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HEALTH
February 8, 2010
Results haven't been unanimous, but a good deal of research suggests that healthy doses of potassium can help lower your blood pressure. A 2001 study based on data from more than 17,000 U.S. adults, for example, found that people who ate 8.5 servings a day of fruits and vegetables (about 4,100 milligrams of potassium) had lower blood pressures than people who ate 3.5 servings (1,700 milligrams) -- by an average of 7.2 mm Hg systolic and 2.8 mm Hg diastolic units. (One contributing factor in the success of the DASH diet may be potassium-rich fresh fruits and vegetables.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
An omega-3 fatty acid plentiful in fish oil boosts the ability of healthy young adults, whose brains are already at their peak levels of speed and performance, to hold several items in memory for a short time, a study has found. The study is the first to suggest that fish oil might enhance cognitive performance in healthy people by boosting their working memory. The latest research adds to evidence of fish oil's beneficial neuropsychiatric effects: Supplementation with the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)
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HEALTH
March 15, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Q: Which is better, fish oil or flax oil capsules? Both contain omega-3 fatty acids, but it is much harder for the body to utilize the fats from flaxseed oil. If your goal is to lower cholesterol and triglycerides, fish oil is preferable. During a recent stay in the hospital, while swallowing pills I mentioned to the nurse that I had a dread of having a large pill get stuck in my throat. She explained that the right way to swallow is to lower your chin down toward your chest.
SCIENCE
September 11, 2012 | By Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
Is there something fishy going on with omega-3 fatty acids? For years, major health and medical organizations have recommended fish oil supplements rich in omega-3s to reduce the threat of heart disease. In Europe, where support is particularly enthusiastic, a doctor's failure to recommend the supplements is viewed by some as bordering on malpractice. But several recent studies have raised questions about the benefits of fish oil, sparking no small amount of confusion. A report published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
In a Consumer Reports test of fish oil supplements, most passed muster but some didn't measure up on quality. Lab test results on 15 top brands analyzed for amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, disintegration, spoilage and contaminants. Researchers found that at least one sample from six brands didn't meet all the standards set. The results were released Tuesday and are available on newsstands. Over-the-counter fish oil supplements are extremely popular and used to treat heart disease, high blood pressure and psoriasis and a number of other ailments.
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Omega-3 fatty acids don't help people with preexisting heart disease avoid future cardiovascular trouble, a new study has found.  What does this mean for fish oils and our health?   That's not clear. Here's what the study, reported in the Archives of Internal Medicine, did: Dr. Sang Mi Kwak and a team of S.  Korean scientists looked at studies of people with existing heart disease who took EPA or DHA, the kinds of omega-3s found in fatty fish. (Another omega-3, ALA, is found in plant oils and slowly converts in the body to these other kinds.)
HEALTH
May 5, 2008 | By Chris Woolston, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The products: All over the world -- Japan, the Arctic, Anaheim, wherever -- people who eat a lot of fish seem to enjoy unusual protection from heart disease. Not everyone can manage a plate of salmon or sashimi every night, but there's another option: fish oil capsules, the fatty extracts of anchovies, sardines or salmon poured into a package of gelatin. Fish oil is loaded with two omega-3 fatty acids, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid ( EPA). Studies in humans and animals suggest that these nutrients can help prevent blood clots, lower blood pressure and encourage healthy heart rhythms.
SCIENCE
October 20, 2010 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Claims touting a component of fish oil as a mood enhancer and a spur to infant brain development may be a bit fishy, a new study suggests. DHA, an increasingly common ingredient in prenatal vitamins and baby formula and taken as a supplement by pregnant women, failed to prevent postpartum depression or to enhance babies' cognitive development or language acquisition, a large study has shown. The finding, reported Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., casts new doubt on a dietary supplement whose promise as brain food has been aggressively marketed despite inconsistent results.
NEWS
November 15, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
If you have been taking fish oil supplements in an effort to smooth out erratic heart beats caused by atrial fibrillation, you can save your money, researchers said Monday. The largest study of the supplements ever conducted showed that a prescription form of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids called Lovaza is worthless for treating atrial fibrillation, providing no benefit whatsoever. "This is data that we've needed sorely," Dr. Christine Albert of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, who was not involved in the study, said at a news conference.
NEWS
February 2, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Americans seem to be falling for fish oil supplements -- and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. A new survey suggests fish oil pills are the most popular dietary supplement in the country, even over multivitamins. Fish oil matters because it is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, specifically DHA and EPA. If you've been paying attention (and the ConsumerLab.com survey indicates that you have), you know fish oil can help maintain a healthy heart and better brain function for starters.
