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Flavored Milk

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HEALTH
August 23, 2010 | By Brendan Borrell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver visited an elementary school in America's "fattest" city, Huntington, W.Va., he saw the children tossing out fresh fruit in favor of processed chicken nuggets and chowing down on egg pizza for breakfast. But it was the sugar-laden chocolate milk that would stick in his mind, as he recounted this year in a speech he gave when receiving a TED Prize. "It epitomizes the trouble we're in, guys," said the star of ABC's "Food Revolution," a show that promoted healthy eating in public schools.
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NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Mary MacVean, This post has been updated. See below for details.
Much of the recent debate over serving milk to children has been about flavored milk: Should it be distributed in schools? Or should the only milk given to children be of the unflavored, reduced-fat variety? Two Harvard scientists known for questioning the conventional wisdom are challenging the idea of making lower-fat milks the only milk options available to children. They note that guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and many health organizations recommend limiting the consumption of beverages that contain calories - such as soda and juice - “except reduced-fat milk, of which people in most age groups are encourage to consume three cups daily.” David Ludwig and Walter Willett question “the scientific rationale for promoting reduced-fat milk consumption at these levels.” They suggest that until there are additional studies, guidelines for milk consumption should designate a range of perhaps zero to three cups, avoid recommending low-fat over whole milk and focus on limiting consumption of flavored milks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2011 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
Chocolate and strawberry milk are out. Next to go: Corn dogs and chicken nuggets. The Los Angeles Unified School District on Tuesday, with a 5-2 vote on a new dairy contract, became by far the largest district in the country to remove flavored milk from its menus, part of its effort to make school food healthier and help combat childhood obesity. The milk issue has overshadowed other changes in the district's food services division, which serves 650,000 meals a day at 1,000 sites.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Ladies and gentlemen, we have a new contestant in the who-can-top-this outrageous new fast food item: the bacon milkshake from Jack in the Box. The bacon shake is made with no actual bacon, just real vanilla ice cream, bacon-flavored syrup, whipped topping and a maraschino cherry, according to the website. We were thinking this had to be the most trayf food known to mankind before we saw the ingredient list. We'll get to the nutritional info in a minute. The item is proving to be somewhat polarizing, with some people loving the product (or the idea of it, at least)
OPINION
June 17, 2011
By all means, let's contribute to the health of children by reducing the amount of sugar they consume. Sugar provides little nutrition and no fiber, just loads of empty calories. Increasingly, it is implicated in the nation's higher obesity and diabetes rates. The sugar we drink seems to be particularly troublesome; various studies have found that sugar in liquid form doesn't make people feel satiated, so they consume yet more calories. The Los Angeles Unified School District's new ban on chocolate milk and other flavored, sweetened milks is one way to reduce such sugar consumption.
OPINION
August 21, 2011 | By Frederick J. Zimmerman and Beth Warshawsky Ricanati
The Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District is scheduled to vote this week on whether students need sugar to make healthy choices. Of course, the vote won't be structured that way, but sugar is what's at stake. The school board will vote on whether the district should eliminate sugared milk from its lunchtime offerings. Sugar will not go quietly. Last year, 76% of the milk served in the district was chocolate-flavored. Because each half-pint carton of flavored milk contains 8 grams more sugar than skim milk, last year alone about 5,600 pounds of added sugar was smuggled into children's diets through flavored milk.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Mary MacVean, This post has been updated. See below for details.
Much of the recent debate over serving milk to children has been about flavored milk: Should it be distributed in schools? Or should the only milk given to children be of the unflavored, reduced-fat variety? Two Harvard scientists known for questioning the conventional wisdom are challenging the idea of making lower-fat milks the only milk options available to children. They note that guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and many health organizations recommend limiting the consumption of beverages that contain calories - such as soda and juice - “except reduced-fat milk, of which people in most age groups are encourage to consume three cups daily.” David Ludwig and Walter Willett question “the scientific rationale for promoting reduced-fat milk consumption at these levels.” They suggest that until there are additional studies, guidelines for milk consumption should designate a range of perhaps zero to three cups, avoid recommending low-fat over whole milk and focus on limiting consumption of flavored milks.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Ladies and gentlemen, we have a new contestant in the who-can-top-this outrageous new fast food item: the bacon milkshake from Jack in the Box. The bacon shake is made with no actual bacon, just real vanilla ice cream, bacon-flavored syrup, whipped topping and a maraschino cherry, according to the website. We were thinking this had to be the most trayf food known to mankind before we saw the ingredient list. We'll get to the nutritional info in a minute. The item is proving to be somewhat polarizing, with some people loving the product (or the idea of it, at least)
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Chocolate milk in the cafeteria contributes to obesity in children, says one side. But without it, kids might not consume enough calcium, argues the other side. As school districts across the nation consider banning the cafeteria milk of choice (as well as strawberry-flavored milk), here’s a quick break down of the calorie content of chocolate milk from Fitday :  “Whole chocolate milk, made from whole milk, has the most fat and calories. An 8 oz. glass has 210 calories.” “Reduced fat chocolate milk is made from either 1% or 2% milk, and an 8 oz. glass has 160 to 170 calories.” “Skim chocolate milk, made from skim milk, is lowest in calories at 160 for an 8 oz. glass.” Chocolate adds about 60 calories to white milk—an addition that, if not done in moderation, could add several pounds by the end of one year (this article estimates 10 pounds)
NATIONAL
November 21, 2009 | By John Keilman and Tara Malone
The dairy industry recently rolled out an expensive media campaign in praise of chocolate milk, a classic school lunch drink that's under assault for its sugar content. As trade groups spend upward of $1 million to defend the drink, three fifth-graders have come to its rescue. A year after the school district in Barrington, Ill., banned flavored milk from its elementary- and middle-school lunch menus, students persuaded administrators to give it another chance. "Kids weren't drinking the white milk," said Haley Morris, 10. "It's better to have the chocolate milk than nothing."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Students in the Santa Monica-Malibu school district have grown accustomed to whole wheat pasta and lunchtime salad bars, with vegetables delivered fresh every day from a farmers market. But to the chagrin of some healthful food advocates and parents, chocolate milk will continue to be served too. The school board debated late into the night Wednesday before deciding to keep it on the menu. But parents can request that their children not receive chocolate milk. Like many districts across the country, the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District had joined the debate about whether the calcium that is valuable for growing children is worth the trade-off of sugar and calories that come with the flavored milk.
