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Fishing Industry United States

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NEWS
October 24, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sushi and sashimi--Japan's two most prominent raw fish delicacies--are the world's newest villains in the battle to save endangered species. Environmentalists say Japan's seemingly insatiable appetite for raw fish is threatening to kill off the giant bluefin, the fat, delectable Atlantic tuna that is the staple of both dishes. Scientists estimate that, as recently as 20 years ago, more than 300,000 giant bluefin a year migrated along the western Atlantic.
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NEWS
December 27, 2000 | From Reuters
President Clinton signed legislation Tuesday banning "shark finning"--the process of removing the fin from live sharks at sea and dumping the animals back into the water to die--in all U.S. waters. The legislation, approved by Congress earlier this month, also provides for the initiation of international negotiations to prohibit shark finning and authorizes research to conserve shark populations.
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NEWS
June 19, 1998 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The river is his, 100 miles of silt-choked brown water and all the clams he can haul up from the murk until he drops from fatigue. Dan Davies has the entire upper Mississippi River to himself, a diver's paradise, but he wonders how long it will be before he too is banished from its depths. Beyond blades of sun leaching through the cottonwoods and river maples, Davies nudges his flat-bottom boat out to pools where the clams lay stratified on the sandy Mississippi bottom like bricks in mortar.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Clinton administration unveiled new Atlantic and Gulf Coast fishing restrictions aimed at rebuilding stocks of shark, Atlantic tuna and marlin, but environmentalists said the rules would not stem the severe decline of swordfish. Years of overfishing has resulted in so huge a drop in the number of Atlantic migratory fish that some species may soon be near extinction, conservationists said. The plan takes effect June 1.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1991 | From Reuters
A GATT disputes panel has ruled that a U.S. ban on tuna imports from Mexico violates international rules of commerce, a spokesman for the world trade body said Thursday. The United States imposed the ban in October, 1990, under environmental legislation, saying Mexican tuna-fishing methods killed dolphins that were caught in tuna nets. Mexico argued that the ban broke several General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade provisions, favoring U.S.
NEWS
June 29, 1992 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How about this for a controversial perspective: The greatest environmental disaster in Alaska history was not the wreck of the Exxon Valdez but the mismanagement and waste of the state's bountiful fishing resources? That's the view of maverick Gov. Walter J. Hickel, himself no stranger to argument. The surprising thing is that when he made the observation in his 1992 state-of-the-state message to Alaskans, few people scoffed. By the dozens, they nodded their heads in somber agreement.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Clinton administration unveiled new Atlantic and Gulf Coast fishing restrictions aimed at rebuilding stocks of shark, Atlantic tuna and marlin, but environmentalists said the rules would not stem the severe decline of swordfish. Years of overfishing has resulted in so huge a drop in the number of Atlantic migratory fish that some species may soon be near extinction, conservationists said. The plan takes effect June 1.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
After more than two years of debate, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced plans to curtail both commercial and sports fishing for 39 species of sharks in U.S. waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. The action, long advocated by marine biologists and environmental groups, came in response to a sharp decline in the population of sharks in recent years. Pacific Ocean waters are not included in the plan.
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | JOEL SAPPELL
August Felando is president of the American Tunaboat Assn. What no one seems to understand, complains 61-year-old August Felando, is that tuna fishermen love porpoises, too, and take no joy in killing them. "We have our own cult about the porpoise," said Felando, a third-generation fisherman. "We have drawings of them on our boats and each year we present the Golden Porpoise award to the skipper with the best record in saving porpoises while bringing in a good catch."
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Year-round use of devices to save endangered sea turtles from being trapped in the nets of Atlantic Coast shrimpers was ordered by the government. Earlier regulations had required Turtle Excluder Devices, or TEDs, only between May 1 and Aug. 31. The cage-like devices with a trap-door escape hatch prevent turtles from drowning in shrimp nets. Turtle-protecting regulations first took effect in 1989, and were hotly controversial among shrimpers in Texas and Louisiana, who staged blockades.
