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Flamenco

ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2009 | Victoria Looseleaf
There was no dearth of duende -- soul -- at the Ford Amphitheatre on Saturday, when "Forever Flamenco: L.A. Ole!" took the chill off the night air. Produced by the Fountain Theatre's godmother of flamenco, Deborah Lawlor, the 2 1/2 -hour show sizzled with 10 singers, dancers and musicians. Unlike Hollywood, which worships at the altar of youth, flamenco operates in a reverse ageism universe, revering maturity, as evidenced in Roberto Amaral.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1999 | TRACY JOHNSON
Where flamenco comes with the featured fare. . . . * El Cid Restaurant. A visit to Spain without leaving L.A. Open for 35 years, this Spanish restaurant is all flamenco all the time. Show times: Wednesdays, 8:30 p.m.; Thursdays and Sundays, 8 and 10 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays, 8 and 10 p.m. and midnight. 4212 W. Sunset Blvd., Silver Lake. (323) 668-0318. All ages. Flamenco show plus prix fixe dinner, $23.75; show only, $9. Reservations recommended. * Sangria.
NEWS
January 27, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf
For the last few years, flamenco, the hotblooded art form that originated with Spanish Gypsies, has gained a following in the City of Angels. Barcelona-born Yolanda Arroyo, who began dancing at 9 and has lived in L.A. since 1982, is one of the more prominent purveyors of traditional "flamenco puro" in town.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY
The Arte Flamenco Dance Theatre wants to stamp out the notion that flamenco is the only form of Spanish dance. Flamenco is a dance from the south of Spain. "There's a passion and fury with flamenco," said Art Jauregui, managing director of the company that will perform today at the Los Angeles Theatre Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flamenco never has been a fixed traditional art form, but a changing one. "Each decade there's a new person who sets a new pace, a new style or does something innovative and different," flamenco dancer La Tania, in her 30s, said during a recent phone interview from San Francisco, taking a break from a tour that brings her to Irvine this weekend. "I'm from the younger generation," she said, "so what I dance, what I like, what I try to bring, is what's happening now in flamenco."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2002 | CHRIS PASLES
Get ready for another shakeup of what you think flamenco is. The annual Irvine Barclay New World Flamenco Festival, now in its second year, has stated its intention to expand local audiences' ideas about the dance form. For 2002, it is bringing two extreme companies from Spain.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2000 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Juan Talavera raises his arms like a supremely confident swan in preparation for dancing, you watch very closely. You know he's going to show you how to be elegant and steely at the same time, how to fill a room with the tiniest vibrations of the heels, and how to twist and flow with a spine so strong, it could support a monument and inspire the same amount of awe.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1997 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Adding unusual rhythms, musical instruments and movement vocabularies to the already rich mix of influences that makes up traditional flamenco, Yaelisa and her San Diego-based Solera Flamenco Dance Company gave an exciting, accomplished performance Tuesday in Bovard Auditorium at USC. Wearing a long, sleeveless dress for the spectacular solo "Contratiempo . . .
NEWS
April 17, 1990
Augustin Castellon, a Gypsy guitarist known to admirers of flamenco music simply as "Sabicas," has died in New York City from the complications of several strokes and pneumonia. He was 78 when he died Saturday at a hospital in Manhattan, where he had lived for 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With her fierce intensity and seamlessly expressive technique, La Tania evokes the power and mystique missing from so many programs in this era of debased flamenco stage shows. In a Soleares on Thursday at the Curtis Theatre, La Tania made every movement an expression of anguish and individuality, evoking unspoken narratives of inner and outer states.
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