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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1994 | CONSTANCE SOMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Ventura County residents who want to enroll in community colleges are failing to do so, unaware that financial aid is available or because they cannot get school loans processed in time, a new study has found.
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BUSINESS
May 29, 1986
Reeta Dee Hunt has been appointed Program Coordinator by the National Center for Financial Education.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
Guess how many Americans correctly answered this basic financial question: Is the stock of a single company usually safer than a mutual fund? A) 100% B) 80% C) 60% D) None of the above. The right answer is D. Barely 1 in 2 people knew that a single stock is not safer than a mutual fund, which holds many stocks. The question, included in a survey by a pair of college professors, underscores a fundamental problem facing millions of Americans. At a time when the world of personal finance is increasingly complex - and when people are more responsible than ever for their own financial future - Americans' understanding of basic concepts is sorely lacking.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2004 | E. Scott Reckard
Federal bank regulators planned to roll out a Vietnamese-language version of their Money Smart financial-education program today in partnership with community leaders in Orange County's Little Saigon. The 10-session Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. program includes tips on using credit, the importance of savings and checking accounts and home ownership. It also examines how to avoid abusive and deceptive lenders as well as the high cost of payday loans and check-cashing operations.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2008
The Sunday Business section gave a prime example of why the California budget is such a mess. In the story "Teacher needs financial education" (Money Makeover, Aug. 24) was a line about the person being advised that as a state employee, she would get a pension of $6,880 a month at the age of 55. Yikes! We taxpayers are on the hook for over $80,000 a year for someone who can retire at age 55. Let's hope they don't vote to increase the pensions or we'll really be in trouble.
NEWS
August 26, 1992 | DENISE GELLENE
Bad credit cannot be repaired, but credit can be rebuilt over time. The National Center for Financial Education, a nonprofit organization in San Diego, recommends that people trying to improve their credit take the following steps: * Open a savings account and make steady deposits. Lenders look for people who have enough discipline to save. * Open a checking account, but never overdraw it. Checks returned for insufficient funds can show up on credit reports.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2003 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
Investor education has never been a top priority for state spending in California, and that's truer than ever in these budget-strapped times. Lacking specific funding for educational outreach, the Department of Corporations, the state securities regulator, runs occasional seminars and workshops at which enforcement officials offer tips on avoiding investment scams, according to spokeswoman Kam Coveyou. The agency also provides information by mail and over its Web site, at www.corp.ca.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2008 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
See Sally. See Sally run from the bank. Run Sally run. In the midst of one of the worst banking crises in decades, the U.S. Treasury Department today will launch a long-planned program to teach young Americans about credit and other financial matters. The theme of the campaign: "Don't let your credit put you in a bad place." Like in bankruptcy court? Don Iannicola, the department's deputy assistant secretary for financial education, tried to put the best face on the timing of the announcement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2006 | Dave Carpenter, Associated Press
Being a struggling artist isn't what it used to be. In fact, it might be worse. Andrew Falkowski thinks so, and it's easy to understand why. The suburban Chicago resident and his wife have a combined five art degrees and six figures in debt because of them. "Van Gogh was simply broke -- he didn't have $100,000 in debt," says the 32-year-old Falkowski, who makes text paintings but works weekdays as a medical receptionist to make ends meet. "We all should be so lucky."
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