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Firefighters Suits

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1994 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attorney for two firefighters named as arson suspects in the devastating Calabasas-Malibu fire last fall said Wednesday that he will bring legal action against Los Angeles County for damage to their reputations. Larry Feldman, who represented the 13-year-old boy who won a multimillion-dollar out-of-court settlement in a molestation claim against pop-music superstar Michael Jackson, said he expects to file a claim against the county within the next two weeks, a step required before a lawsuit.
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NATIONAL
May 25, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court reinstated a discrimination ruling Monday in favor of 6,000 black applicants for Chicago firefighting jobs in the 1990s, saying they had properly sued after it was clear that an entry-level test had a "disparate impact" based on race. The ruling leaves public employers in a pickle if they are required by law to use tests for deciding who should be hired or promoted. After two Supreme Court decisions with very different results in the last year, public employers can be sued for using tests that screen out most blacks and other minorities; they also can be sued by high-scoring white applicants if the test scores go unused.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1997
Two Latino employees of the Los Angeles Fire Department sued the agency Tuesday for $5 million, alleging racial discrimination, assault, harassment and retaliation from department personnel. Donald Smith, an 18-year veteran, is a fire inspector with the brush-clearing unit. He and Dora Avendano, a clerk typist, say they have been subjected to three years of "blatant discrimination." Smith, 39, of Pasadena, is regional director of the California Hispanic Firefighters Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2007 | Steve Hymon and David Zahniser, Times Staff Writers
Legal consultants warned the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday that taxpayers risk being hit with a judgment of $7 million or more if the city loses a discrimination lawsuit brought by a black firefighter who was fed a firehouse spaghetti dinner secretly laced with dog food. With the start of trial in the case now less than two weeks away, the council spent two hours debating a last-minute settlement offer behind closed doors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1996
Huntington Beach firefighters have filed suit against the city, claiming they are being unfairly deprived of the ability to increase their pensions through a so-called "rollover" benefit. The Huntington Beach Firefighters Assn. contends the city has changed the rules midstream governing how its members can convert benefits into pay, said Fire Captain William Ogden, the association's president. He said firefighters negotiated over the years for the conversion benefit in lieu of pay raises.
NEWS
September 27, 1995 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury on Tuesday ordered Westminster to pay nearly $2 million to five firefighters who, the panel found, were unjustly disciplined or fired by top city officials. That figure could soar as early as today when the same jury will listen to more evidence before deciding whether to also award punitive damages and if so, how much. The firefighters' attorney, Alan C. Davis of San Francisco, said the jury rendered "a very fair verdict." City Atty. Richard D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2003 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
A Fullerton fire captain has filed a lawsuit against the city claiming he was groped, harassed and subjected to offensive sexual innuendoes by his boss at work. Capt. John R. Stokes, who has been with the department nearly 20 years, alleged in the lawsuit that Battalion Chief Eric Newman grabbed Stokes' crotch, rubbed the inside of his leg with a radio antenna and made offensive sexual remarks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Los Angeles City Council voted 9 to 1 Friday to retain outside lawyers to help defend the city in a lawsuit brought by Tennie Pierce, a firefighter whose firehouse meal in 2004 was laced with dog food. Pierce has alleged that the act was racially motivated. The contract with the firm Jones Day is worth as much as $750,000. The case is scheduled to go to trial in March. Councilman Bernard C. Parks dissented, saying the city has spent enough on the case. He has pushed for a settlement.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Eight firefighters who were arrested in a protest last year over ground zero recovery efforts have sued the city and the New York Police Department. The federal lawsuit stems from an angry confrontation on Nov. 2, 2001, between firefighters and police officers. The firefighters were upset that the number of firefighters working to recover victims was being reduced.
