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Fisher Scientific Group Inc

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BUSINESS
June 9, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
In a transaction with a potential value of $125 million, Henley Group said Thursday that it plans to buy back the 20% of Fisher Scientific Group stock that it does not own. Most of that 20% was distributed as a stock dividend to Henley shareholders in April, 1987. Henley also said Fisher Chairman Richard Cramer is resigning from his other job as chief executive but will stay on as chairman. In an interview, Cramer said he plans to devote more time to community activities and to starting up biomedical companies in the San Diego area.
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BUSINESS
June 9, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
In a transaction with a potential value of $125 million, Henley Group said Thursday that it plans to buy back the 20% of Fisher Scientific Group stock that it does not own. Most of that 20% was distributed as a stock dividend to Henley shareholders in April, 1987. Henley also said Fisher Chairman Richard Cramer is resigning from his other job as chief executive but will stay on as chairman. In an interview, Cramer said he plans to devote more time to community activities and to starting up biomedical companies in the San Diego area.
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BUSINESS
March 27, 1987 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
For most companies, multimillion-dollar losses cause concern, even consternation on the part of management. Not at La Jolla-based Henley Group Inc., which Thursday reported a $354-million fourth-quarter loss and a $426-million net loss for the full year ended Dec. 31. "Henley's doing just fine and just as expected," Chairman Michael Dingman said in a statement Thursday afternoon. Henley's losses came on fourth-quarter revenues of $825 million and full-year revenues of $3.2 billion.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
San Diego's only two companies on this year's Times 100--lubricant manufacturer WD-40 in the 12th spot and discount warehouse operator Price Co. in at 39th--have proven themselves durable leaders in the world of retailing. Detractors have been saying for years that WD-40's familiar blue cans of lubricant and Price's chain of membership-only shopping depots were concepts too simple to withstand the inevitable onslaught of competition. Yet both companies remain prosperous, growing and two of the state's top-performing companies in terms of return on equity over a two-year period.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1989
Alphabetical list of all companies, their rankings on Times 100, Sales 100, Market Value 100 and Growth 100 lists, and counties in which they are headquartered. Times 100 Mkt. Sales Company County rank val. Sales grth. ADAC Laboratories Santa Clara 73 AIFS Inc. San Francisco 10 AST Research Inc. Orange 24 Aaron Spelling Productions Los Angeles 7 Acuson Corp. Santa Clara 20 71 17 Adia Services Inc. San Mateo 100 39 Adobe Systems Inc. Santa Clara 3 95 Advanced Micro Devices Santa Clara 68 67 67 H.F. Ahmanson & Co. Los Angeles 33 27 Alza Corp.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1989
20th Century Industries PROPERTY-CASUALTY INSURANCE 6301 Owensmouth Ave. Woodland Hills 91367 818-704-3700 Chief Executive: Louis Foster Exchange: NASDAQ Employees: 1,514 Hiring trend: Increasing 3COM Corp. COMPUTER PERIPHERAL EQUIPMENT 3165 Kifer Road Santa Clara 95052 408-562-6400 Chief Executive: L. William Krause Exchange: NASDAQ Employees: 1,348 Hiring trend: Increasing Aaron Spelling Prod . MOTION PICTURE PRODUCTION 1041 N. Formosa Ave. Los Angeles 90046 213-850-2413 Chief Executive: Aaron Spelling Exchange: AMEX Employees: 1,257 Hiring trend: Increasing Acuson Corp.
NEWS
June 7, 1987 | Compilation and analysis for the 1987 roster were provided by Maureen Perry and Cynthia Sosin of the Los Angeles Times marketing research department.
KEY TO ROSTER--The corporate name of each company is followed by its founding or incorporation date in parentheses. Sales figures have been confined as closely as possible to operating revenues. They include equity in earnings of joint venture corporations as reported, but exclude nonoperating revenue such as dividends and gains from the sale of real estate. Income figures are given before extraordinary items.
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