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NEWS
March 29, 1995 | DOUG CONNER
The depletion of fish in the North Atlantic has reached such proportions that Canadian patrols have intercepted a Spanish trawler off Newfoundland, and Massachusetts Gov. William F. Weld has asked that coastal regions of his state be declared a disaster area. The NationalMarine Fisheries Service reports that 40% of U.S. stocks are commercially depleted or becoming so, and another 43% are being taken at the maximum sustainable rate. TOTAL U. S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Officials announced Tuesday that they are temporarily waiving an endangered species protection to enable water managers to send more Northern California water south. The move comes as fishery agencies are under increasing political pressure to take advantage of late winter storms and ramp up pumping from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the center of the state's water distribution system. Mark Cowin, director of the state Department of Water Resources, said the rule suspension would remain in effect for the next week or two and would increase delta exports by as much as 10,000 acre-feet a day. An acre-foot is equivalent to a year's water supply for two households.
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NEWS
June 11, 1989
The latest casualty of the March 24 Exxon Valdez oil spill is the major salmon fishery in Kamishak Bay at the southern end of Cook Inlet. Although ocean-borne oil from the spill had bypassed the bay, oil that washed ashore on nearby beaches has been pushed off the sand by recent storms and into the bay's fishing waters. The closure comes because of Alaska's zero-tolerance policy, meaning that the state will not tolerate any oil in the fishery to risk contaminating the catch or tainting the image of pristine Alaska seafood.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - The Environmental Protection Agency took the first step Friday toward possibly halting construction of the largest open-pit mine in North America, declaring that Alaska's Bristol Bay - home to the most productive sockeye salmon fishery on Earth - must be protected. "Extensive scientific study has given us ample reason to believe that the Pebble Mine would likely have significant and irreversible negative impacts on the Bristol Bay watershed and its abundant salmon fisheries," EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy told reporters Friday morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
The sardine fishing boat Eileen motored slowly through moonlit waters from San Pedro to Santa Catalina Island, its weary-eyed captain growing more desperate as the night wore on. After 12 hours and $1,000 worth of fuel, Corbin Hanson and his crew returned to port without a single fish. "Tonight's pretty reflective of how things have been going," Hanson said. "Not very well. " To blame is the biggest sardine crash in generations, which has made schools of the small, silvery fish a rarity on the West Coast.
FOOD
May 10, 2013 | By David Karp
Fishermen selling their own catch at Southern California farmers markets are vanishing. An attractive alternative is Community Seafood, a "community-supported fishery" that started selling last Sunday at the Santa Monica Main Street farmers market . Founded by two marine scientists, Sarah Rathbone and Kim Selkoe, it seeks to support local fisheries and provide ultra-fresh, sustainably caught fish to subscribers. Rathbone, the owner, is the fiancée of Charlie Graham, who formerly sold crabs and spiny lobsters at the Santa Monica market.
TRAVEL
July 29, 2001
I am an attorney for the Indian community of the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon. What the lead article on the Columbia River Gorge/Hood River failed to note ("Tales From the Hood," July 1) is that all those sporting events disrupt a major Indian treaty fishery. The article also fails to mention that the region is, as it has been for thousands of years, the center of Native culture for what is now an area of eight states. For the past 80 years the area has been the site of governmental attacks against Indian populations and their fishery.
SPORTS
April 19, 1989 | PETE THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Huge trout no longer have a huge following here, unless you count the people who gaze at the thousands of pictures on the walls of the Willow Beach Marina. It's impossible not to notice the five-pounders, the 10-pounders, or even the 21.3-pound rainbow trout mounted in a glass case on the wall behind the bar. "Were all these fish caught here?" a first-time visitor, seemingly amazed at the display of photographed trout, asks a sales clerk. She nods, smiling to others who know as she does that this weekend fisherman is building his hopes on history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1995
A plan for water policy and management of the Santa Clara River is caught among four or five lollygagging agencies that only have one interest in mind: procrastinate and pass the buck because that assures them of jobs at our expense. The approach of the rainy season reminds us that we need a concrete, long-term solution that will benefit all landowners and not exclude wildlife and waterfowl. Environmentalists and fishery experts have had more to say than agriculture or urban business interests that are dependent on the maximum yield from the properties they own and on which they are taxed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999
I am writing this to defend my name against the commonly used word "'overfishing." "Overfishing" insinuates commercial fishermen are to blame for 20 million people who think this is a pretty neat place to live. I am not sure if the general public is aware of this, but overfishing is a relative term. For example, if you have only two fish remaining in the ocean and their offspring have a snowball's chance in hell of survival because of gross mismanagement of a fishery, pollution, loss of habitat and global warming, then a fisherman catching one of these might be guilty of over-harvesting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The National Marine Fisheries Service violated federal law when it authorized the Navy's use of sonar in training exercises off Hawaii and California through 2018, an environmental group said in a lawsuit filed Monday. The agency's own analysis had determined the war games would result in 155 marine mammal deaths, more than 2,000 permanent injuries and about 9.6 million instances of temporary hearing loss and disruptions of vital behaviors - an 1,100% increase over the previous five-year period, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
The sardine fishing boat Eileen motored slowly through moonlit waters from San Pedro to Santa Catalina Island, its weary-eyed captain growing more desperate as the night wore on. After 12 hours and $1,000 worth of fuel, Corbin Hanson and his crew returned to port without a single fish. "Tonight's pretty reflective of how things have been going," Hanson said. "Not very well. " To blame is the biggest sardine crash in generations, which has made schools of the small, silvery fish a rarity on the West Coast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Commercial fishermen have filed a lawsuit in federal court challenging the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for abandoning a program to create an "otter-free zone" in Southern California coastal waters that sustain shellfish industries. The lawsuit, filed this week by the Pacific Legal Foundation on behalf of harvesters of sea urchin, abalone and lobster south of Point Conception, accuses the agency of illegally terminating the program without congressional approval or authorization.
