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Fishing Nets

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NEWS
March 18, 1991 | Associated Press
Navy divers Sunday blew up a World War II torpedo that had been brought up in fishing nets off the coast of eastern Long Island, the Coast Guard said. The 3,500-pound torpedo was netted Wednesday by the crew of a 75-foot fishing boat, the Shinnecock. The boat was scuttled in 60 feet of water 1 1/2 miles off Shinnecock Inlet because of fear that attempts to remove the torpedo from its deck might set it off.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By David Pagel
Alan Shields' second solo show in California (his first was in San Francisco in 1974) takes visitors back to a time when abstract painting was so uncool that the only people who pursued it were purists. Love of art for its own sake, and not as a path to fame or fortune, was the name of the game for painters like Shields (1944-2005), who went to great lengths to turn scraps of canvas, beads and thread into funky forms that flirted with the earthiness of folk art while wrestling with the functionality of craftsmanship and making a joke of tastefulness.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Superior Court Judge Martin Tangeman upheld a state Department of Fish and Game rule that bans fishing nets in the shallow waters along California's Central Coast. The rule in waters less than 360 feet deep is aimed at protecting sea otters and other mammals from drowning. A group of Morro Bay fishermen sued to have the rule overturned, and a trial was held July 1. The San Luis Obispo County judge issued his ruling July 11.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2012 | Tony Barboza
A California gray whale found tangled in a fishing net off the Orange County coast swam free after a lengthy rescue over the weekend. Whale-watching boats spotted the young cetacean stranded outside Dana Point Harbor with about 50 feet of netting and rope wrapped around its flukes, or tail. With permission from the National Marine Fisheries Services, Dave Anderson of Capt. Dave's Dolphin and Whale Safari attached a buoy to the animal to monitor it overnight as a team of whale-watch crew members, wildlife rehabilitation staffers and boaters with specialized training and gear assembled for a weekend rescue attempt the next morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
It was looking pretty grim Wednesday for the gray whale floating listlessly in the shallow waters of Dana Point Harbor. Experts said the whale looked emaciated and old, and some observers worried that the roughly 35-foot, 30-ton creature's days were numbered. But as news choppers churned overhead and a growing number of spectators watched from shore, the distressed whale's fortunes appeared to change. It took about four hours for a team of marine animal rescue workers to remove the mesh rope knotted around the whale's head and tail, said Tim Sullivan of the Ocean Institute in Dana Point.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Three dead sea lions washed ashore at Sunset Beach this morning, and a federal official said they probably had been trapped in fishing nets at sea. The sea lion carcasses were discovered between 10th and 11th streets at Pacific Coast Highway. "The sea lions probably died after being trapped in gill nets" of commercial fishermen, said Joe Cardaro, a wildlife biologist with the National Marine Fisheries Service in Los Angeles. "About 99% of the sea lion deaths in January and February were because of fishing nets."
NATIONAL
June 21, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
State divers and a fishing boat removed an abandoned fishing net near San Juan Island. Derelict fishing nets, or "ghost nets" as divers call them, can trap and kill marine animals, birds and even people. The state Department of Natural Resources and the Northwest Straits Commission teamed up to remove the fishing net that was snagged on a reef north of San Juan Island. The net is hundreds of feet long and weighs 2 tons to 3 tons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1992 | MARY HELEN BERG
"Summertime and the livin' is easy. Fish are jumpin' and the cotton is high." Well, leave out the cotton and you can apply the lines from this classic Gershwin tune to Manhattan Beach's annual Fishing Clinic and Contest this Saturday in Polliwog Park, where youngsters will be introduced to one of summer's most time-honored pursuits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1990 | DEANNA BELLANDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego police said Thursday they are looking for a man who mended fishing nets as a suspect in the killing of a 69-year-old night watchman who was found stabbed to death early Sunday morning aboard a tuna boat at the G Street Pier. The body of Joseph Ferreira Fernandes, a retired commercial fisherman, was found aboard the seiner Sea Quest by a morning watchman. Some passers-by who were near the boat about 10:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By David Pagel
