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MAGAZINE
March 14, 1993
Regarding Charles Perry's review of Andreas ("No-Miss Swiss," Feb. 7): Pistou does not mean fish but rather a basil sauce. It's the French version of the Italian pesto. Shame on you, Mr. Perry, though I will continue reading your reviews. W. A. WALLMAN Newport Beach
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SCIENCE
November 9, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Coral under attack from toxic seaweed can actually call for help, recruiting fishy bodyguards to fend off an attacker within minutes, a pair of scientists has found. When poison-producing algae make contact with coral, the coral can send out a chemical signal that alerts goby fish to come and eat away at the weed, according to a paper released Thursday by the journal Science. The platoon of gobies provides a last line of defense against toxic seaweed. The seaweed emits harmful chemicals that damage the coral, which it competes with for resources.
OPINION
July 8, 2005
Re "Planting a Seed of Self-Sufficiency," July 5: It's been said that if you give a man a fish, you'll feed him for a day; if you teach a man how to fish, you'll feed him for a lifetime. I hope the Group of 8, in its discussions of how billions will be spent in Africa, will also choose to support those who can teach the people to become self-sufficient. Wendy D. Henderson Chatsworth
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2008 | Eric Bailey
A power company has agreed to alter operations at a hydroelectric dam at the mouth of the Klamath River to help endangered fish. Two species of suckerfish have been at the center of a drawn-out water war that pitted environmentalists against farmers in the Klamath Basin, a fertile agricultural region straddling the Oregon-California border. Portland-based PacifiCorp reached a settlement with the environmental group Oregon Wild to shut down power production in the late summer and early fall at the Link River Dam at times when the endangered fish begin congregating nearby in Upper Klamath Lake.
NATIONAL
April 6, 2013 | By Kim Murphy
SEATTLE - Since a tsunami struck Japan more than two years ago, a variety of debris has washed up on U.S. beaches -   including large boat docks and a soccer ball, found in Washington state's Olympic National Park, from the Otsuchi Soccer Club. That all got trumped recently with the discovery of six live fish, stowed away in a water-filled bait box aboard a 20-foot Japanese boat that washed up on the Long Beach Peninsula in southwestern Washington. Researchers had already seen live crabs, sea stars and algae clinging to parts of the estimated 1.5 million tons of debris unleashed by the March 2011 tsunami, but they had never encountered live fish that drifted on their own from Asia, said John Chapman, who specializes in aquatic biological invasions at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2012 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
On behalf of the animal rights group PETA, an Irvine woman is asking the city to erect a memorial at the street corner where 1,600 pounds of fish died this month when a container truck crashed into two other vehicles. Dina Kourda, a volunteer with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, wrote to the Irvine Public Works Department to request that a sign be placed at Walnut and Yale avenues to honor the lives of the fish - believed to be saltwater bass - lost in the accident. The fish had been stored in large tanks that cracked open as a result of the Oct. 11 accident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Southern California researchers have found evidence of ingestion of plastic among small fish in the northern Pacific Ocean in a study that they say shows the troubling effect floating litter is having on marine life in the far reaches of the world's oceans. About 35% of the fish collected on a 2008 research expedition off the West Coast had plastic in their stomachs, according to a study to be presented Friday by Algalita Marine Research Foundation and the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project.
NEWS
April 17, 1999 | Associated Press
Nikita, the Caspian Sea sturgeon that was a symbol of good relations between Norway and the Soviet Union, died at the Bergen Aquarium after a worker mistakenly put salt water in its tank. The long and elegant Nikita was 38 years old, but could have lived happily for more than a century. A gift from former Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev, it arrived in 1964, the only one of four that survived the trip, the Oslo newspaper Dagsavisen reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Game wardens on Friday arrested nine people for allegedly poaching sturgeon and chinook salmon from the Sacramento River and the delta. Wardens made the arrests after raiding seven homes in Sacramento. They said the suspects illegally netted young, fall-run chinook salmon to use as bait for sturgeons. The sturgeons' eggs were sold illegally as caviar on the black market. The populations of salmon and sturgeon have dropped in the last few years.
NEWS
November 16, 2011 | By Rick Pearson, Chicago Tribune
Saying "a fish rots at the head," the chairman of the Republican National Committee on Wednesday urged President Obama's defeat next year for failing to deliver on promises to fix the economy. Reince Priebus, the RNC leader, made the comments after a speech at the University of Chicago, where Obama was a law school lecturer. Appearing at the university's Harris School of Public Policy, Priebus contended that after running an inspirational 2008 campaign based on "hope and change," Obama has been forced to seek reelection "on fear and division" because White House policies aimed at improving the economy and creating jobs have failed.
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