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Fine Mess

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1987
Wouldn't you know that as soon as the America's Cup sailboat races came out of the yacht club closet and went beer-bar populist, on television and all, things would turn into a pretty mess? Everything was fine until those Kiwis went and read the fine print in the cup's original "deed of gift." When San Diego's Dennis Conner won the cup back from the Aussies early this year, the San Diego Yacht Club automatically became the host of the 1991 races.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
June 12, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
The 1990 Italian film "Everybody's Fine" is one of the most depressing films I've ever seen. Starring the late Marcello Mastroianni, it's the story of an old man who tells his wife he's going to visit their grown kids. According to their letters the kids are doing great, but he'd like to see for himself. It turns out that the kids are all doing badly, and the whole trip is drenched in nostalgia and regret for what might have been. When the father gets home, he can't bring himself to tell his wife the truth, even though - the audience discovers - she's been dead and buried for years.
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OPINION
June 12, 2012 | Jonah Goldberg
The 1990 Italian film "Everybody's Fine" is one of the most depressing films I've ever seen. Starring the late Marcello Mastroianni, it's the story of an old man who tells his wife he's going to visit their grown kids. According to their letters the kids are doing great, but he'd like to see for himself. It turns out that the kids are all doing badly, and the whole trip is drenched in nostalgia and regret for what might have been. When the father gets home, he can't bring himself to tell his wife the truth, even though - the audience discovers - she's been dead and buried for years.
SPORTS
May 1, 2011 | T.J. Simers
I stayed home Saturday with the 16-month-old twins. Just me and them. And they both decided to do their business — looking at me as if I was going to do anything about it. As I watched them just lie there while waiting for their parents to come home, I thought about Frank McCourt and what he must feel like sitting there in the fine mess he's has made for himself. He's got one edge on the twins, though, learning how to talk in the last few days. He's not saying much yet, mostly gibberish like "That isn't who I am" in regards to the $100-million spending spree he and his wife went on before he started flying Southwest.
OPINION
March 21, 2006 | JOEL STEIN
WHEN THE Federal Communications Commission fined CBS $3.6 million -- by far the agency's biggest penalty ever -- for an episode of "Without A Trace" that featured a teen sex orgy, I immediately became interested in seeing the show. I had to see $3.6 million worth of offensiveness. Janet Jackson's Super Bowl nipple, after all, only rated $550,000 of obscenity. This was 6 1/2 nipples' worth of raunch. I got CBS to send over a DVD of the episode from Dec. 31, 2004, and immediately put it on.
SPORTS
November 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
The NFL fined Jacksonville defensive end Tony Brackens $15,000 Friday for a hit that knocked Dallas quarterback Troy Aikman out of Sunday's game. There was no helmet-to-helmet contact and no flag was thrown on the play, but the NFL told Brackens he was fined for violating a rule that bans picking up a player and slamming them to the turf, then falling on top of them with all their weight. Aikman, who has been hurting with a sore back, will not start Sunday against Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 9, 1987 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
--Jon Crews had few excuses when he was ticketed for having expired license tags on his car. Crews operates the office that issues them. Waterloo, Iowa, police stopped him for having an overdue vehicle registration as well as for driving without corrective lenses as required on his driver's license. Crews, as Black Hawk County treasurer, operates the motor vehicle office responsible for issuing yearly vehicle registrations. The two tickets amount to $66 in fines, court costs and surcharges.
SPORTS
December 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
Minnesota Viking receiver Randy Moss received another fine from the NFL on Friday--this time a $10,000 penalty for taunting during Sunday's 27-24 loss at Detroit. Moss caught a pass near the Lion sideline and "aggressively confronted the opposing bench," according to an NFL spokesman. The league has fined Moss $30,000 for four infractions this season--three times for taunting and once for wearing an unofficial hat on the sidelines during the exhibition season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2007 | Dana Parsons
Don't you hate those people who try to sneak that 11th item through the grocery checkout counter? Or the guy who hops into the carpool lane with his pet mannequin? Wouldn't you just love to sock it to 'em? Come now the Wilsons of Riverside County -- Willie and Cynthia -- described by their attorney as "working-class folks like you and me." With one key difference, I would suggest.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1986 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Everyone has an off day and, unfortunately, "A Fine Mess" (citywide) is one of Blake Edwards'. It's not really a bad movie. In some ways, it's a better directed farce than the current hits "Back to School" or "Legal Eagles." But it's erratic, and often weightless or uncentered; the pieces keep flying apart. This extended slapstick chasemovie--about a horse-doping scandal, two hapless Hollywood hangers-on and the two bumbling torpedoes pursuing them--doesn't have the flair of Edwards at his best.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2011
The steep flight of stairs featured in the Oscar-winning 1932 comedy short, "The Music Box" are cherished among fans of the legendary team of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. There's even a plaque on the steps in Silver Lake commemorating the production. Directed by James Parrott, "The Music Box" ? the first film to win the Oscar for live action short ? follows the misadventures of Laurel and Hardy as they try to deliver a player piano to a residence located up a daunting number of stairs.
SPORTS
September 20, 2009 | GRAHAME L. JONES
We open today with the tale of a fat man, two diamond earrings and a long-running feud. The principal character in this story is well known and goes by the name of Diego Armando Maradona . He was once a player of some note, but is rapidly proving yet again that a great player does not necessarily make a great coach. His girth may increase but not his reputation. When last seen on a soccer field, Maradona, now in charge of Argentina's floundering national team, was in Asuncion, Paraguay, trying to explain away a 1-0 World Cup qualifying loss to Paraguay that left Argentina in danger of not making it to the big shindig in South Africa in 2010.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2009
Re: "Another rating drop for the state," July 15: California will be paying more to borrow money. Guess who gets to pay the bill? And who do we thank for this mess? Allen F. Van Schaick San Marino
SPORTS
October 19, 2008 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Charles Wang, the Shanghai-born owner of the New York Islanders, has hired announcers to call games in Mandarin. But they're apparently having trouble translating certain words and phrases into the Chinese language. Thus, the Bruins have become the Brown Bears and the Panthers are Black Leopards. Writes ESPN the Magazine: "At least the Far East will get a clear intro to the NHL's best, Sid the Kid," quoting announcer Justin Chang as explaining, "Everyone knows what a Penguin is. " -- Trivia time Who was the oldest jockey to win a Breeders' Cup race, and how old was he?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2007 | Dana Parsons
Don't you hate those people who try to sneak that 11th item through the grocery checkout counter? Or the guy who hops into the carpool lane with his pet mannequin? Wouldn't you just love to sock it to 'em? Come now the Wilsons of Riverside County -- Willie and Cynthia -- described by their attorney as "working-class folks like you and me." With one key difference, I would suggest.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2006 | Jan Breslauer, Special to The Times
For a man who writes about polities where you pay to pee and pigs run amok, Greg Kotis seems like a pretty regular guy. Seated in the darkened house of an off-Broadway theater during tech rehearsals for his new play, "Pig Farm," he calmly taps away on a laptop, making notes to fine-tune the finale. Onstage, red police lights swirl and sirens scream. Husband Tom tries to hold his household together, while knife-wielding wife Tina takes cover on the landing, dodging bullets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1989 | ALLISON SAMUELS, Times Writer
Mark Hild enjoys nothing better than spending his day working in his townhouse garage-turned-art studio in Irvine. Cluttered with filing cabinets, a photographic darkroom and portraits of jazz great Duke Ellington, the room is where the 71-year-old semi-retired graphic illustrator has continued to practice his craft for additional income.
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