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June 16, 2010 | James Rainey
At Bar Marmont late Monday and into Tuesday's wee hours, the Chivas flowed, tuxedo ties came loose and conversation burbled. Executives for some of the world's top luxury brands made the scene, along with guests of … what's that? … a newspaper? Yes, a newspaper — or, more accurately, a multi-platform journalistic enterprise — brought investors, marketers, entrepreneurs and other luminaries together this week to rub elbows and consider subjects such as overcoming extravagance guilt and "the narrative behind the luxury purchase."
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 5, 2013 | By David Pierson
China already consumes half the world's pork. But to ensure it has a steady supply of hogs, it's struck a deal with Britain to import $73.5 million worth of premium pig semen. The agreement was brokered with the help of British Prime Minister David Cameron, who just completed a three-day visit to China. “We're doing all we can to ensure that businesses up and down the country reap the rewards from our relationship with China. And that includes our pig farmers,” said a statement from Cameron's office, according to the Financial Times . “This new deal to export pig semen will mean Britain's best pigs will help sustain the largest pig population in the world.” The pig semen, both frozen and fresh, will reportedly be flown in starting early next year.
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BUSINESS
October 6, 2003
Beginning today, the Business section will feature selected articles from the Financial Times focusing on international business and the world economy. The roundup will appear on Page C3 each Monday. Financial Times stories will appear on other days and in other sections as well. The Los Angeles Times offers these reports through a partnership with the Financial Times, one of the world's leading business newspapers.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2013 | By Alana Semuels and Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- It's a battle between one of the nation's largest newspapers and what is suspected to be a group of hackers supporting Syrian President Bashar Assad, and for the moment at least, the hackers appear to be winning. The New York Times website was down for large parts of Tuesday after being hacked in an attack for which the group known as the Syrian Electronic Army took credit, and was down again as of 9 a.m. EDT Wednesday. Users trying to access www.nytimes.com received a message saying the server could not be found.
NEWS
September 4, 1993
Max Henry Fisher, 71, former editor of the Financial Times and the executive credited with transforming that newspaper into Britain's leading financial newspaper and an influential European journal. A native of Germany, Fisher was interned in Britain as an enemy alien at the outbreak of war and later sent to Australia. When he was released in 1942, he volunteered for the British army and served in France.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1988 | Associated Press
Publisher Rupert Murdoch said he would like to form a joint venture with Pearson PLC, owners of the Financial Times, to publish a separate U.S. edition of the newspaper, according to a report published Wednesday. Murdoch was quoted in the Financial Times as saying he would like to compete more effectively in the United States with the Wall Street Journal, which is owned by Dow Jones & Co. "For the Financial Times to be selling 18,000 copies a day here is ridiculous," Murdoch said.
NEWS
September 11, 1997 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Newspaper giveaways are nothing new in New York, as the four dailies periodically promote home delivery, show off improvements or remind nonreaders what they're missing. But the broadsheet being handed out Tuesday at Penn Station, Rockefeller Center, subway stops and suburban train stations came on salmon-colored paper, seemed wider than the New York Times and had an offshore focus despite its commuter surroundings.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1990 | FROM TIMES WIRE SERVICES
The editor of the Financial Times, Sir Geoffrey Owen, is stepping down after 10 years in the job, the newspaper said today. Owen will be succeeded in January by the present deputy editor, Richard Lambert. A statement issued by the Financial Times said Owen, 56, will join the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics next April.
NEWS
April 19, 1995
Alan Hare, 76, a distinguished soldier-spy who later turned Britain's Financial Times into a leading international business newspaper. Hare operated in Albania during World War II and spent one winter sharing a cave with the country's future Communist leader, Enver Hoxha. Hare lost several toes and was awarded Great Britain's Military Cross. After the war, he worked as a free-lance journalist before joining the Secret Intelligence Service in 1948.
BOOKS
December 25, 1988 | Alan Bell, Bell is librarian of Rhodes House, Oxford, and a regular reviewer for the (London) Times Literary Supplement.
The Financial Times occupies a unique position in the British newspaper world, comparable to the Wall Street Journal, its much more narrowly focused rival for journalistic command of the international bourse .
