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Fiscal Discipline

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1992
Your July 9 editorial criticizing the Taxpayers Protection Act initiative (Proposition 165) on the November ballot is very wide of the mark. You attack the initiative as giving the governor "usual emergency powers," yet precisely the opposite is true: Virtually every other state gives its governor authority to close up unplanned budget deficit. California is almost alone in hamstringing its own chief executive in dealing with a fiscal crisis, and the unfortunate results are plain to see. The Office of Planning and Research recently carried out an exhaustive survey of the 50 states.
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NATIONAL
August 4, 2004 | Michael Finnegan and James Rainey, Times Staff Writers
With the country facing a record $445-billion federal deficit, Democratic presidential nominee John F. Kerry and running mate John Edwards stepped up efforts Tuesday to cast themselves as more fiscally responsible than President Bush. In separate campaign stops -- Kerry in Wisconsin, Edwards in Louisiana -- the senators embraced the traditionally Republican theme of fiscal discipline that President Clinton succeeded in co-opting for Democrats in the 1990s.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when President Bush is urging members of Congress to curb their appetite for big spending on hometown projects, a surprising figure is bellying up to the bar: Rep. Tom DeLay (R-Texas), one of the House's staunchest fiscal conservatives. DeLay, who as House Majority Whip also is one of Congress' premier power brokers, managed to add to a budget bill $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2001 | ADAM SCHIFF, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) represents Burbank, Glendale and Pasadena
The last eight years have brought enormous prosperity to this country. We have had some of the lowest unemployment in decades, the highest rate of home ownership, the longest period of uninterrupted growth--the list of superlatives goes on and on. The benefits of this economy did not reach everyone, but they nearly did.
WORLD
December 10, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
By agreeing to knit their nations closer together on fiscal and economic policy, Europe's leaders are writing a potentially momentous new chapter in the continent's drive toward political integration. But at the end of a two-day summit in Brussels on Friday, it was unclear whether the enforced austerity demanded by France and Germany would help revive Europe's weakest economies, or condemn them to a cycle of deepening recession. And the chorus of oui , ja and si at the summit was punctuated by a resounding "no" from Britain, laying bare the widening rift between one of the region's biggest players and its neighbors on the European mainland.
OPINION
November 19, 2011
California's budget is almost never adopted by the legal deadline, but it was this year — in part because of a new simple-majority-vote requirement that left quarrelsome Republicans out of the discussion, and in part because daydreaming Democrats relied on a vaporous wish that the economy was going to improve and that the state would recoup $3.7 billion more in tax revenues than now seems likely. The shortfall is expected to trigger $2 billion in spending cuts, and Californians who think that's a good thing — that the cuts will impose needed fiscal discipline, or will force the state to make more responsible decisions, or will punish lazy freeloaders or greedy state workers — should wake up and smell the future.
WORLD
February 12, 2010 | By Henry Chu
European leaders lent their moral support but no hard cash to the Greek government Thursday in its struggle to tackle a debt crisis that has called the stability of the euro into question. Financial markets responded with little enthusiasm to the expression of solidarity, pushing the euro down to one of its lowest rates against the dollar -- about $1.36 -- since last spring. The currency had staged a small rally this week on the strength of investor belief that the 27-nation European Union would unveil a rescue package for Athens at an economic summit Thursday in Brussels.
NATIONAL
August 30, 2008 | JAMES RAINEY
John McCain, you sly dog, you did it. You kept political reporters and cable television chatterers in the dark for weeks. Most awoke Friday morning still weary from the Democratic National Convention, only to be sent scrambling when you picked Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin as your running mate. You gave the media what it always claims it wants: Surprises. Original thinking. News. What a mistake. In trying to reclaim your maverick brand, you appear to have pushed an unknown, unformed and under-vetted politician onto the world's biggest political stage.
HEALTH
April 10, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Reporting from Washington -- Former President George W. Bush doesn't miss being in office, and he wishes the “Bush tax cuts” of the early 2000s didn't carry his name - at least that's according to a series of quips made by Bush during a rare public appearance on Tuesday. Bush, who has stayed out of the spotlight in his post-presidential years, was addressing the Tax Policies for Growth conference, an event dedicated to discussing a Bush Institute project to promote policies aimed at achieving sustainable annual growth of 4%. That goal is the topic of a new book published by the institute.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
“Two years ago they were writing our obituary. Well, it didn't happen. California is back.” That's our governor talking. And he's right. Gov. Jerry Brown delivered his 11th State of the State address Thursday, and as usual, it was as eclectic as its speaker. As The Times reported , Brown “cited Irish poet William Butler Yeats on education, French writer Montaigne on laws, and the biblical story of Joseph and the Pharaoh on financial discipline.” He even defended his bullet-train project -- a too-expensive, too-complicated boondoggle if ever there was one -- by quoting from the children's classic “The Little Engine That Could”:  “I think I can, I think I can. And over the mountain the little engine went.
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