OPINION
May 24, 2013 | By Robert Redford
Coursing through vast reaches of Alaskan tundra, glacial lakes and emerald forests, six major river systems converge along the rim of the Bering Sea to form the crystalline waters of Bristol Bay, the richest wild salmon grounds in the world. Yet if three global mining giants get their way, this region - one of the last truly wild places in our country - could be destroyed. Each year, up to 40 million sockeye salmon make the journey from deep ocean waters into Bristol Bay and, from there, upstream to spawn in the inland shallows of their birth.
FOOD
May 10, 2013 | By David Karp
Fishermen selling their own catch at Southern California farmers markets are vanishing. An attractive alternative is Community Seafood, a "community-supported fishery" that started selling last Sunday at the Santa Monica Main Street farmers market . Founded by two marine scientists, Sarah Rathbone and Kim Selkoe, it seeks to support local fisheries and provide ultra-fresh, sustainably caught fish to subscribers. Rathbone, the owner, is the fiancée of Charlie Graham, who formerly sold crabs and spiny lobsters at the Santa Monica market.
SCIENCE
April 9, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Federal budget cutters are merging the two West Coast administrative regions of the National Marine Fisheries Service, a move that could leave California at a disadvantage. The merger will create one administrative region for the West Coast, saving an estimated $3 million in management costs. Currently the agency has two West Coast regions: The Southwest, headquartered in Long Beach, oversees California. The Northwest, based in Washington state, covers Washington, Oregon and Idaho.
FOOD
July 7, 2011 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times
When you reconnect with an old friend you haven't seen in a long time, it's only natural that you want to make the occasion kind of special. Maybe have them for dinner. In this case, literally. After a long three-year dry spell, California's salmon are back — well, at least a few of them are. So the big question now is: How to cook them? It's been a tough struggle for a fish that not so long ago was regarded as pretty much of a weekday dinner standby. But after peaking with a 2003 catch that totaled more than 7 million pounds, the bottom fell out of the state's fishery.
SPORTS
March 13, 1986 | Richard Buffum
Five skippers from the West Coast have entered the BOC Group Single-handed Race Around the World, which begins in Newport, R.I., on Aug. 30. The 27,000-mile ocean race, with only the skipper aboard, is the most grueling and dangerous of all sailboat races. The field of 54 competitors from 12 countries includes: Harvey Burger of Newport Beach, Dan Bryne of Santa Monica, Chuck Kite of Santa Monica, Dr. William Grant of San Diego and Mark Schrader of Stanwood, Washington.
OPINION
March 25, 2013 | By the Los Angeles Times editorial board
After years of depletion, California's fish populations appear to be bouncing back. A study this month by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported that hauls by fishing boats, which had been down as a result of years of overfishing, have been growing, along with earnings. The agency credits catch limits that were mandated by law in 1996 and slowly implemented over the next 15 years. A February report by the Natural Resources Defense Council found that of 44 severely depleted stocks of fish nationwide that were under federal oversight, 48% had rebounded to target levels and an additional 16% had shown significant progress - a total of nearly two-thirds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2011 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
Thick, tarry fuel oil disgorged into San Francisco Bay from a damaged cargo ship in 2007 was surprisingly toxic to fish embryos, devastating the herring population that feeds seabirds, whales and the bay's last commercial fishery, scientists reported Monday. Although the bay's herring spawning grounds are now free of toxic oil, studies have found that the moderate-size spill of 54,000 gallons had an unexpectedly large and lethal effect. The culprit, a common type of ship fuel called "bunker fuel," appears to be especially toxic to fish embryos, particularly when exposed to sunlight, according to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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