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Flamenco Dance

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NEWS
August 2, 1990 | MAJA RADEVICH
Flamenco dancing isn't just people stomping their feet. "Of all of Spain's regional dances, flamenco is probably the most exciting," said Roberto Amaral, artistic director and principal dancer of the Ballet Espanol de Los Angeles. "It is the native dance of the gypsies of Southern Spain, and it is a very emotional form of expression." Amaral and his dance troupe will be performing "Fuego Flamenco" at Santa Barbara's Lobero Theater, Saturday at 8 p.m.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2008 | Terence McArdle, McArdle is a staff writer for the Washington Post.
Mario Maya, a Spanish-born Gypsy who created memorable works of flamenco dance and as a choreographer broadened the scope of the traditional form by adding elements from modern dance, died Sept. 27 of cancer at his home in Seville, Spain. He was 71. Maya toured internationally and performed on Broadway, staging productions that combined flamenco dance and song with poetry and drama. They were programmatic works with a text and theme, often a message of Gypsy pride. His troupe served as an incubator for flamenco dance talent, including dancers such as Israel Galvan and Maya's daughter, Belen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2008 | Terence McArdle, McArdle is a staff writer for the Washington Post.
Mario Maya, a Spanish-born Gypsy who created memorable works of flamenco dance and as a choreographer broadened the scope of the traditional form by adding elements from modern dance, died Sept. 27 of cancer at his home in Seville, Spain. He was 71. Maya toured internationally and performed on Broadway, staging productions that combined flamenco dance and song with poetry and drama. They were programmatic works with a text and theme, often a message of Gypsy pride. His troupe served as an incubator for flamenco dance talent, including dancers such as Israel Galvan and Maya's daughter, Belen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2006 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
DOUGLAS C. RANKIN, producer of the New World Flamenco Festival, had a flash of inspiration as he watched Savion Glover in "Classical Savion," which had the 32-year-old dance star tapping to Vivaldi, Bach, Mendelssohn and other classical composers at New York's Joyce Theater last year.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | ADRIENNE JOHNSON
Benjamin Shearer was studying to be a classical guitarist when he heard some recordings of flamenco music. The emotional songs changed his career plans. "I heard them and I knew that was it, that was what I wanted to play," he says. "Flamenco is the human condition set to music. It has all the pain, the pathos, the passion--it's the human spirit." Thirty years later, he has stayed with flamenco music. He currently performs with the Carla Luna Flamenco Dance Ensemble in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1994 | SCOTT COLLINS
During the best moment of "Yerma," the revival of Federico Garcia Lorca's tragedy at the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, a group of Andalusian peasants performs a sinfully sexy flamenco dance during a pagan ritual called la romeria (the pilgrimage). The dancers' clapping and stomping ignites the second act, but unfortunately the moment arrives too late.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
The fiery rhythms and fancy footwork in flamenco dance can quickly dazzle an audience. But behind all the flamboyant display is an art form that is highly individualistic, says Maria Benitez, whose seven-member Spanish Dance Company will perform at 7 p.m. Sunday in UC Irvine's Fine Arts Village Theatre. "Individual feeling is very much the key," Benitez said in a recent phone interview from her home in Santa Fe, N.M, the company's base.
