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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2012 | Mike Boehm
Three Museum of Contemporary Art officials with key financial roles -- the chief operating officer, fundraising director and a trustee who chaired the board's finance committee -- have left MOCA in the last three months. They had been at their posts less than a year. Meanwhile, since Jeffrey Deitch became MOCA's director in mid-2010, efforts have stalled to pay down large deficits the museum incurred from 2000 to 2008 by illegally raiding its endowment. A source, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of MOCA's finances, said it has projected a deficit for the current fiscal year, which ends June 30. The spate of recent departures and two others in mid-2011 is "a turnover that begins to look like turmoil," MOCA's former chief executive, Charles E. Young, said this week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
More than 450   medical marijuana shops have filed renewals to pay Los Angeles business taxes this year - more than three times as many as are allowed to stay open under Proposition D. The new numbers won't settle the debate over how many medical marijuana businesses are now operating in Los Angeles. Additional pot shops may be open but have fallen delinquent on their taxes. Some may have never registered to pay taxes at all. But the numbers provide the latest hint at what has happened since Los Angeles voters passed new rules attempting to restrict medical marijuana shops.
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BUSINESS
June 29, 2008 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
If you're facing years of student loan payments but aren't making much money because you're working in public service, the federal government has some good news for you. A law that takes effect Tuesday could allow you to have some of your college debt forgiven.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - Stung by criminal cases involving three state senators, Democratic legislative leaders vowed Tuesday to reassess their campaign finance practices, and canceled a lucrative golf fundraiser scheduled for this weekend. The promise of self-scrutiny among Senate Democrats was just one way last week's criminal complaint against Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) detailing public corruption and arms trafficking charges continues to reverberate through the Capitol. Also on Tuesday, federal agents were again present in a legislative office building, searching a room used by Yee as an overflow office, according to Senate workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Owners of the controversial Riverside Freeway toll lanes are seeking to refinance the private thoroughfare in an attempt to lower their debt and eventually eliminate tolls for carpools, motorcyclists and the disabled. Greg Hulsizer, general manager of the 91 Express Lanes, said if the California Private Transportation Co. can refinance, the move will help push the 6-year-old operation closer to profitability.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Saudi Arabia remains the world's leading source of money for Al Qaeda and other extremist networks and has failed to take key steps requested by U.S. officials to stem the flow, the Bush administration's top financial counter-terrorism official said Tuesday. Stuart A.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2007 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
If you're renting a car over the holidays, chances are a clerk at the counter will try to sell you some pricey insurance options. Should you fork out the extra cash? Probably not, experts say. That's because there's a very good chance the auto insurance policy you already have would kick in if you had an accident while driving a rental. And sometimes the credit card you use to rent the car offers coverage too.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2008 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and Meg James, Chmielewski and James are Times staff writers.
Worried by the worsening economy, Kristen Olson decided she'd better start saving money. She tallied her expenses and was walloped by sticker shock: She and her roommates were spending $900 a year for cable TV. "I'm not watching $900 worth of cable," said the 25-year-old advertising account coordinator, who lives in North Hollywood. She's trying to persuade her roommates to drop the service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2008 | Carla Rivera, Rivera is a Times staff writer.
At the private New Roads School in Santa Monica, 20 families decided not to re-enroll in the fall because of financial nervousness. At Loyola High School near downtown, 40 families have come forward since the beginning of the school year seeking financial aid to help cover tuition costs, even as the school's endowment -- heavily invested in equities -- has taken a battering in the financial market.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Divorce can hurt the pocketbook in ways that some people don't expect. Lost income, child support, spousal support all hurt. But there are other ways that divorce affects finances, said Samantha Fraelich, vice president of Bernard R. Wolfe & Associates, a Chevy Chase, Md., wealth management firm. Here are five of them: Legal expenses: Be prepared to spend thousands of dollars on legal expenses, even if the divorce is amicable. If it's contested, expect to spend much more.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard and Walter Hamilton
Putting to rest one of its biggest remaining headaches, Bank of America Corp. has agreed to pay $9.5 billion to settle claims by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The government-sponsored mortgage finance giants had demanded compensation from the Charlotte, N.C., bank for losses on securities backed by faulty loans issued during the housing boom. The bank said the settlement, announced Wednesday, resolves all claims against BofA by the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the agency that regulates Fannie and Freddie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Catherine Saillant
In the first major debate of the campaign, four of the candidates vying to replace Zev Yaroslavsky on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors faced off Thursday in a debate that focused mostly on fundraising. It was an opportunity for key contenders to begin shaping their messages and distinguishing themselves from rivals before an audience on the UCLA campus. And they didn't hold back. The candidates discussed how best to work with a new sheriff to fix the county's crowded jails and how they plan to appeal to voters in the San Fernando Valley, where half the votes lie. But the most heated exchange came as they discussed the effect of money in the campaign, and how dollars are being raised.