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Political comedy isn't what it used to be, but what shtickmeister could compete with the running gags of those currently holding office? David Mamet took up the challenge and came up short with his Oval Office farce "November," leadenly staged last fall at the Mark Taper Forum. Now we have "Yes, Prime Minister" trying to tickle audiences at the Geffen Playhouse with the behind-the-scenes machinations of the British government. Written by Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, the team that co-created the popular BBC television series "Yes Minister" and "Yes, Prime Minister," the show redeploys the characters from those programs to satirize a political system in which civil servants pride themselves on being both the puppet masters and the cleanup squad of a benighted prime minister.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By David Ng
There have been a number of stage plays devoted to the lives of visual artists -- Georges Seurat, Pablo Picasso and Mark Rothko have all received the grand theatrical treatment. But Chinese artist Ai Weiwei is unlike the others in that he is a bonafide online phenomenon in addition to being a creative force. Howard Brenton's #aiww: The Arrest of Ai Weiwei" -- the hashtag refers to the artist's prolific Twitter habit -- opened last week in London at the Hampstead Theatre. The English-language play is based on the book by journalist Barnaby Martin and features British actor Benedict Wong as the artist.  The plot focuses on Ai's 81 days in secret detention in 2011, and the relationship that formed between the artist and his guards.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Reports from Bloomberg and the Financial Times say dozens of people became sick after eating last month at Noma in Copenhagen, known for its modern Nordic cuisine and often referred to as "the best restaurant in the world. " Danish food inspectors said 63 diners who ate there from Feb. 12 to 16 were ill with vomiting and diarrhea and a kitchen employee also was sickened.  [ Correction, March 9: An earlier version of this post cited a report stating 63 of a total 78 diners were affected; there were a total of 435 guests.]
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
WASHINGTON -- A top Republican donor and outspoken critic of the Dodd-Frank financial reforms has called on Mitt Romney to pursue tougher regulations and force big banks to be more transparent. Paul Singer, a billionaire hedge fund manager and chairman of Elliott Associates, recently raised the issue with Romney officials, according to the Financial Times, when he sent the officials his firm's quarterly investor letter, which argues that a financial “black hole” looms without tougher controls on banks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2011 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- Republican state Sen. Sam Blakeslee said Friday that he had reached into his own pocket to buy the luxury SUV originally purchased with public funds for his official use, including the commute between Sacramento and his San Luis Obispo district. After ordering the $39,975 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid with heated leather seats — one of the most expensive choices by a senator during these tough economic times, it turned out — Blakeslee apparently suffered buyer's remorse and wanted to drive something more modest.  But the dealership wouldn't take the car back.  So the Senate Rules Committee got stuck with the vehicle, using it as a high-end taxi to shuttle lawmakers to and from the airport.  A quick resale was ruled out because, like all new vehicles, the Lincoln lost a considerable amount of value as soon as it was driven off the lot. "To ensure a responsible resolution and no cost to the taxpayer, Blakeslee has personally bought the car from Senate Rules at the original purchase price," his spokeswoman, Erin Shaw, wrote in an email to The Times on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2010 | James Rainey
At Bar Marmont late Monday and into Tuesday's wee hours, the Chivas flowed, tuxedo ties came loose and conversation burbled. Executives for some of the world's top luxury brands made the scene, along with guests of … what's that? … a newspaper? Yes, a newspaper — or, more accurately, a multi-platform journalistic enterprise — brought investors, marketers, entrepreneurs and other luminaries together this week to rub elbows and consider subjects such as overcoming extravagance guilt and "the narrative behind the luxury purchase."
BUSINESS
July 2, 1988 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
MTM Entertainment, the television production company founded in 1970 by actress Mary Tyler Moore and her then-husband Grant Tinker, reportedly is being sold to a small British television production firm called Television South for about $325 million. Neither MTM nor Television South (TVS) would confirm the deal, which was reported Friday by the Financial Times of London. "The company cannot comment on speculation or rumor," a spokesman for Studio City-based MTM said Friday.
WORLD
December 10, 2009 | By Henry Chu
Tapping into widespread public anger, the British government Wednesday unveiled a one-time tax on bankers' bonuses to discourage big year-end rewards and to wrestle back some of the taxpayer money that went into bailing out the financial sector. Any bonus exceeding 25,000 pounds, or about $41,000, will be hit with a 50% levy under the new policy announced by Alistair Darling, Britain's chancellor of the exchequer. Darling told Parliament the tax was only fair because the government injected billions of pounds into the banking system to help it stay afloat through the global financial crisis.
TRAVEL
October 25, 2009 | Jen Leo
This is not your average online news aggregator. Eugen Beer handpicks timely, travel-related news articles from a variety of well-respected media sources and highlights them on one page at the website 27Clouds. What's hot: The front page of 27Clouds engages readers with travel news headlines, corresponding photos and links to travel news articles from big media players such as NPR, the Economist, Financial Times, Guardian, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Sydney Morning Herald and more.
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