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May 9, 1990 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you walk into your neighborhood fish market or grocery store, the display case is filled with "fresh" swordfish, "fresh" salmon, "fresh" shrimp, "fresh" petrale sole. But then you take your catch home and find that your "fresh" filet has a frozen center. Or your fork finds mush instead of firm flesh. How long has your dinner been away from the ocean? And what has happened to it since it left the waves behind?
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FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By Jonathan Gold, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
It has never been easier to eat high-end sushi than it is now in Los Angeles - to surrender two hours and half a month's rent to the choreographed roll of the waves. You can experience the masculine crispness of Mori or the postmodern wackiness of Wa; the gentle experimentation of Kiriko or the discofied modernism of Nobu Malibu; the gold leaf and truffle oil of Go's Mart or the intellectual approach of Kiyokawa. The idea of purist edomae sushi, or at least its rigor, is well-established here.
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FOOD
August 11, 2012
Halibut is notoriously difficult to grill due to its low fat content. The brining process helps solve that problem, but there are a few more tricks as well. First, don't overcook it. Halibut is best when cooked to a low internal temperature. It will readily flake at only 118 degrees, the equivalent of a rare steak. Also, before grilling, brush a super-fine veil of homemade, or if you must, store-bought mayonnaise on both sides of the fish. This will help keep it from sticking to the grill.
SCIENCE
March 13, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Think of a robot. Chances are you imagined one with legs like C-3PO of "Star Wars" fame or something with wheels like NASA's Mars rover Curiosity . Neither of these rigid body types are particularly flexible and certainly can't move through water well. But what about a robot with a tail? Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have designed a soft robot based on a fish, which can bend its body and quickly flee the way that real fish do to escape predators. Typical robots are rigid with exposed mechanisms and unnatural movement, but the fish described in the first issue of the new journal Soft Robotics is covered in a soft silicone skin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
A 37-year-old pacu fish and icon to tiki fans  has found a home after nearly a year of living in a closed Rosemead restaurant.  The property's current owners decided Monday they would keep Rufus and build him a new aquarium in the Chinese restaurant they plan to open. Charles Ye, a spokesman for the owners, said they decided to keep Rufus to help decorate the restaurant. They also feared moving him would be harmful to his health.  "He's 37 years old already," Ye said.
FOOD
February 22, 2014 | By Russ Parsons
There is an ocean full of canned sardines at local markets, but which ones are really worth buying? Tasting through more than a dozen samples, the range of quality was astonishing. There were sardines that were as bland as beige, and then there were fish that were absolutely magnificent. To help make sense of the journey, I enlisted Lou Amdur, owner of Lou Provisions & Wine and a sardine lover from way back. We sampled sardines from a variety of sources: regular supermarkets, high-end markets, Asian markets and specialty markets such as the Harbor City Spanish store La Española Meats.
FOOD
April 14, 2012
If you've got company, it's always a nice touch to break through the salt crust tableside. It's like doing a magic trick. But return the fish to the kitchen to fillet it, since this is a messy process. • Using two spatulas, gently lift the fish out of its salt bed and onto a clean work surface (it will be tender and want to fall apart easily). Scrape off any salt clinging to the fish with the blade of your slicing knife. It's important to be as thorough as possible with this.
NEWS
January 6, 2004 | J. Michael Kennedy
Another seafood entree has become too popular for a species to sustain. Overfishing is threatening the orange roughy, plus other imported fish in demand in the U.S., according to a recently released scientific study. The study, prepared by the World Wildlife Fund and Traffic, the wildlife trade-monitoring network, said rapidly expanding and unregulated fishing in deep waters could make orange roughy commercially extinct if protective measures are not taken immediately by international governing bodies.
SCIENCE
February 14, 2013 | By Amina Khan
A common psychiatric drug may be affecting the feeding behavior of wild fish as it filters out of our bodies, through our toilets and into treated wastewater that is released into natural water sources, according to a new study in the journal Science. The findings, which examined the effect of trace levels of the anti-anxiety medication oxazepam on wild European perch, have implications for the survival rates of fish and the way in which human pharmaceuticals may affect the delicate food web in aquatic ecosystems.