NATIONAL
May 25, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court reinstated a discrimination ruling Monday in favor of 6,000 black applicants for Chicago firefighting jobs in the 1990s, saying they had properly sued after it was clear that an entry-level test had a "disparate impact" based on race. The ruling leaves public employers in a pickle if they are required by law to use tests for deciding who should be hired or promoted. After two Supreme Court decisions with very different results in the last year, public employers can be sued for using tests that screen out most blacks and other minorities; they also can be sued by high-scoring white applicants if the test scores go unused.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Los Angeles City Council voted 9 to 1 Friday to retain outside lawyers to help defend the city in a lawsuit brought by Tennie Pierce, a firefighter whose firehouse meal in 2004 was laced with dog food. Pierce has alleged that the act was racially motivated. The contract with the firm Jones Day is worth as much as $750,000. The case is scheduled to go to trial in March. Councilman Bernard C. Parks dissented, saying the city has spent enough on the case. He has pushed for a settlement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2003 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
A Fullerton fire captain has filed a lawsuit against the city claiming he was groped, harassed and subjected to offensive sexual innuendoes by his boss at work. Capt. John R. Stokes, who has been with the department nearly 20 years, alleged in the lawsuit that Battalion Chief Eric Newman grabbed Stokes' crotch, rubbed the inside of his leg with a radio antenna and made offensive sexual remarks.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Eight firefighters who were arrested in a protest last year over ground zero recovery efforts have sued the city and the New York Police Department. The federal lawsuit stems from an angry confrontation on Nov. 2, 2001, between firefighters and police officers. The firefighters were upset that the number of firefighters working to recover victims was being reduced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1997
Two Latino employees of the Los Angeles Fire Department sued the agency Tuesday for $5 million, alleging racial discrimination, assault, harassment and retaliation from department personnel. Donald Smith, an 18-year veteran, is a fire inspector with the brush-clearing unit. He and Dora Avendano, a clerk typist, say they have been subjected to three years of "blatant discrimination." Smith, 39, of Pasadena, is regional director of the California Hispanic Firefighters Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1996
Huntington Beach firefighters have filed suit against the city, claiming they are being unfairly deprived of the ability to increase their pensions through a so-called "rollover" benefit. The Huntington Beach Firefighters Assn. contends the city has changed the rules midstream governing how its members can convert benefits into pay, said Fire Captain William Ogden, the association's president. He said firefighters negotiated over the years for the conversion benefit in lieu of pay raises.
NEWS
September 27, 1995 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury on Tuesday ordered Westminster to pay nearly $2 million to five firefighters who, the panel found, were unjustly disciplined or fired by top city officials. That figure could soar as early as today when the same jury will listen to more evidence before deciding whether to also award punitive damages and if so, how much. The firefighters' attorney, Alan C. Davis of San Francisco, said the jury rendered "a very fair verdict." City Atty. Richard D.
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | STEPHANIE O'NEILL, Times Staff Writer
A former Glendale firefighter has agreed to drop a $10-million religious discrimination lawsuit against the city of Glendale in exchange for the city's promise to seal his personnel records. Under a tentative agreement expected to be presented to the City Council next week, former Glendale firefighter Michael Pomeranz, 34, will receive no money from the city and will not return to city employment, attorneys for both sides said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2007 | Steve Hymon and David Zahniser, Times Staff Writers
Legal consultants warned the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday that taxpayers risk being hit with a judgment of $7 million or more if the city loses a discrimination lawsuit brought by a black firefighter who was fed a firehouse spaghetti dinner secretly laced with dog food. With the start of trial in the case now less than two weeks away, the council spent two hours debating a last-minute settlement offer behind closed doors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1994 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attorney for two firefighters named as arson suspects in the devastating Calabasas-Malibu fire last fall said Wednesday that he will bring legal action against Los Angeles County for damage to their reputations. Larry Feldman, who represented the 13-year-old boy who won a multimillion-dollar out-of-court settlement in a molestation claim against pop-music superstar Michael Jackson, said he expects to file a claim against the county within the next two weeks, a step required before a lawsuit.
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | STEPHANIE O'NEILL, Times Staff Writer
A former Glendale firefighter has agreed to drop a $10-million religious discrimination lawsuit against the city of Glendale in exchange for the city's promise to seal his personnel records. Under a tentative agreement expected to be presented to the City Council next week, former Glendale firefighter Michael Pomeranz, 34, will receive no money from the city and will not return to city employment, attorneys for both sides said.
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