NEWS
January 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal councils charged with managing fisheries are failing to halt overfishing and protect essential fish habitat as required by a 1996 law, a coalition of environmental groups charged. The Marine Fish Conservation Network asked that Commerce Secretary Bill Daley reject a series of management plans being submitted by the eight regional councils because, the group argued, they failed to adequately protect fisheries. Virtually all species of fish have declined off America's coasts.
NEWS
June 19, 1998 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The river is his, 100 miles of silt-choked brown water and all the clams he can haul up from the murk until he drops from fatigue. Dan Davies has the entire upper Mississippi River to himself, a diver's paradise, but he wonders how long it will be before he too is banished from its depths. Beyond blades of sun leaching through the cottonwoods and river maples, Davies nudges his flat-bottom boat out to pools where the clams lay stratified on the sandy Mississippi bottom like bricks in mortar.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | MARK FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Consumers could pay more for a filet of their favorite fish once the government is through imposing the toughest and most comprehensive series of restrictions ever on fishing in U.S. waters. The rules will sharply limit the net amount of fish and places where they can be pulled from the sea, "and that's going to mean less fish," said Richard Gutting, executive vice president of the National Fisheries Institute, an industry organization representing more than a thousand companies.
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the first visit to Canada in a decade by a U.S. secretary of State, Madeleine Albright on Tuesday announced new steps to resolve one of the few bitter disputes dividing the two neighbors--a fight over lucrative fishing rights for the Pacific salmon. Speaking at a news conference after spending much of the day with Lloyd Axworthy, her Canadian counterpart, Albright said that newly appointed Canadian and U.S.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Thorstenson wryly calls it "the 56-hour fish war." When the season opened on U.S. pink salmon in southeast Alaska earlier this month, about 100 U.S. fishermen in boats along Noyes Island had precisely 56 hours to fish their faces off. That was the time allowed by U.S. regulators after a breakdown in talks for renewal of the 1985 U.S.-Canada salmon treaty, which was designed to fairly divide fishing rights while also conserving species.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The brawny floating fish factories that vacuum the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea with their 100-ton nets have become the latest target of the environmental group Greenpeace, which charges that the U.S. fleet threatens one of the nation's last robust fisheries. In a campaign announced Thursday, Greenpeace officials called for a ban on the ocean-going trawlers that scoop up more than 1 million tons of fish a year off the coast of Alaska, much of it processed on board.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
4 Nations Agree to Salmon Ban: The United States, the Soviet Union, Japan and Canada have agreed to ban salmon fishing indefinitely on the high seas of the north Pacific to protect stocks, the Canadian government said. The effect of the agreement was to close the fishery to Japan, the only one of the four that has a high seas salmon fleet. It numbers about 150 vessels. The accord is expected to take effect in the spring of 1992.
NEWS
June 2, 1988
The federal government imposed sanctions on the Port of Oakland and a contractor for dredging in unauthorized areas last month during the opening phase of a project to deepen the port. The Environmental Protection Agency said it is enforcing civil penalties of $150,000 against the port and $100,000 against Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Co., the maximum possible fines, for dredging outside the appropriate shipping channel in Oakland Inner Harbor.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1996 | VICTORIA BRETT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fifteen miles off the coast of Maine, the Coast Guard cutter Sturgeon Bay spots its target. Petty Officer Leonard Edwards and his team, armed with guns and wearing bulletproof vests, scramble into a small rubber boat. They race toward an aging fishing vessel, the Edna B., a wooden dragger out of West Point, Maine. "If they're in trouble, we're here to help," Edwards says. "If it's illegal, they better watch out."
NEWS
September 5, 1995 | JENNIFER CORBETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress is considering legislation that would open the door for sweeping changes in the U.S. fishing industry, allowing regulators to replace traditional open-market fishing with a quota system limiting the amount each fisherman can catch. The proposal, designed to eliminate overfishing that has pushed many fisheries into decline, is splintering the industry into a host of competing interests.
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