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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2010
Divided among a variety of Silver Lake, Echo Park and downtown venues ? including the Echoplex, Spaceland, Taix and 826LA ? Filter magazine's Culture Collide Festival brings some of the best and brightest indie rockers from around the world. Israel, Norway, Canada and others countries are represented, with two highlights being insolent Georgia garage rockers the Black Lips and England's post-punk alt-favorites, Klaxons. 4 p.m.-1 a.m. Thu., 2 p.m.-1 a.m. Fri.-Sat. and 2:30 p.m.-midnight Sun. Wristbands $20. See website for complete schedule and tickets.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
April 20, 2014 | By Jen Leo
Get more quality time out of your vacations, let alone weekends at home, with this app. Name: AwayFind Available for: Android and iPhone, iPad and iPod touch (requires iOS 6.1 or later) What it does: It alleviates the need to check your email continually by letting you filter which topics and people you need to hear from when you're away. Assign the priority email addresses or keywords and AwayFind will send you an SMS text to your smartphone when they arrive.
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OPINION
May 5, 2012
Re "Outside groups lead the charge," May 3 Wouldn't democracy be better served if there was a nonpartisan filter through which both sides would be threaded? All the "outside groups" should have the information in their ads would be fact-checked before release. The system followed now permits false claims, downright lies or, at best, shades of the truth with important omissions. This is no way to run an honorable political campaign. Anita C. Singer Laguna Woods ALSO: Letters: Ban the boarders Letters: Funding L.A.'s parks Letters: Adult education is worth saving
HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
The big guy in the water pitcher-filter market has practically become a common name, like Kleenex. But even Brita's most ardent fans might agree that those plastic containers aren't dinner party elegant. There's a new player hoping to fill that spot: Soma, a glass carafe with a plastic filter that sits inside it. The filter, which lasts two months, is biodegradable, made of coconut shell, silk and food-based plastic, the company says. It costs $49 with one filter; additional filters, automatically mailed to subscribers, cost $12.99.
HEALTH
March 28, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
The big guy in the water pitcher-filter market has practically become a common name, like Kleenex. But even Brita's most ardent fans might agree that those plastic containers aren't dinner party elegant. There's a new player hoping to fill that spot: Soma, a glass carafe with a plastic filter that sits inside it. The filter, which lasts two months, is biodegradable, made of coconut shell, silk and food-based plastic, the company says. It costs $49 with one filter; additional filters, automatically mailed to subscribers, cost $12.99.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Yahoo, jumping in to fill a void left by Instagram, is updating its Flickr iPhone app with numerous photo filters -- among them a way to export pictures to Twitter. Marissa Mayer's company announced a major update for its Flickr iPhone app Wednesday. The layout for the revised iPhone version of Flickr looks very much like Instagram with a dose of Pinterest thrown in. The app features a navigation bar at the bottom of the screen complete with a section that shows users the photos their friends have been sharing.
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
To invert or not to invert? That is the question for users of the AeroPress, the manual brewer invented by the Stanford University lecturer who also invented the Aerobie flying ring -- two tubes of plastic respectively outfitted with a plunger and a filter for making what many pros consider an excellent cup of coffee. If the winning method at the 2013 U.S. AeroPress Championship this weekend at the Specialty Coffee Assn. of America Symposium is any indication, then invert.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2010 | By Alex Pham
Call it tele-psychic. NBC.com is deploying a technology that aims to divine what individual visitors to its website want to watch and is enlisting the Filter, a company partly funded by British rocker Peter Gabriel, to do so. Anticipating what Web viewers want to watch next is not as easy as it looks. What you feel like watching is not going to be the same thing that your best friend, looking at the same Web page, is going to want to see. So NBC.com has to know who's looking at its site and be able to read their minds -- sort of. That's where the Filter comes in. It tries to figure out the tastes of each person based on the digital breadcrumbs they leave behind on their computers.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Palm Desert-based U.S. Filter Corp. said it boosted its offer to buy the 94.8% of Memtec Ltd. shares it doesn't own to $36 a share, an offer accepted by Memtec directors. The bid, raised from $34.50 a share, values the company at about $380 million. It's the second time U.S. Filter has raised its bid for Memtec, based in Sydney, Australia. U.S. Filter wants Memtec's Memcor municipal water filtration system, which cleans water cheaply.
