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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2010 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
When Malibu's new central park opens Saturday, visitors will see sculptures of a giant king snake and burrowing owl covered in jazzy mosaic tiles. And those who stroll the park's decomposed granite pathways will observe hillocks, 500 freshly planted trees and cyan-colored patches of mulch and seeds that should grow to resemble coastal prairie. Less obvious, however, will be the park's reason for being: reducing water pollution. Buried beneath visitors' feet is a sophisticated network of pipes and filters engineered to remove bacteria, metals and trash from the stormwater runoff that has long contaminated Malibu Creek, Malibu Lagoon and the point break at Surfrider Beach.
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BUSINESS
September 15, 2010 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Alex Weil's football-sized invention ranks high on the improbability scale: a filter that cleans an engine's oil so long that after three years of testing on 17 Idaho tour buses, financed by the Energy Department, the filters were still going strong. "When I tell people how long my oil processors last, they just don't believe me," Weil said. "They just give me a blank stare. " Luckily for Weil, the filter didn't sound too good to be true to PortTechLA, a relatively new business incubator operated by a coalition that includes the port and city of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The Jokers A Novel Albert Cossery, translated from the French by Anna Moschovakis NYRB Classics: 146 pp.,$14.95 paper A Splendid Conspiracy A Novel Albert Cossery, translated from the French by Alyson Waters New Directions: 216 pp., $14.95 paper Albert Cossery, who died in 2008 at age 94, ought to be a household name. He's that good: an elegant stylist, an unrelenting ironist, his great subject the futility of ambition "in a world where everything is false.
NEWS
August 9, 2010
The Food and Drug Administration on Monday warned physicians and patients against leaving vena cava filters -- designed to filter blood clots from the veins and prevent them from reaching the heart -- in patients for extended periods of time because the devices have a disturbing tendency to create problems, some of them life-threatening. The filters are tiny, spider-like implants that are placed into the inferior vena cava, which returns blood from the lower half of the body to the heart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2010 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's most outspoken group of city commissioners could soon find themselves with less freedom to speak their minds. Bruce Ackerman, chairman of the Board of Commissioners of the Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles, advised his colleagues last month that they should refuse to talk to the news media unless coached by the agency's public relations staff. In a six-page memo, Ackerman said his colleagues should "decline immediate comment" when contacted by reporters and instead refer calls to the agency's press office.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2010 | By Alex Pham
Call it tele-psychic. NBC.com is deploying a technology that aims to divine what individual visitors to its website want to watch and is enlisting the Filter, a company partly funded by British rocker Peter Gabriel, to do so. Anticipating what Web viewers want to watch next is not as easy as it looks. What you feel like watching is not going to be the same thing that your best friend, looking at the same Web page, is going to want to see. So NBC.com has to know who's looking at its site and be able to read their minds -- sort of. That's where the Filter comes in. It tries to figure out the tastes of each person based on the digital breadcrumbs they leave behind on their computers.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2010 | By David Sarno and Jessica Guynn
Google Inc. broke a long silence in its clash with China on Wednesday as its chief executive, Eric Schmidt, said that the Internet search giant was talking to Chinese officials and that he expected "something will happen soon." Schmidt's statement, made during a media summit in Abu Dhabi, marked the first time Google acknowledged talking to the Chinese government since it unleashed a global firestorm in January by revealing it had been the victim of major cyber attacks originating from China.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2010 | Kathleen Hennessey, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
WASHINGTON -- First there was the "tea party" protester. Now meet the Tea-publican. Conservative activists who once protested the political establishment are now flooding the lowest level of the Republican Party apparatus hoping to take over the party they once scorned -- one precinct at a time. Across the country, tea party groups that had focused on planning rallies are educating members on how to run for GOP precinct representative positions. The representatives help elect county party leaders, who write the platform and, in some places, determine endorsements.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey
First there was the "tea party" protester. Now meet the Tea-publican. Conservative activists who once protested the political establishment are now flooding the lowest level of the Republican Party apparatus hoping to take over the party they once scorned -- one precinct at a time. Across the country, tea party groups that had focused on planning rallies are educating members on how to run for GOP precinct representative positions. The representatives help elect county party leaders, who write the platform and, in some places, determine endorsements.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2010 | By David Pierson
A Santa Barbara software maker has filed a $2.2-billion lawsuit against the Chinese government and several Chinese technology firms, accusing them of conspiring to steal and disseminate the U.S. firm's Internet filtering technology. Cybersitter, also known as Solid Oak Software Inc., alleged in a federal lawsuit filed Tuesday in Los Angeles that Chinese software makers stole thousands of codes to develop a controversial Internet filtering program that was to be installed on all personal computers in China by July 2009.
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