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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Rising college costs are weighing more heavily on students, with increasing numbers rejecting their first choice and opting instead for the school offering a solid financial aid package, according to a UCLA survey released Wednesday. Freshmen who indicated that education costs were a "very important" factor in their college choice reached a record high of 46% -- up nearly 15 percentage points since 2004, according to the survey of the nation's first-year students conducted by UCLA's Higher Education Research Institute . Only 57% of students enrolled in their first-choice campus in 2013, the lowest level since the item was first measured in 1974.
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OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By Andrew Cockburn
In 1919, after allied sanctions on food shipments had starved the Kaiser's Germany into submission, President Wilson endorsed the continued use of sanctions to settle international disputes as an "economic, peaceful, silent, deadly remedy. " Almost a century later, the weapon is more popular than ever, mostly because of a wholly mistaken belief that it makes the targets do what we want. Currently, the United States is enforcing no fewer than 24 separate sanctions regimes directed at targets ranging from the Balkans to Zimbabwe.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Ten U.S. colleges and universities have committed to provide more information to students about tuition and other costs, including estimated monthly loan payments after graduation, as part of a federal push to improve disclosure to help prevent financial-aid recipients from overextending themselves, the White House said. Leaders from those institutions, which include the state university systems in Maryland, Massachusetts, New York and Texas, were scheduled meet Tuesday in Washington with Vice President Joe Biden, Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to discuss financial aid transparency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Rising college costs are weighing more heavily on students, with increasing numbers rejecting their first choice and opting instead for the school offering a solid financial aid package, according to a UCLA survey released Wednesday. Freshmen who indicated that education costs were a "very important" factor in their college choice reached a record high of 46% -- up nearly 15 percentage points since 2004, according to the survey of the nation's first-year students conducted by UCLA's Higher Education Research Institute . Only 57% of students enrolled in their first-choice campus in 2013, the lowest level since the item was first measured in 1974.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
World leaders agreed Friday to provide financial support to the newly forming governments of Tunisia and Egypt, adopting President Obama's plan to help build lasting democracies in those countries. As they wrapped up their annual summit here, leaders of the Group of 8 industrialized nations directed the International Monetary Fund to provide loans and other financial support. Although they did not commit to specific pledges of financial assistance individually, the leaders suggested they would do so either in direct loans or debt forgiveness or through contributions to international banks and funds.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Here is a roundup of alleged cons, frauds and schemes to watch out for. Financial aid - The Better Business Bureau is warning college students and their families to use caution when dealing with companies that promise to help secure scholarships or financial assistance for college. Of particular concern, the BBB said in a recent bulletin, are firms that ask for an upfront fee for help in securing financial assistance for college. In one recent scam, students were notified that they were finalists for a scholarship but needed to pay a fee in order to be considered.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2008 | Kathy M. Kristof, Personal Finance
One of the many challenges of sending a child through school now sits in a pile on Joseph Han's desk. Han, a Garden Grove legal assistant, is the father of an honors student at Pacifica High School in Orange County who was accepted at a litany of great universities -- Berkeley, UCLA, Pomona College and UC San Diego, to name a few. Because he applied for financial aid, each university sent Han a page-long "financial aid notification" that explains...
BUSINESS
September 4, 1989 | BILL SING
Average per-student costs for the 1988-89 school year totaled more than $12,500 at private colleges and almost $6,200 at public institutions, according to the American Council on Education, a nonprofit research group in Washington. That included tuition, fees, room and board, transportation, books and supplies. Education costs have been rising much faster than inflation.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2011 | Kathy M. Kristof, Personal Finance
As high school seniors watch their mailboxes waiting for thick envelopes that signal a college acceptance, their parents wait for another form of communication from schools ? financial aid award letters. Those letters describe what aid, if any, is being offered to reduce the high cost of a college education. But in some cases, the letters are so dizzyingly complex that students and their families misunderstand what they're being offered. "I've seen students misinterpreting the award letter, thinking that they're getting a free ride," said Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of Finaid.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2012 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: You write about it not being a good idea in many cases to pay off your mortgage, but does it make sense to do so to reduce savings so that we can be in a better position to help our high school junior get financial aid for college in a year? We also have a 529 and some investments and are savers. Answer: Your income matters far more to financial aid calculations than your savings, said Lynn O'Shaughnessy, author of "The College Solution: A Guide for Everyone Looking for the Right School at the Right Price (2nd Edition)
WORLD
March 3, 2014 | By Paul Richter and Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - Russia's military action in Crimea has strengthened support for economic aid to beleaguered Ukraine, yet the multibillion-dollar package under discussion in world capitals still must navigate a treacherous course. With Russian troops now essentially in control of Ukraine's Crimean peninsula, President Obama challenged lawmakers who have been demanding tough action to start with an aid package to help shore up the fledgling government in Kiev, the Ukrainian capital. Obama said Monday that he'd heard "a lot of talk from Congress about what should be done.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: We have a son who is a high school junior and who is planning on going to college. We met with a college financial planner who suggested we put money in a whole life insurance policy as a way to help get more financial aid. Is that a good idea? Answer: Your "college financial planner" is actually an insurance salesperson who hopes to make a big commission by talking you into an expensive policy you probably don't need. The salesperson is correct that buying a cash-value life insurance policy is one way to hide assets from college financial planning formulas.
