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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2009
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SCIENCE
January 21, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Fish don't have fingers, but they could. That conclusion, drawn by a team of researchers in Switzerland, casts new light on the evolution of four-legged land vertebrates, suggesting that a flick of a switch could have repurposed the bony radials of fins to become the fingers and toes of land-based animals. The DNA programming architecture necessary to create such digits was present in the ancient genome of fish, before the emergence of amphibians, according to the researchers, who published their findings Tuesday in the online journal PLOS Biology.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Scientists at Glasgow University believe that flexible mechanical fins that copy the action of the tail of a fast-swimming fish or whale could propel ships with 20% greater efficiency than conventional screw propellers. Bob McGregor and his team have developed a flexible fin that mechanically simulates the action of the tail of a fish. Such simulation has been made possible by the recent development of reinforced plastics that combine great flexibility and fatigue resistance with high tensile and bonding strength.
SCIENCE
January 13, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
You've met the front of Tiktaalik roseae , the fish-like creature that fills an important gap between fish and four-legged, land-based animals. Now, the hindquarters of the 375-million-year-old fossil are having their close-up moment, and they're showing a pelvis that marks it farther along the evolutionary track from fin to limb. Discovered in the Canadian Arctic in 2004, and introduced to the scientific world two years later, Tiktaalik roseae demonstrates the predictive power of Darwin's theory of evolution -- a transitional creature found on the timeline precisely where the theory assumed it ought to be. Tiktaalik, an Inuit word for “large, freshwater fish,” had a skeletal structure that likely allowed it to support itself with its front and back fins, and “walk” with them, at least in shallow waters, according to a study published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
SCIENCE
June 24, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
A change in just one gene may have jump-started the transition of ancient fish into animals that could move on land — by deleting a fin and replacing it with the rudiments of a limb, scientists reported Thursday in the journal Nature. Marie-Andree Akimenko and co-workers at the University of Ottawa in Canada identified a set of genes that was absent in tetrapods, the animals with four limbs that descended from fish, but present in all seven species of fish they investigated.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a look worn by trendy teens, late boomers and shoe salesmen at Barneys--a hairstyle that originated in England but is now making waves stateside. It's called the fin, and it may be coming to a salon near you, if it hasn't already washed up. What's the fin? "It's hair that's cut real short, and up on top it all gets pushed toward the center so it looks almost like a Mohawk," said David Petersen, co-owner of Rudy's Barbershop, a trend-setting salon in the Standard Hotel that does the cut.
NATIONAL
July 9, 2012
  The shark's giant dorsal fin sliced through the sparkling blue waters off Cape Cod, trailing an oblivious kayaker as wide-eyed beach-goers watched in horror. The only thing missing was the ominous, thumping soundtrack from "Jaws," the 1975 blockbuster about a great white shark that terrorizes a seaside resort. "Shark!" people began screaming at the kayaker, who looked over his shoulder, spotted the looming fin, and paddled faster. He got away and the beach has reopened following Saturday's drama.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | Michael Wilmington
A high-spirited mermaid fantasy and romantic comedy, with Tom Hanks (pictured) and John Candy drowned in the loveliness of fin-flipping Daryl Hannah (pictured). It's not as good as it seemed in 1984, but director Ron Howard and the actors give it a nice bright bounce and splash.
WORLD
April 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Two unmanned U.S. drones crashed a block away from a ceremony where American and Afghan officials were inaugurating a courthouse. The ceremony in Gardez, 60 miles south of the capital, Kabul, went ahead as planned. American and Afghan soldiers scrambled over walls to retrieve the wreckage of the drones, and one emerged with what looked like a broken-off tail fin. It was not known why the drones crashed. The Gardez court is the second of 16 being refurbished with American aid as part of an Italian-led drive to rebuild Afghanistan's decrepit legal system.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1998 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Perhaps you're a closet Victorian," said a friend of mine dryly to one of our dinner companions, observing with relish the frilly setting at the Secret Garden. Moorpark is a farm town that would look at home in, say, Montana, and until recently the dining scene here has been limited mainly to steak joints and Mexican restaurants. The Secret Garden adds a charming new dimension. It's in a converted old ice cream shop, and the ornate decor suggests both rustic California and fin de siecle splendor--a combination you more often see up in the gold country.
