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December 2, 2013 | David Lazarus
If you live in Southern California, you've gotten - or will get - a parking or speeding ticket. It's an immutable law of nature. And in tandem with this natural phenomenon, a cottage industry of legal professionals has taken root to assist people in navigating and, possibly, beating the system. Take, for example, a company called the Ticket Clinic, which has offices throughout the region and boasts that it "may be your best bet for getting your traffic ticket dismissed. " Among other services, the Ticket Clinic says, it can "keep additional points off of your driving record" and "prevent skyrocketing insurance rates resulting from a traffic ticket.
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BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Private space companies, such as SpaceX in Hawthorne, would get a local property tax break on launch vehicles, fuel, satellites and other gear under a bill approved overwhelmingly Thursday by the state Senate. The proposal, AB 777 by Assemblyman Al Muratsuchi (D-Torrance), would create the exemption from local property taxes for a 10-year period that would end Jan. 1, 2024. Legislation is needed to modernize the state's tax code to encourage companies such as billionaire Elon Musk's SpaceX to build their rockets and spacecraft in California, Muratsuchi said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2011
Companies founded by Todd DeStefano, the former events manager at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Commission, received payments of at least $10,000 in the years shown from: 2008 Tool of North America: Filmed commercials at the Coliseum or Sports Arena University of California: Hosted a UCLA pregame event in 2007 at the city-owned swim stadium, which neighbors the Coliseum "An American Carol": A film that shot scenes at...
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Irish pharmaceutical giant Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals said it will pay $5.6 billion in cash and stock for a fast-growing Anaheim bio-pharmaceutical firm that specializes in treating multiple sclerosis, the companies announced Monday. The deal for Questcor Pharmaceuticals Inc. would give Mallinckrodt drugs that primarily treat chronic autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Questcor's Acthar Gel, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, accounts for most of the company's sales.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Port truck drivers from three Carson-based firms went on strike Monday, alleging unfair labor practices by their employers, union organizers said. Truck drivers from Green Fleet Systems allege their employer has in recent months retaliated against them for their efforts in seeking to unionize, organizers said. This is their second strike in less than three months. In late August, truck drivers went on a 24-hour strike that ended with a rally with clergy before returning to work.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan
For U.S. military firms, the latest revelations of highly sophisticated hacker attacks on Google Inc. are highlighting a new reality, and a potentially lucrative business: The battlefield is shifting to cyberspace. Google's admission last week that it and other large companies were infiltrated by cyber-spies is bolstering prospects for major military contractors that in recent years have been intensifying their focus from developing weapons to defending computer systems and networks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
An Orange County pharmacist has won a $20,000 judgment against two companies he said stiffed him on pay for work he did on a state contract while the firms were co-owned by the husband of state Sen. Mimi Walters (R-Irvine). The state labor commissioner found that pharmacist Larry Drechsler of Orange County had not been paid more than $4,000 that was owed him for services provided to the companies, American Healthcare Recruiting and Drug Consultants Inc. The rest of the award was for interest and penalties.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2011
A federal rule adopted Monday places tighter restrictions on how U.S. trading firms can invest their customers' money. The action comes amid a federal investigation into whether MF Global illegally tapped its clients' accounts before filing for bankruptcy. The Commodity Futures Trading Commission voted Monday to finalize the rule. It prohibits firms from using money from customer accounts for certain investments, including purchases of foreign debt. It also limits how much of their money can be invested in others, such as money-market mutual funds.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Despite recent moves by Yahoo Inc. and Best Buy to end work-from-home arrangements, telecommuters need not fret. Most firms have no plans to end the flexible work policies, a survey found. A poll of 120 human resources executives by Challengers, Gray & Christmas Inc., a global outplacement and executive coaching firm, found that 97% of those who responded -- about 80% -- said they had no plans to eliminate telecommuting. "When major companies like Yahoo and Best Buy make notable policy changes, there is no doubt that other employers will take notice and some may even reevaluate their policies," said John A. Challenger, chief executive of the firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2012 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - State Sen. Mimi Walters, an Orange County Republican, landed at the center of an ethics investigation after she helped a firm owned by her husband collect cash from the state prison system. Now at least a dozen subcontractors - dentists and pharmacists hired by two of David Walters' companies to treat inmates - say the firms owe them more than $120,000 in back payments. The workers have filed complaints in court and with the state labor commissioner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The U.S. Justice Department on Thursday announced that Anadarko Petroleum Corp. had agreed to pay $5.15 billion to clean up hazardous substances dumped nationwide - including radioactive uranium waste across the Navajo Nation - in the largest settlement ever for environmental contamination. The operations of Kerr-McGee Corp. - which was acquired by Anadarko in 2006 - also left behind radioactive thorium in Chicago and West Chicago, Ill.; creosote waste in the Northeast, the Midwest and the South; and perchlorate waste in Nevada, according to U.S. Deputy Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | Jessica Garrison and Jill Cowan