OPINION
March 12, 2014 | By Lara Krupicka
The iconic Statue of Liberty, positioned in New York Harbor to welcome those entering the United States, stands as a symbol of what's best about our country and the freedom it has offered so many. But it was only when I visited Lady Liberty for the first time recently that I discovered something else she represents: an early example of crowdfunding. A display in the museum on Liberty Island describes how, in 1885, Joseph Pulitzer ran an appeal to readers of his newspaper the New York World for funds to build the statue's pedestal.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - Congressional efforts to shut down bailed-out Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac took a significant step forward with bipartisan agreement from key senators on a plan to overhaul the housing finance system. The proposal released Tuesday would slowly shrink the companies and replace them with a scaled-back government guarantee for mortgages. Details are expected to be disclosed in the coming days. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which together own or guarantee about 60% of existing mortgages, were seized by the federal government in 2008 as they neared bankruptcy from bad loans they guaranteed during the subprime housing boom.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Millennials stand out among other generations for their optimism over personal finances and America's future, according to a new national survey released Friday by the Pew Research Center. But the upbeat thinking among the 18-to-33-year-old crowd is also marked by near or at record levels of detachment and distrust of traditional institutions, the report also said. “Millennials are forging a distinctive path into adulthood. " said Paul Taylor, Pew Research Center's executive vice president for special projects and author of the new book "The Next America.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2014 | By Lorraine Ali
Hany Abu-Assad should be used to the tension by now. The Palestinian director has shot most of his films ("Paradise Now," "Rana's Wedding") in a region known far more for its conflict than its cinema, and his story lines often take place in between tangles of barbed wire and crowded checkpoints. But filming "Omar" on the West Bank and in his hometown of Nazareth almost proved too much - even for Abu-Assad. "At the end of the shoot, I told everybody, 'I'm not going to make another movie,'" said the director.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Millennials stand out among other generations for their optimism over personal finances and America's future, according to a new national survey released Friday by the Pew Research Center. But the upbeat thinking among the 18-to-33-year-old crowd is also marked by near or at record levels of detachment and distrust of traditional institutions, the report also said. “Millennials are forging a distinctive path into adulthood. " said Paul Taylor, Pew Research Center's executive vice president for special projects and author of the new book "The Next America.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2012
As your parents grow older, you may start wondering if they have enough money to sustain their lifestyle and protect them in case of problems. But many people find it difficult and awkward to ask Mom and Dad about their finances. Here are some tips to make that discussion easier: 1. Look for a subtle invitation. "Sometimes parents will signal when they want to have 'The Talk,'" wrote Jeff D. Opdyke in his book, "Protecting Your Parents' Money. " The parent may, for example, start complaining about stock market losses, a large medical bill or the cost of replacing a car. "Such comments might well be a parent's way of trying to draw you into a conversation they've wanted to have with you for a while.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
A Venice company whose technology helps brands find their most passionate YouTube fans and incorporate their enthusiast videos into marketing campaigns has attracted $30 million in new funding. Zefr attracted the fresh round of financing from a group of investors led by Institutional Venture Partners, a  late-stage venture capital fund that previously backed Netflix, Snapchat and Twitter. The fund's general partner, Dennis Phelps, will join Zefr's board. “The new investors believe it has the potential to be a billion-dollar business, and I believe that too,” said Mark Terbeek, who led an early investment in the company.
WORLD
February 24, 2014 | By Tom Kington
ROME -- In the most concrete sign to date of his intention to reform the Vatican, Pope Francis announced the creation Monday of a single authority to handle all business, administrative and personnel management at the Holy See, a response to the rash of financial scandals that have tarnished the Roman Catholic Church's reputation among believers and nonbelievers. The new Secretariat for the Economy will draw up the Vatican's annual budget, call on lay experts for advice and launch surprise internal audits.
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