SPORTS
February 27, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
A table buried in a 230-page federal court filing stamped "highly confidential" details part of the facilities arms race overtaking college athletics. Unsealed earlier this week in Ed O'Bannon's antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA, the table shows schools spent more than $5 billion since 1997 to construct or upgrade athletics facilities. That figure might be conservative. Roger Noll, professor emeritus of economics at Stanford University, prepared the report last September on behalf of the plaintiffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Melanie Mason, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
SACRAMENTO -- Lawmakers announced a new bill Tuesday that would streamline the college financial aid application process, in hopes of increasing high school students' access to higher-education cash. Under the measure by Assemblyman Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), school districts would be required to electronically submit verified grade-point averages of graduating 12th-grade students to the California Student Aid Commission, the agency that administers the financial aid program Cal Grants.
OPINION
February 13, 2014
Re "Deep in student debt," Opinion, Feb. 10 Sarah Amandolare is troubled by "gapping" - colleges' practice of admitting students without awarding enough financial aid to make a school affordable. The vast majority of the nation's colleges have no other option. Out of thousands of U.S. colleges and universities, fewer than 70 claim they will meet a student's full financial need. Many of these schools have hefty endowment funds. Others use less-generous estimates of what the student can pay, which often means a gap between what the college and the family think is affordable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
California Community college students will have to meet minimum academic standards to receive financial assistance under new rules approved by the system Monday. The California Community Colleges Board of Governors voted to require that students maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA for two consecutive terms and complete at least half of their units with a D grade or better to receive a fee waiver. Community college fees are currently $46 per unit, among the lowest in the nation. Of the state's 2.6 million community college students, about 40% have their fees waived.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis, Times Staff Writer
Some of the poorest elderly and disabled people admitted to this country on humanitarian grounds will lose their cash assistance in October unless they have naturalization applications pending, federal officials say. Letters have been sent to 3,800 recipients of Supplemental Security Income, including some in California, warning them that their eligibility for the federal program could end Sept. 30, said Lowell Kepke, a spokesman for the Social Security Administration. The deadline has caused concern among refugee advocates, who point out that some of these legal immigrants aren't able to pass the citizenship exam or can't yet apply because of delays processing their green cards.
WORLD
March 3, 2014 | By Paul Richter and Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - Russia's military action in Crimea has strengthened support for economic aid to beleaguered Ukraine, yet the multibillion-dollar package under discussion in world capitals still must navigate a treacherous course. With Russian troops now essentially in control of Ukraine's Crimean peninsula, President Obama challenged lawmakers who have been demanding tough action to start with an aid package to help shore up the fledgling government in Kiev, the Ukrainian capital. Obama said Monday that he'd heard "a lot of talk from Congress about what should be done.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2014 | By Jason Song
When Alma Renteria attended Lynwood High School, one of her best friends was a gifted soccer player and math student. "I thought he'd be an engineer," she said. But her friend was taking too few classes to fulfill requirements and barely graduated. Then he entered community college and quickly dropped out. "He had a lot of potential, but he just didn't know what to expect," said Renteria, who graduated from Lynwood in 2008 and is now a member of the school district's board. To help students look toward continuing their educations, district officials including Renteria put on an annual alumni fair.
OPINION
January 9, 2014 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
In 1975, Nebraska Sen. Roman Hruska warned a congressional hearing that college football was in mortal danger. The threat came from Title IX, the 1972 measure that outlawed sex discrimination in educational institutions receiving federal financial assistance. To comply with the law, Hruska feared, colleges would have to equalize athletic budgets for male and female sports, and the only way to do that would be to raid the football budget. "Are we going to let Title IX kill the goose that lays the golden eggs in those colleges and universities with a major revenue-producing sport?"
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