FOOD
April 14, 2010
Baked fish with mint (samcocho) Total time: 50 minutes Servings: 4 4 whole sea bass or Tai snapper (each about 3/4 pound), gutted and scaled Salt Fresh mint leaves 1 tablespoon olive oil Wrinkly potatoes Green cilantro sauce Red chile sauce 1. Heat oven to 400 degrees. Sprinkle the fish with salt and set aside 15 minutes. Tuck a few mint leaves into the cavity of each fish. Place the fish in a baking pan and drizzle with the oil. 2. Bake the fish until it flakes easily, about 20 minutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison
The two California Department of Fish and Wildlife scientists charged with doing environmental work on the proposed Newhall Ranch development had a daunting task. They were to help review whether and how the largest residential development ever approved in Los Angeles County - 20,000 homes stretching across a bucolic valley - could be built without undue harm to the environment, protected species and Southern California's last major wild river, the Santa Clara. The project was controversial and dizzyingly complicated.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By David Ng
"Big Fish," the elaborate stage musical based on the 2003 Tim Burton movie, flopped on Broadway last year, running for fewer than four months before closing at the Neil Simon Theatre in New York.  But this fish isn't dead in the water just yet. The musical -- featuring the original Broadway sets and costumes -- is coming to Southern California in a run scheduled for Oct. 31 to Nov. 16. Musical Theatre West will produce "Big Fish" at the Carpenter...
FOOD
February 22, 2014 | By Russ Parsons
There is an ocean full of canned sardines at local markets, but which ones are really worth buying? Tasting through more than a dozen samples, the range of quality was astonishing. There were sardines that were as bland as beige, and then there were fish that were absolutely magnificent. To help make sense of the journey, I enlisted Lou Amdur, owner of Lou Provisions & Wine and a sardine lover from way back. We sampled sardines from a variety of sources: regular supermarkets, high-end markets, Asian markets and specialty markets such as the Harbor City Spanish store La Española Meats.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2014 | By Maria L. LaGanga
SEATTLE - U.S. officials are heading to Greenland for a three-day meeting to persuade other Arctic nations to place a moratorium on high-seas fishing in the Arctic Ocean, where climate change is melting the permanent ice cap and allowing trawlers in for the first time in human history. The United States is proposing an agreement “that would close the international waters of the Arctic Ocean to commercial fishing until there is a good scientific foundation on which to base management of any potential fishing,” said David Benton, a member of the U.S. Arctic Research Commission, who will be part of the negotiations in Nuuk, Greenland.
SCIENCE
February 20, 2014 | By Amina Khan
By taking sewing thread and fishing wire and giving it a twist, scientists have created artificial muscle that's 100 times stronger than human or animal sinew. The invention, described in the journal Science, could be useful for prosthetic limbs, humanoid robots, implanted medical devices and even wearable clothing. This wouldn't be the first artificial muscle on the market: there are carbon nanotube yarns and metal wires, but they're often expensive or store relatively low amounts of energy compared to their competitors, scientists said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Frank Shyong
A 37-year-old pacu fish and icon to tiki fans  has found a home after nearly a year of living in a closed Rosemead restaurant.  The property's current owners decided Monday they would keep Rufus and build him a new aquarium in the Chinese restaurant they plan to open. Charles Ye, a spokesman for the owners, said they decided to keep Rufus to help decorate the restaurant. They also feared moving him would be harmful to his health.  "He's 37 years old already," Ye said.
FOOD
October 7, 2010
Ginger- and lemongrass-cured sable fish Total time: 15 minutes, plus curing time Servings: 8 to 12 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons coarse sea salt 1/2 cup sugar 1 tablespoon grated ginger 1 stalk lemongrass, dry outer leaves removed, inner stalk crushed (to release the oils) and coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons pink peppercorns, crushed 1 (11/4 - to 11/2 -pound) sable fillet, skin on and any pinbones removed About 3 tablespoons sake 1. In a medium bowl, combine the salt, sugar, ginger, lemongrass and peppercorns.
SCIENCE
February 13, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Scientists have cracked a cellular biology mystery underlying a harmful effect oil spills have on fish: irregular heartbeats that can lead to cardiac arrest. In studying the effects of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill on bluefin tuna spawning in the Gulf of Mexico, the research team discovered that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, block “signaling pathways” that allow potassium and calcium ions to flow in and out of cardiac cell membranes and sustain normal heart rates.
TRAVEL
February 7, 2014 | By John Horn
MOUNTAIN PINE RIDGE FOREST RESERVE, Belize - As Hummingbird Highway carves away from Belize's resort-laden sands, pavement dissolves into rutted dirt tracks and the dense jungle canopy starts to press in from all sides. The tallest buildings pushing through the foliage are Maya ruins, and howler monkeys and macaws lurk in the ceiba trees. Late at night, distant thunderstorms ring the horizon, broad sheets of lightning illuminating the mountains. Before I brought my family to Belize for 10 days last summer, I packed a copy of "Heart of Darkness," knowing that although traveling through Central America wouldn't precisely parallel a trip up the Congo River, Joseph Conrad's novel would remind me that the book was the indirect inspiration for our itinerary.
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