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BUSINESS
May 27, 2007 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
For Los Angeles newlyweds Joseph and Jamie Horton, the deal looked too good to pass up: a mortgage with an initial 1.75% interest rate and payments that wouldn't adjust for five years. The Hortons figured that with all the money they would save on interest payments, they would be able to pay down a significant chunk of the principal on their loan. So they signed on the dotted line. But after a month, the actual interest rate on their "option" ARM shot above 8%.
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NEWS
February 26, 2014
Chris Avetisian was named senior vice president and chief financial officer of the Los Angeles Times in February 2008. Most of his career has been in publishing, with almost 30 years of business experience at The Times. Since 1978, Avetisian has worked in the operations, administration and finance departments at The Times. Most recently, he served as director of financial planning, where he coordinated all planning and capital needs of The Times. Avetisian's interest in business and the community led to his appointment to the Board of Directors of the Pacific Symphony in 2007.
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BUSINESS
May 31, 2013 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: My spouse has tenure at a university. Given that one of us will always be employed, should we change the way we look at the amount of money we keep in an emergency fund or our risk tolerance for investments? Answer: Even tenured professors can get fired or laid off. Tenure was designed to protect academic freedom, but professors can lose their jobs because of serious misconduct, incompetence or economic cutbacks, such as when a department is eliminated or a whole university is closed.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2014 | Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
When Liz Davidson told friends 15 years ago that she was quitting her job running a hedge fund, they thought she was misguided. Then Davidson revealed her new career plan, and they thought she was really nuts. She launched a company that gives financial guidance to average Americans through their jobs. Employers hire Financial Finesse Inc. to provide group workshops and one-on-one counseling to workers on topics such as debt management, college savings and elder care. It was a noble goal but a long shot.
NEWS
October 20, 1988
A six-week pilot program to teach Gahr High School students "the nuts and bolts" of financial planning begins today. The High School Financial Planning Program will be taught once a week for six weeks to 32 students in the geometry class of math teacher Rick Renaker. The class is part of a nationwide effort to teach young adults the basic techniques of personal finance and sound money management, said Aaron Bergner, a certified financial planner in the Long Beach office of PaineWebber Group Inc.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1990 | RICHARD O'REILLY, RICHARD O'REILLY is director of computer analysis for The Times
It's January. Holiday bills will show up any day. Chances are you don't think you've got any money to worry about managing now. But if you've ever thought about computerizing your personal finances, now is the best time to start because you'll be able to enter data gradually as it accumulates through the year. The later in the year you start, the larger the backlog of checks, receipts and portfolio transactions you'll have to grapple with all at once.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | EVAN CUMMINGS
Living the single life can be expensive. Food, shelter, clothing, taxes, insurance, even pleasurable pastimes--vacations and entertainment--cost more when you're alone. But you don't have to wait for Mr. or Ms. Right--or earn a six-figure salary--to build a firm financial base, says Victoria Felton-Collins, a certified financial planner. As a partner of Felton-Collins, Woodhouse & Associates in Costa Mesa, she regularly advises people from all income levels.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2001
Alvin Hall, a financial consultant and author, headlines a financial planning and investing seminar for African Americans tonight in downtown Los Angeles. Hall, known for his books on the fundamentals of stock and mutual fund investing, joins five other speakers to discuss the basics of financial planning and investing. The event, scheduled for 6 to 9 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency Los Angeles, is presented in part by Black Enterprise magazine and Ethcentric ethnicity-focused Internet services.
