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September 12, 1995 | John Burton, The Financial Times
The California economy produces more goods and services annually than Canada. And with each passing year, its prosperity becomes increasingly linked to its success in the global economy. As the state approaches a new millennium, it faces challenges that will help determine whether it will become an even bigger economic force in the world or whether it will fade amid mounting problems at home. Financial Times correspondents, based both here and in capitals abroad, give their impressions on the California economy through a special lens.
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NEWS
September 12, 1995
California's population at the turn of the century will be bigger and more diverse than ever. Latinos are the fastest-growing group, while whites will record the slowest growth rate. A look at California's ethnic makeup and some predictions about its population as a whole: * Total population: 1990: 29.98 million White: 57.4% Latino: 25.9% Black: 7.0% Other 10.0% * 2000: 36.44 million White: 50.7% Latino: 31.6% Black: 7.0% Other 11.
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | DAVID NEIMAN
The worlds of entertainment and technology are moving ever closer together. Digital advancements are already revolutionizing every facet of Hollywood, from project germination to post production, and the future promises innovations limited only by what creative minds can imagine. TELECOM Regional phone companies such as Pacific Telesis, Bell Atlantic and Nynex will be looking to buy and produce programming, in addition to offering services such as movies on demand and home shopping systems.
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
One of the more perplexing aspects of California is its sense of impermanence, the fear inside the state that its economy will dry up and blow away. Then there is the smug belief--indeed, the green-eyed hope--in the rest of the country that prosperous California will go into long-term decline. The truth is very different. California's economy is not only big--it's the seventh- or eighth-largest in the world, with almost $900 billion a year in total output. It is a driving force of the whole U.S.
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