Alan Shields' second solo show in California (his first was in San Francisco in 1974) takes visitors back to a time when abstract painting was so uncool that the only people who pursued it were purists. Love of art for its own sake, and not as a path to fame or fortune, was the name of the game for painters like Shields (1944-2005), who went to great lengths to turn scraps of canvas, beads and thread into funky forms that flirted with the earthiness of folk art while wrestling with the functionality of craftsmanship and making a joke of tastefulness.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2010 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Of the hundreds of sea turtles found dead along the Gulf Coast since the Deepwater Horizon oil-rig disaster, the majority examined so far appear to have died by drowning or aspirating sediment from the seafloor, a federal fisheries official said Thursday. Early findings suggest that many of the endangered turtles may have died because they were getting caught in fishing nets, not the oil spill — at least in the immediate aftermath of the BP accident. Investigators suspect that a last-minute shrimping season authorized after the April 20 blowout — and immediately before the first major wave of turtle deaths — could have led to the animals becoming trapped in trawlers' nets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
It was looking pretty grim Wednesday for the gray whale floating listlessly in the shallow waters of Dana Point Harbor. Experts said the whale looked emaciated and old, and some observers worried that the roughly 35-foot, 30-ton creature's days were numbered. But as news choppers churned overhead and a growing number of spectators watched from shore, the distressed whale's fortunes appeared to change. It took about four hours for a team of marine animal rescue workers to remove the mesh rope knotted around the whale's head and tail, said Tim Sullivan of the Ocean Institute in Dana Point.
SPORTS
March 23, 2008 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
Wither Roger Federer? The briefest of glances -- Federer's winning a mere five games against the 98th-ranked player in the world Saturday in the Pacific Life Open -- might suggest the answer is, well, yes. But the yes is not nearly so unequivocal when the identity of No. 98 is revealed: Mardy Fish, launcher of a thousand water-related puns and owner of an Olympic silver medal from 2004 Summer Games in Athens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2007 | From Times Staff Reports
A Cypress man was sentenced Tuesday to one year and a day in federal prison for selling an endangered fish from Southeast Asia that collectors pay thousands for on the U.S. black market. Bruce Penny, 37, sold Asian arowanas, also called dragon fish or lucky fish, to an unidentified man in New York, federal prosecutors said. He pleaded guilty earlier this year to a conspiracy charge.
NEWS
March 1, 2005
"A Little Fish Story" [Feb. 22] was so delightful and refreshing -- far from the other stories that directed the course of the day, from the drenching to the depressing. As a native of the South Bay area, I've always been familiar with the Redondo Beach Pier and can appreciate the pleasantly charming observations you made. Thanks for introducing us to some individuals who were interestingly ordinary, and routinely unique. Kerri Webb Inglewood I was under the impression the Outdoors section was about outdoor recreation, not a Hemingway-styled trip into depression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2005 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
California Fish and Game Commission President James W. Kellogg intervened in the criminal sentencing of a San Francisco Bay herring fisherman, telling authorities in a letter that his "good friend" has "suffered enough and that no additional punishment is warranted at this time." The intervention of Kellogg, a Concord-based labor-union negotiator who was appointed two years ago by former Gov. Gray Davis, was unsuccessful.
NEWS
August 4, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge in Washington ruled Thursday that Commerce Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher violated the law when he suspended regulations designed to protect endangered sea turtles from being trapped in shrimpers' nets. U.S. District Judge Thomas Hogan said Mosbacher's action on July 24 was a "total abrogation of the regulations."
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | ERIK WOLD, Associated Press
As many as 300,000 hungry seals have invaded the fiords of Norway's coast in search of food, competing with local fishermen and fouling their nets. Environmentalists say they are concerned about the extraordinary invasion but not all are in agreement on the reason for it. The seals came thousands of miles to northern Norway from their normal areas in the Arctic ice masses east of Iceland or from north of the Soviet Union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Superior Court Judge Martin Tangeman upheld a state Department of Fish and Game rule that bans fishing nets in the shallow waters along California's Central Coast. The rule in waters less than 360 feet deep is aimed at protecting sea otters and other mammals from drowning. A group of Morro Bay fishermen sued to have the rule overturned, and a trial was held July 1. The San Luis Obispo County judge issued his ruling July 11.
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