NEWS
August 5, 1997
August C. "Gus" Hansch, an insurance executive who became a pioneer in the financial planning industry and wrote a manual called "Controlling Tomorrow," has died. He was 76. Hansch died July 29 in Del Mar after a long respiratory illness. He and his brothers Walter and Noel and friend Bill McMurry created Hansch Financial Group and the Financial Advisory Clinic, which sell materials through the subsidiary Financial Profiles Inc.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA
Financial planning can be a daunting task for the novice and experienced investor alike. Providing an opportunity to cut through some of the confusion and complex choices confronting individuals, UC Irvine Extension and The Times Orange County are sponsoring the first Financial Planning and Investments Conference on April 25 in Anaheim.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2013 | By Shan Li
Ray Irani, once the highest paid executive in the oil industry, is getting a $14-million lump sum as part of a $26-million settlement after being ousted as chairman of Occidental Petroleum Corp. Irani, who joined the Los Angeles oil company in 1983 and was pushed out as chairman in May, also will continue receiving lifetime security and financial planning services estimated at as much as $1.3 million a year, Occidental said Monday in a securities regulatory filing. The 78-year-old former executive has been paid an average of $90 million a year in total compensation since 2002, according to data compiled by The Los Angeles Times.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2013 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: My spouse has tenure at a university. Given that one of us will always be employed, should we change the way we look at the amount of money we keep in an emergency fund or our risk tolerance for investments? Answer: Even tenured professors can get fired or laid off. Tenure was designed to protect academic freedom, but professors can lose their jobs because of serious misconduct, incompetence or economic cutbacks, such as when a department is eliminated or a whole university is closed.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
It's the new retirement: More than four in 10 Americans think they'll have to work into their 70s or 80s because they can't afford to retire, according to a new survey. One in 10 people expects to toil into their 80s, while 32% expect to be on the job into their 70s, according to the report by insurer Northwestern Mutual. On average, those surveyed expect to leave work at age 68. However, the report points out, that doesn't jibe with reality. The mean age of those already retired is 59, the study said.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2013 | By Lisa Zamosky
For seniors and their families, Alzheimer's disease and its hefty price tag are an increasingly scary prospect. About 5.4 million Americans are affected by Alzheimer's disease, making it the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Because of growing life expectancies and aging baby boomers, that number is expected to triple by 2050. Alayna Tillman's mother and aunt both have Alzheimer's disease and live with Tillman, her husband and two sons in Lake View Terrace. Tillman says Medicare pays for many of the medical costs her mom and aunt incur.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
Of all the challenges individual investors face, one of the toughest is finding a good financial planner. As a generation of do-it-yourself investors grows older and their financial lives get more complex, many people are realizing they want a human touch. Though they're comfortable researching investments on the Internet, they want some level of guidance from a planner. "People say, 'Look, I know what I'm doing but I just had a kid' or 'I've gotten a bonus at work and money is now more important to me. It's more serious,'" said Jon Stein, founder of investment website Betterment.com.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2011 | Kathy M. Kristof, Personal Finance
Year-end financial planning is probably the last thing you want to think about while you're whipping up eggnog. But spend a few minutes now and you can save a bundle on your taxes. "No one wants to make the time at this time of year," says Philip J. Holthouse, partner at the Los Angeles tax law and accounting firm of Holthouse Carlin & Van Trigt. "But a little last-minute planning can reap rewards worth thousands of dollars. " Charitable contributions: Gifts to charity soar near the holidays.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1987 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Price Waterhouse said Wednesday that it will register an affiliate as an investment adviser with the Securities and Exchange Commission, becoming the first Big Eight accounting firm to do so and signaling the growing presence of accounting firms in the lucrative field of financial planning. The filing, expected to be made today, will allow Price Waterhouse to provide and advertise financial planning as a separate service apart from its traditional tax planning and accounting services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1999 | REGINA HONG
The Presbyterian Church of the Covenant in Costa Mesa at 2850 Fairview Road is holding a free seminar about financial planning Sunday at 11:30 a.m. A church member, attorney and financial advisor will explain estate planning, wills and family trusts as well as ways to donate to churches and nonprofit organizations, seminar organizer Wayne Rexrode said. "We want people to plan as intelligently as they can, and part of the plan is to benefit the church," he said.
SPORTS
January 7, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
Dodgers owner Frank McCourt met for three days this week with executives from the commissioner's office as Bud Selig considers options that could complicate McCourt's ability to remain in control of the team. McCourt met with several of Selig's lieutenants ? but not with the commissioner himself ? from Monday through Wednesday at Major League Baseball headquarters in New York, according to three high-ranking officials familiar with the discussions but not authorized to talk about them.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2009 | Jim Puzzanghera
President Obama's plan to increase the authority of the Federal Reserve is emerging as a major stumbling block to congressional approval of his overhaul of financial industry regulations. The Fed already faces bipartisan criticism for being too powerful, overly secretive and negligent in protecting the economy from the severe recession. And lawmakers didn't let up on the agency in a hearing Thursday as Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner began to sell the president's changes.
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