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Omega-3 fatty acids don't help people with preexisting heart disease avoid future cardiovascular trouble, a new study has found.  What does this mean for fish oils and our health?   That's not clear. Here's what the study, reported in the Archives of Internal Medicine, did: Dr. Sang Mi Kwak and a team of S.  Korean scientists looked at studies of people with existing heart disease who took EPA or DHA, the kinds of omega-3s found in fatty fish. (Another omega-3, ALA, is found in plant oils and slowly converts in the body to these other kinds.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
The catch of small, schooling fish such as sardines and anchovies should be cut in half globally and the amount left in the ocean doubled to protect the ecologically vital species from collapse, scientists say in a new report. The silvery species known as forage fish are harvested in huge numbers worldwide and are easy for fishermen to round up because they form dense schools, or "bait balls. " But wide fluctuations in their numbers make them especially vulnerable to overfishing, according to the report released Sunday by the Lenfest Forage Fish Task Force, a 13-member panel of scientists from around the world.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
In a Consumer Reports test of fish oil supplements, most passed muster but some didn't measure up on quality. Lab test results on 15 top brands analyzed for amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, disintegration, spoilage and contaminants. Researchers found that at least one sample from six brands didn't meet all the standards set. The results were released Tuesday and are available on newsstands. Over-the-counter fish oil supplements are extremely popular and used to treat heart disease, high blood pressure and psoriasis and a number of other ailments.
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Pregnant women are often urged to eat foods high in omega-3 fatty acids (usually simply referred to as “fish”) for healthier and smarter babies, but now research suggests that the “brain food” may also help women ward off postpartum depression. Or, rather, depression symptoms. Maybe. In a 52-person study, pregnant women who took a fish oil capsule five days a week during their third trimester had fewer symptoms of postpartum depression—such as anxiety—than women who took a placebo of corn oil during their third trimester, researchers at the University of Connecticut have announced.
NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Eat fish. And don’t stress -- overly much -- about the potential effect of its mercury level on your risk of cardiovascular disease. That ultimately might be the lesson from a new study assessing the effect of mercury exposure via fish consumption. Researchers examined toenail clippings of 3,427 men and women with cardiovascular disease, comparing them with the clippings of 3,427 people without cardiovascular disease. They then measured the amount of mercury and selenium concentrations in the toenail samples of those who had heart disease.
NEWS
February 23, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Red yeast rice supplements, fish oil, folic acid, B vitamins. Supplements believed to be healthy for the heart might not be -- and could even be harmful. Those are the latest findings from a recent Consumer Reports guide that recommends seeing a doctor before taking any heart supplements. First off, the report "Heart supplements: Proceed with caution" advises selecting supplements that carry the "USP verified" label. That means the nonprofit U.S. Pharmacopeia vouches for the "quality, purity, and potency of dietary supplement finished products, dietary supplement ingredients, and pharmaceutical ingredients.
NEWS
August 27, 2010
Fish oil has long been touted as one of nature's heart-helping natural compounds, but is it worth popping that jellied pill as part of your nutrition regime?  Might depend on who you are. A Dutch study found that people who had already suffered heart attacks did not significantly reduce their risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure and other cardiovascular events by eating about 400 mg of fish fatty acids per day. But the supplement did help those patients who had diabetes in addition to a past heart attack.
NEWS
November 23, 1986 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Fish oil fed to rhesus monkeys blocks hardening of the arteries induced by high-fat foods, researchers reported at a American Heart Assn. meeting. In a finding that may have major implications for the human diet, University of Chicago scientists said their study is the first to demonstrate that fish oil directly reduces cholesterol buildup in primates, adding to a growing body of evidence that suggests a diet rich in fish can help prevent heart disease.
NEWS
February 11, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
A healthy intake of omega-3 fatty acids, found in fish and fish oil supplements, has been shown to protect against retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness, particularly among people with diabetes. Now researchers have clarified how fish oil helps. Previously, researchers from Children's Hospital Boston showed that mice fed a diet rich in omega-3s had less abnormal blood-vessel growth in the retina and less of an inflammatory response compared with mice fed omega-6 fatty acids, a less beneficial fatty acid.
NEWS
February 2, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Americans seem to be falling for fish oil supplements -- and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. A new survey suggests fish oil pills are the most popular dietary supplement in the country, even over multivitamins. Fish oil matters because it is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, specifically DHA and EPA. If you've been paying attention (and the ConsumerLab.com survey indicates that you have), you know fish oil can help maintain a healthy heart and better brain function for starters.
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