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Fires Austria

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NEWS
November 28, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flames reaching four stories high swept through frescoed chambers of the Hofburg Palace early Friday and smoke from the roaring blaze forced evacuation of the famed white Lipizzaner horses from the Spanish Riding School. The fire was thought to be the worst in the history of the central Vienna landmark dating back to the 13th Century. Initial estimates put the damage as high as $90 million.
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NEWS
December 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Lifts on Kitzsteinhorn glacier reopened to skiers Thursday, nearly one month after a deadly fire in a cable car tunnel killed 155 people. The gondola lift began carrying skiers from the village of Kaprun to the glacier at 8 a.m., the Austria Press Agency reported. The lift service was stopped after a fire broke out Nov.
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NEWS
June 1, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Salvage teams retrieved four more bodies from an Alpine tunnel in Austria, where a devastating weekend fire left five people dead and 49 injured, Salzburg Gov. Franz Schausberger said. According to the Austria Press Agency, Schausberger said more victims may be found in the Tauern tunnel in Salzburg province. The blaze began after a truck loaded with paint crashed into a car in the tunnel. The car exploded, setting off a fiery chain reaction.
NEWS
November 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Leaking lubricant, set ablaze by flames or intense heat, caused the cable-car fire that killed 155 people in an Alpine tunnel, a newsmagazine reported Saturday. But investigators, who the day before had suggested that a study of lubricant found at the Austrian site had been inconclusive, called the report speculation. Germany's Focus magazine said it learned that more than 13 gallons of the flammable liquid had leaked from one of the two driver's compartments at each end of the funicular train.
NEWS
November 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Leaking lubricant, set ablaze by flames or intense heat, caused the cable-car fire that killed 155 people in an Alpine tunnel, a newsmagazine reported Saturday. But investigators, who the day before had suggested that a study of lubricant found at the Austrian site had been inconclusive, called the report speculation. Germany's Focus magazine said it learned that more than 13 gallons of the flammable liquid had leaked from one of the two driver's compartments at each end of the funicular train.
NEWS
November 12, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fire and smoke raced through a packed cable car carrying skiers through a 2-mile-long tunnel here Saturday, trapping and killing at least 170 passengers in an inferno so intense that nothing was left but the car's undercarriage and the incinerated remains of victims.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Lifts on Kitzsteinhorn glacier reopened to skiers Thursday, nearly one month after a deadly fire in a cable car tunnel killed 155 people. The gondola lift began carrying skiers from the village of Kaprun to the glacier at 8 a.m., the Austria Press Agency reported. The lift service was stopped after a fire broke out Nov.
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rescue workers braved toxic fumes and unstable wreckage Sunday to begin retrieving the charred remains of at least 155 skiers and snowboarders, including eight Americans, from the grisly tomb under Kitzsteinhorn mountain where they suffocated and burned to death a day earlier in the worst Alpine disaster in modern history.
NEWS
November 15, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A stout red candle flickers on Ursula Kipper's desk, a silent tribute from City Hall co-workers still unable to grasp that her own warmth and light will never again fill the empty third-floor office. Kipper, 12 city government colleagues and 19 of their friends and family died together in Saturday's cable car inferno in the Alpine resort of Kaprun during what was supposed to be the City Hall ski club's annual play-together-and-stay-together outing to enjoy the first weekend of the season.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forensic investigators delved Monday into the grisly task of matching dental records and DNA samples with the charred remains of at least 159 people killed in a horrific ski cable car fire inside a tunnel under Kitzsteinhorn mountain. As helicopters ferried the first 66 bodies to a morgue in nearby Salzburg, the U.S. Army acknowledged that eight Americans from military facilities in Germany had perished in the blaze.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
In an emotional closure to Austria's worst Alpine disaster, mourners on Friday placed red roses at the foot of a crucifix in this city's 17th century cathedral--one for each of the 155 victims of a cable car blaze. Salzburg's bishop compared the pain of those grieving with Christ's agony on the cross in a service overflowing with friends and relatives of victims, dignitaries from Austria and abroad, and rescue workers gathered to pay tribute to the skiers and snowboarders killed in the fire.
NEWS
November 15, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A stout red candle flickers on Ursula Kipper's desk, a silent tribute from City Hall co-workers still unable to grasp that her own warmth and light will never again fill the empty third-floor office. Kipper, 12 city government colleagues and 19 of their friends and family died together in Saturday's cable car inferno in the Alpine resort of Kaprun during what was supposed to be the City Hall ski club's annual play-together-and-stay-together outing to enjoy the first weekend of the season.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forensic investigators delved Monday into the grisly task of matching dental records and DNA samples with the charred remains of at least 159 people killed in a horrific ski cable car fire inside a tunnel under Kitzsteinhorn mountain. As helicopters ferried the first 66 bodies to a morgue in nearby Salzburg, the U.S. Army acknowledged that eight Americans from military facilities in Germany had perished in the blaze.
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rescue workers braved toxic fumes and unstable wreckage Sunday to begin retrieving the charred remains of at least 155 skiers and snowboarders, including eight Americans, from the grisly tomb under Kitzsteinhorn mountain where they suffocated and burned to death a day earlier in the worst Alpine disaster in modern history.
NEWS
November 12, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fire and smoke raced through a packed cable car carrying skiers through a 2-mile-long tunnel here Saturday, trapping and killing at least 170 passengers in an inferno so intense that nothing was left but the car's undercarriage and the incinerated remains of victims.
NEWS
June 1, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Salvage teams retrieved four more bodies from an Alpine tunnel in Austria, where a devastating weekend fire left five people dead and 49 injured, Salzburg Gov. Franz Schausberger said. According to the Austria Press Agency, Schausberger said more victims may be found in the Tauern tunnel in Salzburg province. The blaze began after a truck loaded with paint crashed into a car in the tunnel. The car exploded, setting off a fiery chain reaction.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
In an emotional closure to Austria's worst Alpine disaster, mourners on Friday placed red roses at the foot of a crucifix in this city's 17th century cathedral--one for each of the 155 victims of a cable car blaze. Salzburg's bishop compared the pain of those grieving with Christ's agony on the cross in a service overflowing with friends and relatives of victims, dignitaries from Austria and abroad, and rescue workers gathered to pay tribute to the skiers and snowboarders killed in the fire.
NEWS
November 28, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flames reaching four stories high swept through frescoed chambers of the Hofburg Palace early Friday and smoke from the roaring blaze forced evacuation of the famed white Lipizzaner horses from the Spanish Riding School. The fire was thought to be the worst in the history of the central Vienna landmark dating back to the 13th Century. Initial estimates put the damage as high as $90 million.
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