OPINION
August 21, 2011 | By Frederick J. Zimmerman and Beth Warshawsky Ricanati
The Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District is scheduled to vote this week on whether students need sugar to make healthy choices. Of course, the vote won't be structured that way, but sugar is what's at stake. The school board will vote on whether the district should eliminate sugared milk from its lunchtime offerings. Sugar will not go quietly. Last year, 76% of the milk served in the district was chocolate-flavored. Because each half-pint carton of flavored milk contains 8 grams more sugar than skim milk, last year alone about 5,600 pounds of added sugar was smuggled into children's diets through flavored milk.
OPINION
June 17, 2011
By all means, let's contribute to the health of children by reducing the amount of sugar they consume. Sugar provides little nutrition and no fiber, just loads of empty calories. Increasingly, it is implicated in the nation's higher obesity and diabetes rates. The sugar we drink seems to be particularly troublesome; various studies have found that sugar in liquid form doesn't make people feel satiated, so they consume yet more calories. The Los Angeles Unified School District's new ban on chocolate milk and other flavored, sweetened milks is one way to reduce such sugar consumption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2011 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
Chocolate and strawberry milk are out. Next to go: Corn dogs and chicken nuggets. The Los Angeles Unified School District on Tuesday, with a 5-2 vote on a new dairy contract, became by far the largest district in the country to remove flavored milk from its menus, part of its effort to make school food healthier and help combat childhood obesity. The milk issue has overshadowed other changes in the district's food services division, which serves 650,000 meals a day at 1,000 sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2011 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
An item that's on millions of kids' meal trays once or twice a day has become the subject of a food fight in school districts around the country, called everything from part of a healthy diet to "soda in drag. " How could a half-pint carton of chocolate milk be so complicated? The new superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District, John Deasy, said he will recommend that the school board eliminate chocolate- and strawberry-flavored milk in its next dairy contract for the 650,000 meals it serves daily.
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Chocolate milk in the cafeteria contributes to obesity in children, says one side. But without it, kids might not consume enough calcium, argues the other side. As school districts across the nation consider banning the cafeteria milk of choice (as well as strawberry-flavored milk), here’s a quick break down of the calorie content of chocolate milk from Fitday :  “Whole chocolate milk, made from whole milk, has the most fat and calories. An 8 oz. glass has 210 calories.” “Reduced fat chocolate milk is made from either 1% or 2% milk, and an 8 oz. glass has 160 to 170 calories.” “Skim chocolate milk, made from skim milk, is lowest in calories at 160 for an 8 oz. glass.” Chocolate adds about 60 calories to white milk—an addition that, if not done in moderation, could add several pounds by the end of one year (this article estimates 10 pounds)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2011 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
An item that's on millions of kids' meal trays once or twice a day has become the subject of a food fight in school districts around the country, called everything from part of a healthy diet to "soda in drag. " How could a half-pint carton of chocolate milk be so complicated? The new superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District, John Deasy, said he will recommend that the school board eliminate chocolate- and strawberry-flavored milk in its next dairy contract for the 650,000 meals it serves daily.
FOOD
May 30, 1996 | LAURIE OCHOA
Can a hip cow with sunglasses get kids to drink more milk? She doesn't have the name recognition of Joe Camel--or even a name, as far as we can tell--but the happy, backward-baseball-cap-wearing bovine on the label of the new flavored milk Moo Kooler is the great black-and-white hope of the American Dairy Assn. and the Dairy Council Mid East. Apparently California's "Got Milk?" campaign isn't enough to ease what a dairy industry press release calls the nation's "growing calcium crisis."
HEALTH
August 23, 2010 | By Brendan Borrell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver visited an elementary school in America's "fattest" city, Huntington, W.Va., he saw the children tossing out fresh fruit in favor of processed chicken nuggets and chowing down on egg pizza for breakfast. But it was the sugar-laden chocolate milk that would stick in his mind, as he recounted this year in a speech he gave when receiving a TED Prize. "It epitomizes the trouble we're in, guys," said the star of ABC's "Food Revolution," a show that promoted healthy eating in public schools.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2010 | By Julie Wernau
Blogging moms and nutritionists are criticizing a new formula for toddlers that comes in chocolate and vanilla flavors as an early start to obesity. "Is it really a good idea to get our kids hooked on all things chocolate at the same time they're learning to walk?" one blogger posted on Momlogic.com. "What's next, genetically modifying moms to produce chocolate breast milk?" wrote another. Introduced by Mead Johnson Nutrition Co. in February as a beverage for toddlers who are transitioning from infant formula or breast milk, Enfagrow Premium's toddler chocolate and vanilla formulas are milk-based but contain 19 grams of sugar per 7-ounce serving.
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