A metal-finishing facility in Newport Beach poses an "unacceptably high" cancer risk to its neighbors and should curtail its emissions as soon as possible, state air quality officials said Tuesday. The South Coast Air Quality Management District said it would ask its independent hearing board to order Hixson Metal Finishing to reduce its emissions of chromium 6 "on an expedited schedule. " The plant is next to an apartment building in a neighborhood with a mix of homes and businesses near the border with Costa Mesa.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court sounded ready Monday to curtail the use of certain business patents in a case involving a patent for a computerized risk analysis of international financial transactions. Use of such business-method patents has soared in recent decades. Once granted, they can give a firm or a person a monopoly for up to 20 years to profit from the patented process. Critics say many of the recent computer-related patents are vague and stifle innovation by giving exclusive rights to commonly used methods or formulas.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2014 | By Tim Logan
This time last year, investment firms raced to buy dozens of single-family homes in neighborhoods from Fontana to South Los Angeles to lease them out, transforming the mom-and-pop rental business into a Wall Street juggernaut. The flood of cash helped spark a steep rise in prices, drawing criticism for pushing families out of the market. But now the firms themselves have all but stopped buying in Southern California, the latest evidence that home prices have hit a ceiling. The professional investors no longer see bargains here.
WORLD
March 25, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan, Ralph Vartabedian and Don Lee
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia - Calm seas returned Wednesday to aid the search for the missing Flight 370, but public protests and the first legal filing on behalf of a passenger hinted at a stormy forecast for Malaysia and its state-supported airline. Executives of Malaysia Airlines said Tuesday that they would pay at least $5,000 to each of the families of the 227 passengers aboard the Boeing 777 that disappeared March 8, but the gesture appeared to provide little comfort to distraught relatives, about 100 of whom marched to the Malaysian Embassy in Beijing, where some clashed with police.
OPINION
March 25, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will consider a proposition that will strike many Americans as bizarre: that large, for-profit businesses can refuse on religious grounds to comply with a federal mandate that they include contraception in their employee health plans. Three companies - Hobby Lobby, a chain of craft stores with 13,000 full-time employees; Mardel, a bookstore chain; and Conestoga Wood Specialties, a cabinet manufacturer - are challenging the mandate. The businesses say it would require them to cover forms of contraception that the owners regard as equivalent to abortion - and thus offensive to their religious faith.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2010 | By Walter Hamilton and Jack Dolan
The obscure intermediaries that were paid millions of dollars to win investment business from the California Public Employees' Retirement System ranged from Wall Street heavyweights to small independent firms. But all shared a common pursuit: grabbing a piece of lucrative consulting work in what has become a pension-fund bonanza. Documents released by CalPERS on Thursday show that a variety of firms with differing backgrounds and expertise were paid tens of millions over the last decade for acting as intermediaries between investment managers and the pension-fund giant.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - A Mexican regulatory agency has ordered the massive companies that dominate this nation's telephone and broadcast television sectors to share their network infrastructure with competitors, a move that could seriously alter Mexico's telecommunications landscape in the months and years to come. The rulings by the Federal Telecommunications Institute appeared to be a "step in the right direction" for the Mexican economy, said George W. Grayson, a Mexico specialist at the College of William and Mary.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu and E. Scott Reckard
Increasing activity by data hackers has produced millions of victims and one clear winner: the credit monitoring business. Services with names such as BillGuard and Identity Guard report a surge in sign-ups from people anxious to be protected. Nervous consumers worry that the parade of data breaches involving credit card, debit card and other personal information could leave them vulnerable to fraud and identity theft. The latest incident was revealed Saturday when the California Department of Motor Vehicles said it was "alerted by law enforcement authorities to a potential security issue within its credit card processing services.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
In 1958, Ed Michelson started a motion picture catering company - Michelson Food Services - and made food for the cast and crew on such classic films as "West Side Story" and "Some Like it Hot. " Michelson was one of the first to operate a food service truck on film sets, and for decades business boomed, back when virtually all the big studio movies were filmed in Los Angeles. Today, son Steve Michelson said that's no longer the case. When his father died, Michelson decided to start his own catering company, Sylmar-based Limelight Catering, which employs about 50 people and has been in business for 14 years.
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