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Fires Safety

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NEWS
October 26, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With sentiment growing for restrictions or an outright ban on wood shingle roofs since the disastrous East Bay fire, the industry's trade group has dropped its decades-long opposition to a statewide fire safety standard. "The fire prompted the industry to take a hard look at making some sort of statement . . . to the public," Don Meucci, a spokesman for the Cedar Shake and Shingle Bureau, said Friday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 23, 2013 | By Lew Sichelman
Wildfires like the one this summer that killed 19 elite firefighters near Yarnell, Ariz., can't be stopped. But there's plenty homeowners can do to protect their properties. If you don't think you should take remedial action, think again. One-third of all houses are located in what fire safety officials call wild-land urban districts, which are near or among areas prone to wildfires. Worse, perhaps, wildfires have ravaged houses in three-fourths of the 50 states. And with more and more people choosing to live in rural areas closer to nature, the chances are greater than ever that someone you know - maybe even you - will lose a house to a fire.
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BUSINESS
January 21, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Federal safety regulators have given the Chevrolet Volt an all-clear. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Friday that it did not identify a safety defect, concluding that the car does not pose any unusual risk of fire. In closing the book on its investigation into Volts catching on fire, NHTSA also issued new guidelines for how emergency personnel and tow truck operators should deal with electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids that have been damaged in severe accidents.
NEWS
October 29, 1993 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, this city may have been trapped by its own geography and a stubborn insistence that its architecture not conform to the rest of Orange County. Hemmed in by a lush greenbelt and the sea, Laguna had an identity separate and distinct from the rest of Orange County. Homes perched awkwardly on stilts in the foothills, many affording an unparalleled view of the Pacific. The whole town had the feel of a village unto itself. Now that exclusivity has come at a price.
NEWS
October 25, 1996 | DUKE HELFAND and MATEA GOLD and ERIC MALNIC, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As homeowners swept up mounds of gray ash and hosed down hundreds of blackened windows from Round 1 of the 1996 Southern California fires, nervous officials Thursday began reviewing plans for a possible Round 2 this weekend, when wind gusts could reach as high as 100 mph around some canyons and mountain ridges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1990 | LEN HALL and TERRY SPENCER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anyone faced with a leftover Christmas tree and a cold night might be tempted to toss the browning tree into the fireplace. Don't do it, Orange County fire officials warn. "Christmas trees don't burn, they explode," said Assistant Fire Marshal Bob Honish of the Santa Ana Fire Department. "Because they are so dry, Christmas trees will burn completely in two or three seconds, producing large amounts of radiant heat," enough to ignite the room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1987
Two politically controversial approaches to fire safety will come before the Orange County Board of Supervisors on Wednesday during a public hearing to review proposed fire code changes. One would ban all fireworks, except those used by professionals in public displays, and the other would require fire sprinkler systems in new apartment buildings. Both measures should be adopted, not only in the county's unincorporated areas under board control but in all of the county's 26 cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1999 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT
State and county firefighters Thursday will demonstrate techniques to protect orchards and display a new four-wheel vehicle that sprays firefighting foam in Santa Paula. A small prescribed burn will be conducted about 9 a.m. at the Limoneira Ranch on Cummings Road to show orchard owners how to eliminate brush and other fuels from their land, county fire officials said.
NEWS
October 8, 1992
The Burn Institute of San Diego encourages individuals to regularly survey their homes for possible fire dangers. Here are some of the points they recommend you check: * Are matches and lighters out of children's reach? * Are there one or more smoke detectors placed properly throughout the house, especially by the bedrooms? Are they in good working order and tested monthly? * Are portable space heaters kept away from curtains, furniture and normal traffic patterns?
BUSINESS
November 12, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Federal safety officials have launched a probe into whether the batteries in Chevrolet's Volt plug-in hybrid sedan are prone to fires. The probe by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration was launched after a Volt caught fire following a crash test, General Motors Co. said. The agency will be looking at the safety of batteries from several makes of electric vehicles, according to the Associated Press. The Volt is designed to run off its batteries for about 40 miles.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2011 | By Julie Wernau
It's not a regulatory arm of the government, but try to find a gadget in your home that Underwriters Laboratories hasn't touched. Check under the computer mouse or the smoke alarm, beneath the light switch or on the TV cable, and the telltale "UL" stamp will be there. The marking means the device is unlikely to catch fire. And if you accidentally drive away from the gas station with the nozzle still in the tank, UL is the reason you don't haul away the entire pump and set the neighborhood ablaze.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2009 | Dan Weikel
As a wildfire headed toward Mountain View Estates mobile home park near Chatsworth several years ago, the emergency response of the park's manager and assistant manager was simple, Gary Gibson recalls: They left, leaving him and hundreds of other residents to fend for themselves. "They abandoned the park knowing the fire was bearing down on us," said Gibson, 62, who was later evacuated by sheriff's deputies. "It was a terrible thing to do, leaving the elderly and infirm behind to face that risk."
OPINION
October 22, 2008
Re "Fire rules don't cover power line," Oct. 17 Downed power lines are responsible for way too many fires, causing destruction of land and property and, ultimately, injury and death. With a little proactive maintenance, utilities and power-line operators can prevent most, if not all, risks posed by the power lines they operate. The assertion by Southern California Gas Co. and California Public Utilities Commission spokesperson Tom Hall that they are exempt from any fire hazard abatement rules simply does not hold up under close scrutiny.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2008 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
With highly flammable heavy timber and plastics, close quarters, constant construction and use of open flames and pyrotechnics, movie studios have long been considered especially vulnerable for the types of fires that swept across the Universal Studios lot. Back in 1952, when an eight-acre chunk of the Warner Bros. back lot erupted in flames, Burt Lancaster, Ray Bolger and other actors were pressed into service to help firefighters battle the blaze.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2008 | Michael Rothfeld, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Friday urged California property owners to follow his example and prepare for fire season by bringing in experts to examine their homes, saying he had just learned that his own family was "living in the middle of" a fire hazard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2008 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Federal officials Monday disclosed a variety of lapses at the San Onofre nuclear power plant near San Clemente, including a worker who falsified records for more than five years to show that operators made hourly fire patrols when they had not. As a result, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission ordered Southern California Edison to develop a training program for employees, including ethics courses for managers and contractors as well as classes for plant staff to prevent deliberate misconduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2007 | From the Associated Press
TAHOE CITY, Calif. -- Four months after Lake Tahoe's largest recorded wild-land fire, Tahoe City-area property owners have overwhelmingly voted to pay an annual assessment to improve fire safety on the north shore. A total of 3,873 voters approved the assessment while 1,589 rejected it. The mail-in election ended Wednesday, when ballots were counted.
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