but is due to run out of funds next year.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
It's a Small World, the 50-year-old Disneyland attraction with the singing automatonic children, is reportedly being turned into a movie. Deadline.com reported that Jon Turteltaub has been hired by Walt Disney Studios to direct the movie based on the attraction, with writer Jared Stern on board to write the script. Turteltaub has worked with Disney before, directing the two "National Treasure" films staring Nicolas Cage, and "The Kid" starring Bruce Willis. Most recently, he directed "Last Vegas" with Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas and Morgan Freeman.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
"Brick Mansions," Paul Walker's penultimate film (prior to "Fast & Furious 7"), is a dumb and ugly action picture that works strictly as a reminder of the late actor's head-turning good looks and modest charisma. Otherwise, this remake of the 2004 French thriller "District B13," directed by Camille Delamarre (editor of "Transporter 3" and "Taken 2"), is a dizzying mishmash of showy stunts, muddled narrative and some seriously risible acting and dialogue. Prolific filmmaker Luc Besson's screenplay, faithfully adapted from the "B13" script he wrote with Bibi Naceri, has relocated this dystopian crime tale from 2006 Paris to 2018 Detroit (as if the Motor City didn't have enough image problems)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Based on the 2011 Cameron Diaz film of the same name, "Bad Teacher" is something of a novelty on CBS, a single-camera comedy in a sea of old-fashioned multicamera, feel-the-hilarity sitcoms like "The Big Bang Theory," "Two Broke Girls" and "Mike & Molly. " ("The Crazy Ones," whose time slot "Bad Teacher" will occupy, cracked that mold this season but did not break it.) Nevertheless, and for all the studied outrageousness of its model, it tells a now-familiar, deceptively sweet tale of the unruly force that brings its own kind of order and relief.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It sounds contrived, and it is. It sounds like a bit of a stunt, and it is that too. It may even sound boring, but that it is not. In fact, whip-smart filmmaking by writer-director Steven Knight and his team combined with Tom Hardy's mesmerizing acting make the micro-budgeted British independent "Locke" more minute-to-minute involving than this year's more costly extravaganzas. Though a dozen actors are listed in "Locke's" credits, Hardy is the only one who appears on screen in this real-time drama that unfolds inside a moving BMW during the 85 minutes it takes construction foreman Ivan Locke to make a nighttime drive from Birmingham to London.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Heather Graham - she of Rollergirl fame - is the latest actress to call out Hollywood on its sexism. "Girls" wunderkind Lena Dunham and Oscar winner Cate Blanchett have also made statements on the topic of sexism recently, with the former addressing it in a SXSW panel and the latter bringing it up during her Oscars acceptance speech in March. The "Boogie Nights" star made her fiery statements during a recent Q&A with Esquire magazine that surveyed the actress' characters as of late - roles that cast her as the perennial "sexy mother" in films such as "The Hangover" trilogy (she was in the first and third installments)
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Back in the day, actress Marion Davies' luxurious beach house in Santa Monica had more than 100 rooms and an ornate swimming pool. Little of the original mansion still exists, but what's now known as the Annenberg Community Beach House still has plenty of oceanfront allure. The beach house will mark its fifth anniversary Saturday and Sunday with an open house that is to feature activities as varied as ballroom dancing and paddleboarding lessons. Guided tours with architects John Berley and Mia Lehrer are scheduled for 10 a.m. each day. The mansion was financed by Davies' lover, newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst, and many grand Hollywood parties were held here, according to a history on the beach house website . Hearst engaged Julia Morgan to design it; Morgan also designed Hearst Castle in San Simeon, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Director Drake Doremus had a clear career path ahead of him when his romantic drama "Like Crazy" swept several big awards at Sundance in 2011. With the most buzzed-about movie at the festival in years and an acquisition deal worth millions of dollars from the unlikely Sundance player Paramount, Doremus was suddenly the rare indie director with the overnight clout to walk on to a big studio film. He went another way instead. After watching one studio romantic-comedy script after another cross his desk, he chose to eschew the conventional wisdom, and the advice of some of his reps, and return to the indie world.
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