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BUSINESS
September 9, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hyundai Motor America Inc., the South Korean auto importer that has been struggling with weak sales and management turnover, on Tuesday named Finbarr O'Neill as its president and chief executive. O'Neill, 46, had been serving as the Fountain Valley company's interim chief operating officer since Robert Parker abruptly resigned in February. A lawyer and former Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. executive, O'Neill has been Hyundai Motor America's general counsel since the company was formed in 1985.
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BUSINESS
January 5, 2005 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Finbarr O'Neill, the automotive turnaround whiz hired 16 months ago to work his magic on ailing Mitsubishi Motors North America Inc., has resigned after a yearlong plunge in the company's sales. The Cypress-based unit of Japan's Mitsubishi Motors Corp. named Rich Gilligan, head of its North American manufacturing operation, to replace O'Neill as president and chief executive. Industry analysts said O'Neill's departure wasn't likely to signal the demise of Mitsubishi in the U.S.
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AUTOS
October 30, 2002 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Finbarr O'Neill, Hyundai Motor America's chief executive, has been named one of the "rising stars" of American business by Fast Company, a management magazine that's been publishing an annual "Who's Fast" list for the last five years. O'Neill is the only automotive executive on the list this year and made it into the November issue byvirtue of the Hyundai turnaround that he's helped engineer since taking the reins in 1998.
AUTOS
October 30, 2002 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Finbarr O'Neill, Hyundai Motor America's chief executive, has been named one of the "rising stars" of American business by Fast Company, a management magazine that's been publishing an annual "Who's Fast" list for the last five years. O'Neill is the only automotive executive on the list this year and made it into the November issue byvirtue of the Hyundai turnaround that he's helped engineer since taking the reins in 1998.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2005 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Finbarr O'Neill, the automotive turnaround whiz hired 16 months ago to work his magic on ailing Mitsubishi Motors North America Inc., has resigned after a yearlong plunge in the company's sales. The Cypress-based unit of Japan's Mitsubishi Motors Corp. named Rich Gilligan, head of its North American manufacturing operation, to replace O'Neill as president and chief executive. Industry analysts said O'Neill's departure wasn't likely to signal the demise of Mitsubishi in the U.S.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2003 | John O'Dell
Hyundai Motor America Inc. said that Robert F. Cosmai, former vice president of national sales, has been appointed to serve as acting president and chief executive. Cosmai fills a vacancy created last week when Finbarr O'Neill, president of the Fountain Valley-based U.S. arm of South Korea's Hyundai Motor Corp. since 1998, quit to become head of troubled Mitsubishi North America in Cypress.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Mitsubishi Motors Corp., whose U.S. auto sales have dropped by more than half in two years, hired a Michigan-based turnaround specialist to revive its North American automotive business. Mitsubishi brought in AlixPartners to advise executives over the next several months, said Dotty Diemer, a spokeswoman for Cypress-based Mitsubishi Motors North America. Japan's fifth-largest automaker this month promoted Rich Gilligan, 61, to run its North American sales and production unit after the Jan.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1999 | John O'Dell
Hyundai Motor America said it has shelved plans to import a minivan for that already crowded niche in the U.S. market and instead will focus on marketing the sport-utility vehicle it will introduce here in the spring of 2000. Finbarr O'Neill, president of the Fountain Valley-based U.S. arm of South Korea's largest car maker, said the minivan was abandoned because it was designed for the European and Asian markets and simply was not good enough for the more competitive U.S. market.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Mitsubishi Motors Corp. said Greg O'Neill, president and chief operating officer of its North American sales unit, resigned for unspecified reasons. O'Neill, who joined the fourth-largest Japanese automaker in 1998, is to leave Mitsubishi Motors North America on Dec. 31, the company said. Tokyo-based Mitsubishi has seen its U.S. sales drop 22% this year through October, the largest such drop among major brands. It's struggling to revamp its Cypress-based U.S.
NEWS
January 24, 2001 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As auto makers arm themselves for a fierce battle to simply maintain market share in a year of tumbling sales, Hyundai Motor Co. of South Korea has been handed the equivalent of a small nuclear weapon for its arsenal: Consumer Reports magazine has rated Hyundai's compact Elantra sedan as one of the best small cars in the United States. The rating underscores how once-reviled South Korean auto makers are overcoming American buyers' concerns about product quality. U.S.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hyundai Motor America Inc., the South Korean auto importer that has been struggling with weak sales and management turnover, on Tuesday named Finbarr O'Neill as its president and chief executive. O'Neill, 46, had been serving as the Fountain Valley company's interim chief operating officer since Robert Parker abruptly resigned in February. A lawyer and former Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. executive, O'Neill has been Hyundai Motor America's general counsel since the company was formed in 1985.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2004 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Americans are serious about their horsepower, and that could cost Hyundai Motor Corp. more than $85 million. The South Korean automaker has proposed paying about that much, plus attorney fees, to settle a class-action lawsuit accusing it of overstating the horsepower on cars exported to the U.S. The plaintiffs are about 840,000 Hyundai and Kia owners who purchased 1996 to 2002 model year vehicles with engine power overstated by as much as 10%.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hyundai Motor America, enjoying its best sales in a decade, plans to bring a near-luxury sedan to the U.S. by the end of next year, company President Finbarr O'Neill has confirmed. The long-discussed move would give the Fountain Valley-based importer an important "move-up" vehicle beyond its current lineup of small and mid-size cars while helping its parent, Seoul-based Hyundai Motor Corp., regain sales volume that it has lost because of South Korea's economic woes.
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