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First Jersey Securities Inc

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June 12, 1987
Georgia Secretary of State Max Cleland said the consent order signed by Atlanta branch manager Matthew Wochele and New York-based First Jersey Securities Inc. placed the company under probation for two years in Georgia. The firm will also pay $97,500 in penalties. The firm previously specialized in trading securities of small companies not traded through the NASDAQ. The consent order ended an 18-month investigation into alleged securities violations.
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BUSINESS
June 21, 1995 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Tuesday ordered financier Robert E. Brennan to pay $71.5 million to settle charges that he defrauded thousands of investors as head of First Jersey Securities Inc. Judge Richard Owen delivered his review of Brennan's business activities in a stinging 48-page ruling that brings to an end a civil trial on charges brought by the Securities and Exchange Commission.
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BUSINESS
June 21, 1995 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Tuesday ordered financier Robert E. Brennan to pay $71.5 million to settle charges that he defrauded thousands of investors as head of First Jersey Securities Inc. Judge Richard Owen delivered his review of Brennan's business activities in a stinging 48-page ruling that brings to an end a civil trial on charges brought by the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
June 12, 1987
Georgia Secretary of State Max Cleland said the consent order signed by Atlanta branch manager Matthew Wochele and New York-based First Jersey Securities Inc. placed the company under probation for two years in Georgia. The firm will also pay $97,500 in penalties. The firm previously specialized in trading securities of small companies not traded through the NASDAQ. The consent order ended an 18-month investigation into alleged securities violations.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2001
Former penny stock promoter Robert E. Brennan was sentenced to nine years and two months in prison Thursday for bankruptcy fraud and obstructing justice. Brennan, 57, became widely known in the 1980s through television commercials for his former flagship brokerage, First Jersey Securities Inc., in which he stepped off a helicopter and urged viewers to "come grow with us." . . . McDonald's Co.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2001 | Associated Press
Former penny-stock tycoon Robert E. Brennan was convicted of bankruptcy fraud after a monthlong trial in Trenton, N.J., and could face six to 10 years in federal prison. Brennan, 57, was convicted on seven of 13 counts. A hearing is set for today to determine whether he will remain free on bail pending sentencing.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1986 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Robert Brennan, a controversial entrepreneur who built First Jersey Securities Inc. into a nationwide stock brokerage firm, is resigning as chairman to pursue other interests that could include politics, he said in an interview published Wednesday by the Newark (N.J.) Star-Ledger. Brennan, seen in television commercials flying in his helicopter to promote First Jersey Securities, will also step down as chief executive of the firm that he founded 12 years ago.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2000 | Associated Press
Disgraced financier Robert E. Brennan, who, before regulators labeled him a cheat, appeared in TV commercials urging investors to buy penny stocks, was arrested and charged with bankruptcy fraud. Two indictments were unsealed with Brennan's arrest, both related to his cashing of $500,000 in casino chips five years ago. These are the first criminal charges Brennan has faced. He was arrested at his Colts Neck, N.J., home.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1985 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday filed a new lawsuit against Robert E. Brennan and First Jersey Securities Inc., charging that the flamboyant stockbroker and his firm defrauded customers by improperly influencing their purchases and sales of low-priced stocks. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court here, alleges that Brennan and his New York-based firm earned gross profits of at least $9.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Day-trading firm Heartland Securities Corp. and six brokers agreed Tuesday to pay $70.2 million to settle regulatory charges that they made tens of millions of dollars in illegal profits by exploiting a Nasdaq Stock Market trading system for individual investors. Sheldon Maschler, Erik Maschler, Jeffrey Citron and Michael McCarty made thousands of illegal proprietary trades on Nasdaq's Small Order Execution System from 1993 to 2001, the Securities and Exchange Commission said.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1987 | From Reuters
Once high-flying broker Rooney, Pace Inc. agreed Monday to leave the securities industry after an investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission found numerous violations in three of its public stock offerings. The firm was a major player in the business of IPOs, or initial public offerings, a segment of the brokerage industry that also included First Jersey Securities Inc., which earlier reached a settlement with the SEC over fraud charges dating back to 1984.
SPORTS
February 11, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Pine Tree Lane, a 3-year-old filly who had never raced, was entered in the sixth race at Aqueduct on Jan. 23. Running against other 3-year-old maidens, Pine Tree Lane was listed at 10 to 1 in the morning line by one of the handicappers in the Daily Racing Form. Other than her modest bloodlines, there was no information on her in the Form--no races and in this case not even a workout. In New York, betting stops before the last few horses are loaded into the gate.
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