Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFish And Wildlife Service Us
IN THE NEWS

Fish And Wildlife Service Us

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
They won't be asking about ethnicity or household income, but biologists have begun their annual spring sea otter census. Sea otters are a keystone species, mammals at the top of the food chain and an indicator of the health of the marine ecosystem that is their habitat. This year's count began Monday at Pescadero Point. Four field biologists armed with Leica binoculars and Questar scopes spotted nine otters, one fewer than last spring. The census is a joint project of the U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1999
Regarding your Nov. 14 editorial concerning the use of conservation easements as a method to preserve and protect open space: The Transportation Corridor Agencies has preserved, restored or created approximately 2,037 acres of habitat and open space to compensate for construction of the Foothill, San Joaquin Hills and Eastern transportation corridors. In some cases the TCA owns this property outright. In most cases the underlying fee title is held by another entity, but the TCA holds a perpetual conservation easement that protects habitats and wildlife.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1989
Thank you for the excellent editorial "Ravens Vs. Tortoises" (Jan. 23) on the raven-control project initiated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, and the California Department of Fish and Game. As the editorial indicates, the service believes that the numbers of ravens using portions of desert tortoise habitat need to be reduced so that young tortoises have an opportunity to reach adulthood.
NEWS
January 11, 1992 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In what biologists hailed as "a wonderful success story," the once-endangered American peregrine falcon that was decimated by DDT in the 1960s has made such a dramatic comeback that a 17-year-old captive breeding project is being ended. The birds, famous for their use in falconry and identified by their distinctive gray or black "helmet," were down to two known mating pairs in 1975.
REAL ESTATE
August 28, 1988 | RAY KOVITZ, Kovitz is a Mission Viejo free-lance writer. and
When does a "white elephant" turn into a "swan"? When it is the Chet Holifield Federal Building in Laguna Niguel. The giant structure is more commonly known as the "Ziggurat" because of its distinctive terraced design resembling an ancient Babylonian or Assyrian temple. Less than five years ago, the Ziggurat was such a drag on the General Services Administration's budget that the agency sought a buyer. Although the building was appraised at $77 million in 1987, the top offer was $22 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1996 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several environmental groups sued the federal government this week, challenging a policy that is key to environmental compromises with developers such as a landmark plan launched this year in Orange County. Environmentalists claim that the Clinton administration's 1994 "no surprises" policy, intended to defuse developers' criticisms of the Endangered Species Act, in fact dangerously weakens federal protection of rare plants and animals nationwide. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2002 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California State Lands Commission quickly and unanimously approved a $100-million plan to restore the Bolsa Chica wetlands Wednesday, even as a judge allowed a landowner's lawsuit to go forward on a development proposed for the bluffs above the marsh. The decisions Wednesday provided the latest twists in the three-decade-long tale of Bolsa Chica, once a flourishing coastal marsh that was cut off from the ocean a century ago by duck hunters and later contaminated by oil fields.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1985 | TOM GREELEY, Times Staff Writer
The last 300 pairs of least Bell's vireos are wintering in Mexico. But when the songbirds return home next spring, they are expected to be the newest members of the Department of the Interior's endangered species list, which could throw a major crimp into plans for water projects, roads, bridges, and residential and commercial developments throughout San Diego County. On Friday, the San Diego Assn.
NEWS
February 25, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The gathering is hopelessly unwieldy, sometimes raucous and always fractious, but for nearly two decades, it has held at bay the potential extinction of globally treasured wildlife.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | STEPHEN BRAUN and GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The rugged landscape of the American West brings out both the enraptured naturalist and the partisan ideologue in Gale A. Norton. In June 1991, soon after she took office as Colorado's attorney general, Norton hiked into the snowy upper reaches of Rocky Mountain National Park. Walking with aide Trish Bangert, Norton rhapsodized that the scene was "like a spiritual experience for her."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|