OPINION
June 27, 2003
Re "Web Porn Filters at Libraries Upheld," June 24: Like many of my colleagues who are attending the American Library Assn.'s annual conference in Toronto this week, I am appalled by the Supreme Court's decision in U.S. vs. the American Library Assn. While decisions to select library resources are based on criteria developed by the library staff, Internet filters block sites with certain words in their content. More important to librarians, software manufacturers do not provide their criteria to the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Sharon Mizota
Kota Ezawa's re-creations of photographic images in flat, solid areas of color look as though they were run through a Photoshop filter, à la Shepard Fairey. This expressionless, deadpan aesthetic, evoking fashionable illustration techniques, has become a signature for the Japanese German artist. It might feel like a formula if it weren't so effective. Ezawa's success owes in large part to his judicious choice of subjects, which in the past have included the Kennedy assassination and the O.J. Simpson trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Over at Essay Daily (which calls itself “A Filter for and An Ongoing Conversation About Essays and Magazines About Writing”), John D'Agata offers a brief meditation on Ansel Adams - and the moment he understood that photographs were not taken so much as made. The year was 1927, and Adams “hadn't figured out yet how to make photography work, how to render with light and luck and dark the deep and powerful truths that he felt when in the mountains.” He was in Yosemite, shooting images of Half Dome, when, as an experiment, he decided to use “a heavy red filter that immediately darkens the sky, transforms it even darker than the cliff face itself, so that an abyss opens up on the left side of the cliff, as if the brooding shelf of Half Dome has torn straight through it like a cleaver made of light.” This, D'Agata suggests, is the turning point: when Adams stopped merely being someone who shot pictures and became an artist, with all the intentionality it implies.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
MEXICO CITY - The cultural ecology of any great city is a complex organism, its shape shifting over time. But in the modern era, always it starts with the same ingredient. It starts with artists, the yeast that makes the dough rise. Without them, money and talk are all there is. Since the 1990s, after several decades of relative stasis, Mexico City's cultural ecology has experienced an efflorescence. A cosmopolitan mix of important Mexican and expatriate artists - Britain's Melanie Smith, Belgium's Francis Alÿs, Mexico's Silvia Gruner, Gabriel Orozco, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Teresa Margolles, Eduardo Abaroa and scores more - has been accompanied by significant growth in art's essential critical, curatorial and commercial apparatus.
HEALTH
October 11, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
If your pollen allergies are acting up and getting you down, don't despair. There are steps you can take that can make a real difference. Avoiding pollen altogether is probably impossible (unless you live under a dome, in which case you have plenty of other problems). But there are ways to limit your exposure. Keep your doors and windows closed and run a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. Keep your car windows closed and run the air conditioner. Check the pollen count (one good site is http://www.pollen.com/allergy-forecast.asp )
BUSINESS
October 4, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
Google Glass has been hogging the spotlight when it comes to eyewear, but get ready to see new technology designed for those stuck with old-fashioned prescription eyeglasses. About 64% of Americans wear glasses to improve vision. Many can't stand them, complaining that glasses are cumbersome, headache-inducing or don't work in all situations. Meanwhile, the growing amount of time people spend in front of computers and mobile devices has also raised concern about the potential damaging effects on eyesight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
As state air pollution officials step up inspections of diesel exhaust from big rigs, some of their best allies are truckers themselves. They are pushing the Air Resources Board to enforce pollution rules more aggressively for trucks in advance of a Jan. 1 deadline. Truckers are also the No.1 tipsters, placing anonymous calls and sending emails to finger competitors they say are gaining an unfair advantage by not upgrading their engines or installing expensive filters that capture harmful diesel particulates before they are released into the air. Diesel exhaust is the worst remaining pollution source on roadways.
NEWS
July 13, 2008 | Al Kamen, Washington Post
Having an "auto-replace" filter seemed like a good notion at the time to folks running the OneNewsNow.com website of the conservative American Family Assn. There were certain words that would pop up from time to time in the Associated Press stories that moved onto the site that they considered a bit salacious, or unacceptable to post. "We don't have the staff to monitor all the Hollywood stories," news director Fred Jackson said, "so we wanted an automated function." He said they put up the filter about a month or so ago. One word they wanted to filter was "gay."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The Jokers A Novel Albert Cossery, translated from the French by Anna Moschovakis NYRB Classics: 146 pp.,$14.95 paper A Splendid Conspiracy A Novel Albert Cossery, translated from the French by Alyson Waters New Directions: 216 pp., $14.95 paper Albert Cossery, who died in 2008 at age 94, ought to be a household name. He's that good: an elegant stylist, an unrelenting ironist, his great subject the futility of ambition "in a world where everything is false.
SCIENCE
September 6, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Good news, space-loving hipsters: NASA has joined Instagram. As of Friday morning, you won't have to go hunting around the Internet for all those images of galaxies that look like animals, rockets about to launch, and Curiosity's adventures on Mars. They'll show up right in your Instagram stream, in that square format you've come to know and love. They will also be accompanied by fairly lengthy captions to help you understand a bit of the science behind what you see. The agency kicked off the account Friday morning with a full-color image of Earth rising over the horizon of the moon, taken from Apollo 11 in July 1969.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2013 | Sandy Banks
Najee Ali is an old hand at activism. Jesse Jackson was his mentor; he's Al Sharpton's protege. So Ali thought he had everything in place for a peaceful protest of the verdict in the Trayvon Martin case this week. But somewhere between the opening prayer and Walmart being trashed, something went terribly wrong with Monday night's Crenshaw-area rally . While a few hundred folks were gathered at Leimert Park, praying, singing and venting, dozens of unruly young people began commandeering the streets.
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