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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1992 | JOHN HENKEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Murders, incest, suicides, seductions and revenge, all driving a blood feud. Sounds like a miniseries, right? Well, it is also the stuff of myth, in particular the Finnish legend of Kullervo, which gets an unusual double exposure at the Music Center this month. This weekend, the Los Angeles Philharmonic presents Sibelius' symphonic poem "Kullervo," 100 years after its premiere established the composer's career. Then on Feb.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2003 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Grigory Yefimovich Rasputin, a Siberian peasant who masked debauchery in the robes of spiritual devotion and whose influence on the court of Czar Nicholas II helped lead to the Russian Revolution, was an operatic figure if ever there was one. He was said to possess hypnotic eyes, and he seduced women in St. Petersburg society with the pickup line that you can't be saved if you haven't sinned.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1992 | JOHN HENKEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine this, if you can: A U.S. opera company commissions an American composer to write an opera on, say, the French and Indian War. Then, with heavy government support and fanfare, the company records the new piece before it has ever been heard publicly, packs up principals, chorus, sets and costumes and goes to Finland for the premiere, coinciding with the release of the recording.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1992 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Strange things are happening at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion this week. Unprecedented things. Weird and vaguely wondrous things. Exotically Nordic things. The Music Center Opera is staging its first world premiere. Well, staging may be the wrong word. Try hosting . The centerpiece for this cumbersome, undeniably festive and obviously costly venture has nothing to do with Los Angeles. It isn't even American. It comes--lock, stock and chorus--from Helsinki. Helsinki?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2003 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Grigory Yefimovich Rasputin, a Siberian peasant who masked debauchery in the robes of spiritual devotion and whose influence on the court of Czar Nicholas II helped lead to the Russian Revolution, was an operatic figure if ever there was one. He was said to possess hypnotic eyes, and he seduced women in St. Petersburg society with the pickup line that you can't be saved if you haven't sinned.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1992 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Strange things are happening at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion this week. Unprecedented things. Weird and vaguely wondrous things. Exotically Nordic things. The Music Center Opera is staging its first world premiere. Well, staging may be the wrong word. Try hosting . The centerpiece for this cumbersome, undeniably festive and obviously costly venture has nothing to do with Los Angeles. It isn't even American. It comes--lock, stock and chorus--from Helsinki. Helsinki?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1992 | PETER HEMMINGS, Hemmings is general director of the Los Angeles Music Center Opera. and
I am glad that music critic Martin Bernheimer liked so much of the Finnish National Opera's and our production of "Kullervo." But I am puzzled and frustrated by the insinuations contained in his review ("A Finnish Invasion at the Music Center," Calendar, Feb. 27). For some reason, he implied that there is something unsavory about the fact that the Finnish co-production premiered here, which could not be further from the truth.
NEWS
July 25, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Martti Talvela, the 6-foot-7, 300-pound basso whose rich voice and pliant tones brought him acclamation in the capitals of the world, most often in the role of "Boris Godunov," has died of a heart attack, Finnish newspapers reported Monday. He was 54.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
"Yevgeny Onegin" as staged these days at the Metropolitan Opera isn't exactly a triumph of modern musical theater. The semi-whimsical sets of Rolf Gerard looked quaintly tacky when they were new, and that was in 1957. The costumes of Ray Diffen resemble afterthoughts, which they are. Under the dubious circumstances, one can hardly blame the latest stage director on duty, Bodo Igesz, for concentrating on safe and familiar traffic maneuvers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1992 | JOHN HENKEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine this, if you can: A U.S. opera company commissions an American composer to write an opera on, say, the French and Indian War. Then, with heavy government support and fanfare, the company records the new piece before it has ever been heard publicly, packs up principals, chorus, sets and costumes and goes to Finland for the premiere, coinciding with the release of the recording.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1992 | JOHN HENKEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Murders, incest, suicides, seductions and revenge, all driving a blood feud. Sounds like a miniseries, right? Well, it is also the stuff of myth, in particular the Finnish legend of Kullervo, which gets an unusual double exposure at the Music Center this month. This weekend, the Los Angeles Philharmonic presents Sibelius' symphonic poem "Kullervo," 100 years after its premiere established the composer's career. Then on Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2008 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Patrick Flynn, the music director of the Riverside County Philharmonic for 19 years who also guest-conducted ballet, opera and classical orchestras around the world, has died. He was 72. Flynn died Sept. 10 of a pulmonary embolism at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said Jacqueline Porter, a former wife who remained a close friend. He had been a resident of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1991 | JOHN HENKEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A world premiere and three new productions highlight Music Center Opera's sixth season, as announced by the company Tuesday. Unlike previous seasons, the eight operas will be spread relatively evenly over a September to June period. "It gives the illusion of permanence," company general director Peter Hemmings joked at the press conference. "It keeps the audience involved in what we are doing throughout the year, and it is much better for the company."
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