NATIONAL
December 5, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
Brian Sanders, a charter boat captain in Everglades National Park in Florida, was returning from a fishing expedition when he thought he saw black kayaks trying to come ashore. After moving closer, he realized the strange black forms were pilot whales - and a few had beached themselves. "They were literally trying to swim out of the water onto the beach as far up as they could possibly go," he said. Since the Tuesday discovery in a shallow, remote part of the Everglades, more than 50 stranded short-finned pilot whales - spotted first by Sanders - have captured national attention and have so far defied experts' predictions of their likely deaths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A federal appeals court refused Tuesday to block a state law that bars possession, sale and distribution of shark fins ,  which are considered a delicacy in Chinese cuisine. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals let stand a decision by a district judge refusing to issue a preliminary injunction against the ban, which became effective in January. San Francisco's Chinatown Neighborhood Assn. and Asian Americans for Political Advancement  challenged the law on the grounds that it discriminated against Chinese Americans and hurt commerce.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Just when you thought “Shark Week” was over … Seems the folks in Hawaii are experiencing real-life reruns of the Discovery Channel's popular week of shows on the toothy denizens of the deep. On Sunday, a shark attacked a Big Island surfer. That came fresh on the heels of an attack on a German tourist off Maui on Wednesday; she lost an arm. And that makes eight attacks in Hawaiian waters this year, according to my colleague John M. Glionna. Now, true confession time: I watched quite a bit of “Shark Week.” (Not “Sharknado,” though; I still have some standards)
SCIENCE
July 5, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
Somewhere between 390 to 360 million years ago, a four-legged vertebrate, or tetrapod, crawled out of the water and gave rise to the amphibians, reptiles and mammals we see today. Scientists have established that this creature descended from fish and evolved its limbs and digits underwater, before its transition to dry ground. Life on land was accompanied by major modifications of the vertebrate skeleton, such as the evolution of a neck. Sandy Kawano, a graduate student at Clemson University, wondered how that transition from surf to turf might have happened - and she turned to modern animals to figure it out. Fossils of such science fiction muses as Ichthyostega , an early tetrapod, provide information on these organisms' appearance, but you can't get behavior out of old bones, Kawano said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Emily Gian has slashed prices on shark fins, the astoundingly expensive ingredient of a coveted and ceremonial soup, in hopes that she will sell out before a California ban on sale or possession of the delicacy takes effect Monday. "The law is unfair," said Gian, whose store in Los Angeles' Chinatown sells shark fins for $599 a pound. "Why single out Chinese people in California when shark fins are legal in many other states?" Across town, retired science teacher Judy Ki offers an answer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
An ancient Asian dining tradition comes to an end in California on Monday, and grocer Emily Gian is none too happy. Gian has slashed prices on shark fins, the astoundingly expensive ingredient of a coveted and ceremonial soup, in hopes she will sell out before a California ban on sale or possession of the delicacy takes effect Monday. "The law is unfair," said Gian, whose store in Los Angeles' Chinatown sells shark fins for $599 a pound. "Why single out Chinese people in California when shark fins are legal in many other states?"
BUSINESS
March 8, 1988 | DAVID OLMOS
Can't seem to stick with your exercise program? An Irvine health fitness equipment company has a product designed to motivate you with a high-tech twist. Life Fitness Inc., a division of Bally Manufacturing, has been marketing its computerized rowing machine, the Liferower, for about a year. An unusual feature of the rowing machine is a 13-inch color video screen resembling a computer video game. The screen depicts two racing sculls in the water.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2008 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
If you're facing years of student loan payments but aren't making much money because you're working in public service, the federal government has some good news for you. A law that takes effect Tuesday could allow you to have some of your college debt forgiven.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County's famous fin whale is enjoying a rare quiet morning - one last moment of serenity before its surroundings change completely. The 63-foot whale skeleton, which hung horizontally for more than 60 years in the museum's original 1913 building, is now suspended in a diving position from the ceiling of the nearly completed Otis Booth Pavilion. This is the museum's brand-new entrance, a six-story-high, multimedia-infused glass cube filled with sunlight and a view of surrounding greenery.
SCIENCE
May 21, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The march of the penguins seems to mock evolution. If Emperor penguins just got up and flew 40 miles, they could get to their mates in no time flat. Why would evolution abide a tedious waddle across the ice? It turns out there's method in the seeming madness of these blubbery short-winged pedestrian birds. Penguins long ago faced a steep trade-off between the high calorie costs of flight and low energy expenditure of using their wings to swim. They dived into an "adaptive fitness valley" of evolution that fly-and-dive ocean birds such as murres and cormorants still straddle, according to a team of Canadian and American zoologists.
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