MAGAZINE
January 2, 1994 | Martin Booe
If it hadn't been for Carmen Amaya and Roberto Amaral's mother, there would be a lot less flamenco in Los Angeles. Amaral was 14 when his mother took him to see Amaya, the legendary flamenco dancer, perform. "I couldn't take my eyes off her," he says. "I didn't understand what I was seeing, but I knew immediately that I wanted to do it." Today, 30 years and many trips to Spain later, Amaral is arguably the leading figure in Los Angeles' flamenco scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2000 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a hot night--in temperature and talent--at the Hollywood Bowl on Sunday when "World Festival 2000" kicked off its six-concert series with "Fiery Flamenco." A blend of mostly traditional flamenco dance and music with some experimental fusion thrown in--not always for good measure--the program featured a number of sizzling artists who did live up to their billing. Generating the most heat was Noche Flamenca, an 11-member ensemble from Spain that rocked with a six-number set.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Heroic passion, devastating loss and a belief in the power of art make the ancient Greek myth of Orpheus an ideal subject for a flamenco dance drama. In what other idiom is every step so weighted with the fragility of human happiness and the inevitability of doom? Unfortunately, Compania Domingo Ortega's new "Orfeo" kept going awry at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre on Saturday: missing opportunities, failing to develop its best ideas and trivializing the most profound hallmarks of its source.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2005 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
At age 34, flamenco star Sara Baras doesn't dance with the weight of the art's resident sibyls or earth mothers. Nor does she embody private passions and the pride of the Gypsy underclass. No, at UCLA's Royce Hall on Wednesday, Baras danced for pleasure, connecting with her audience through eye contact and gestures -- even blowing kisses at one point.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Heroic passion, devastating loss and a belief in the power of art make the ancient Greek myth of Orpheus an ideal subject for a flamenco dance drama. In what other idiom is every step so weighted with the fragility of human happiness and the inevitability of doom? Unfortunately, Compania Domingo Ortega's new "Orfeo" kept going awry at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre on Saturday: missing opportunities, failing to develop its best ideas and trivializing the most profound hallmarks of its source.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2002 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oppressive pain, heroic defiance, percussive footwork as a tribal drum: The annual New World Flamenco Festival opened with primal statements of traditional Spanish Gypsy culture over the weekend at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. In a 90-minute program of solos performed without intermission, Compania Juana Amaya of Seville focused on the tension between showpiece virtuosity and emotional expression.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2001 | SARA SILVER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Carmen is driven by politics as well as passion. She fights for the rights of women and her fellow cigarette workers. She sings Andalusian folk songs and dances with a horse. And she expresses herself best, not through voice, but through flamenco. A new, radical "Carmen" was scheduled to receive its American premiere this week in a production by a troupe of Spanish dancers and musicians, La Cuadra de Sevilla, at City Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2000 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a hot night--in temperature and talent--at the Hollywood Bowl on Sunday when "World Festival 2000" kicked off its six-concert series with "Fiery Flamenco." A blend of mostly traditional flamenco dance and music with some experimental fusion thrown in--not always for good measure--the program featured a number of sizzling artists who did live up to their billing. Generating the most heat was Noche Flamenca, an 11-member ensemble from Spain that rocked with a six-number set.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2000 | JENNIFER FISHER, Jennifer Fisher is a regular contributor to Calendar
Sometimes, fate has a role in bringing flamenco collaborators together. Perhaps in a smoky Spanish club, they hear the right rhythms across a crowded room and hook up when the spirit moves them. But in the case of Laila and Adam del Monte--the dancer and guitarist currently generating heat on the L.A. flamenco scene--a rabbi had something to do with it. Maybe that's another kind of fate. Or maybe the rabbi was just lucky--not all part-time matchmakers have so much to work with.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1990 | EILEEN SONDAK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Of all the ethnic expressions seen on San Diego stages, flamenco dance is arguably the most elusive, despite the city's strong cultural ties to Spain. "I can't understand it," Rosa Montoya said from her San Francisco home. "I know you have a big Hispanic community, and you're so close to Mexico. But most people in San Diego don't really know what flamenco is. They may have seen it in a nightclub, but they haven't seen good, authentic flamenco. There's much more flamenco in San Francisco."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1986 | EILEEN SONDAK
With hair the color of corn silk cascading down her shoulders, Debbie Ray looks like the very antithesis of a fiery Flamenco dancer. But Ray, or Rayna as she is known when she performs the proud and passionate Gypsy dances of Spain, has never found her natural blond hair to be an obstacle to success. "When I was 14, I won a scholarship to work with Jose Greco," America's leading exponent of flamenco dance, Ray said. "He insisted that I wear my hair long and flowing. He said it looked like gold.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1999 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The best flamenco guitarists must understand the moves and motives of the dancers who perform to their accompaniment. Miguel Fernandez, a Pomona schoolteacher, played the instrument only as an aficionado. But he had become an expert on the style of his most cherished dancer, Maria Isabel, his only daughter. She had that bravado and air of arrogance that this ancient Gypsy dance demands.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1998 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cantes de ida y vuelta, a genre of flamenco repertory popular in the 1930s and '40s, translates from the Spanish as "songs that left and returned." The genre's name refers to music and dance traditions that left with Spanish conquistadors setting sail for unexplored worlds and returned bearing sounds and nuances of movement that ultimately led to new traditions. So, too, the Irvine Barclay Theatre enters uncharted territory with La Tania Flamenco Ensemble's "Abrazo: Cantes de Ida y Vuelta."
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