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April 26, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Poul Jorgensen was playing at being a fraud. "People think the Beaverkill is where the fly tyers sit all winter and tie flies," he told a Los Angeles audience of fly fishermen recently. "I don't. When the leaves are off the trees and all the fishermen are gone, I go out and take all the flies they left behind out of the trees and sell them." Fly anglers know Jorgensen as the creator of some of the most beautiful and delicately intricate artificial fly patterns in the world, the maestro of the craft.
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OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
The recent revelation that the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department secretly conducted aerial surveillance of the entire city of Compton for nine days in 2012 prompted outrage from the city's mayor, its residents and civil liberties groups. The Sheriff's Department justified the surveillance by saying it was only a brief test of a program provided by a private security company. A small, manned Cessna plane equipped with an array of cameras flew six hours a day and only in daylight, beaming video information back to the local sheriff's station.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2010 | By Kevin Thomas
A romantic adventure set in Las Vegas, the Southwest and rural Mexico, "Kites" has been given the no-holds Bollywood treatment by producer Rakesh Roshan and director Anurag Basu. In its telling, the love story draws from westerns, musicals, film noir, chase thrillers with stunts so preposterous they verge on parody — and it gets away with everything because of Basu's visual bravura and unstinting passion and energy. The film is free of both subtlety and irony, and it demands of its charismatic stars, Hrithik Roshan and Bárbara Mori, that they act their hearts out with the utmost sincerity.
SCIENCE
April 24, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Always hungry for blood, the tsetse fly packs a painful bite. Worse yet, its attack can leave a hapless victim infected with a parasitic disease that kills thousands of people - and millions of livestock - each year.  While Human African trypanosomiasis, or "sleeping sickness," has been declared a neglected tropical disease endemic to Sub Saharan Africa, new research is raising hopes that something might be done to slow its spread by targeting its...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1998
Re "Drunk Flies May Yield Clue to Alcoholism," June 12: Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a buzz. DAN SCHECHTER Los Alamitos
HOME & GARDEN
August 15, 2009 | CHRIS ERSKINE
Several large IKEA bags rest outside the little girl's bedroom door. She is leaving for college soon. By all estimates, she will barely sleep her freshman year, yet she seems to need $300 in bedding. So be it. I try to pick my battles. The other day, I got up early with the little guy, let his mother sleep in, and fixed him a fine breakfast of pistachios and leftover McDonald's milkshake, which he guzzled, naturally. So I followed that with some fried egg whites -- cooked slowly in little poker chips of fresh butter -- toast on the side, crumbs everywhere.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2014 | By Amina Khan, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Fruit flies could make some talented fighter pilots. Scientists who had the insects wing it through two laser beams watched the bugs make hairpin turns at blazing fast speeds, by banking in the same way that fighter jet planes do. The findings, published in the journal Science, shed light on these tiny critters' remarkable ability to evade predators (and fly swatters). [Updated at 5:15 p.m. PDT April 10: Tracking how these insects fly in response to a threat should help researchers understand the fruit fly's inner life, said Cornell University physicist Jane Wang, who was not involved in the research.
MAGAZINE
June 14, 1987
While William Jordan may feel some behavioral identity with a fruit fly, he has made a gross overgeneralization for the rest of Homo sapiens with "The Mystery of the Lek" (May 10). Attributing the same evolutionary forces to mate selection in flies and humans is bad science. It is even worse, however, to misapply biological principles to promote a particular ideological stance concerning social roles and behavior. Martha S. Witter UCLA Department of Biology Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
Hoping to kill those relentlessly annoying buffalo gnats--better known as black flies--before they become a problem, City Councilman John Ferraro on Friday introduced a motion that would allow the city to spend $50,000 to wipe out the ugly critters. In years past, the black flies have bred near the Los Angeles River. When they reached maturity, they annoyed park-goers, pets and horses from the Sepulveda Basin to Griffith Park to Elysian Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2008 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Agriculture officials will release millions of sterile Mexican fruit flies in parts of Los Angeles County to curb an infestation that could affect the state's agriculture industry. County agricultural commissioner Ken Pellman says four Mexican fruit flies, including one mated female, were discovered in the Azusa area this month. About 6.5 million sterile flies will be released in the area once a week to stop the reproductive cycle of the crop-destroying insect. Mexican fruit flies lay eggs in fruit, and when the larvae hatch, they eat through the pulp of the fruit and destroy it. Pellman said fruit has already been stripped from 64 properties near sites where the fruit flies were found.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Americans are split on whether airport screening lines make air travel safer. But at the same time, a majority of American adults worry that faster screening lines for travelers who submit background information might jeopardize airline safety. The latest measure of the public's attitute on airport security came from a poll of 2,234 adults in the U.S. by the Harris Poll. It comes only days after a teenage boy slipped undetected onto a Maui-bound jet at Mineta San Jose International Airport.
SPORTS
April 21, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
The Clippers needed an answer, and quick. They gave one, and wow. Their response Monday night to a playoff-opening debacle against the Golden State Warriors was powerful enough to temporarily subdue thoughts of the historic Clippers jinx while empowering dreams of a landmark Clippers spring. The answer was visible across the Staples Center sky in a flying Blake Griffin, and across the Staples Center floor in a skidding Chris Paul. The answer was audible on the Staples Center sideline with a screaming and confrontational Doc Rivers, and in the stands with thousands of red shirts whose owners' roars lasted deep into the sweaty night.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
In Thursday's “Scandal” season finale, Olivia finally seizes the opportunity to stand in the sun, boarding a plane bound for who-knows-where with Jake at her side, if not exactly in her heart. After the death of little Jerry, the bombing at Sen. Hightower's funeral and her own father's stabbing, Olivia decides that she is the real scandal, the common denominator in all the misfortune around her. What Olivia doesn't know is that by leaving, she won't be making things better, she's removing the last obstacle standing in the way of the person who's truly the problem -- dear old Dad. It's essentially a replay of her sabotage of B613 two weeks ago, which she thought would solve all her problems but only ended up putting Fitz's life in danger.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Ken Burns' new documentary, "The Address," which premieres Tuesday on PBS, is not at all what we have come to think of as a Ken Burns film. There are no celebrity voices reading documents of the dead; no narrator reading the words of Geoffrey C. Ward; no team of experts to elucidate the American past or an American pastime; no Buck O'Neil to bring back a world lost, but remembered. No "Ken Burns Effect," for that matter, the signature, all-but-patented, slow, close caress of old photographs that has taken his name.
SCIENCE
April 14, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Fruit flies seem to have a preternatural ability to evade annoyed swatters. Now, laser-wielding scientists have discovered the secret of these winged escape artists: They execute speedy hairpin turns by banking in the same way that fighter jets do. The aerial skills of Drosophila hydei , described this month in the journal Science, could provide insight into the complex neural circuitry that makes such impressive maneuvers possible - and perhaps...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before getting ready to fly back to D.C. The Skinny: Traveling to D.C. on Saturday for Passover on Monday. Given the cost of flying and renting a car, this will be a very expensive Seder. Don't worry, eating matzo won't stop me from doing the Morning Fix on Monday and Tuesday. Today's roundup includes analysis of Stephen Colbert's move to CBS and a preview of the weekend box office.  Daily Dose: Although it doesn't look like DirecTV is going to carry the Dodgers-owned, Time Warner Cable channel SportsNet LA any time soon, don't expect that to change the $3.63 sports surcharge the satellite broadcaster hits its Southland subscribers with every month.
NEWS
March 28, 1986 | United Press International
Palestine Liberation Organization Chairman Yasser Arafat ended a six-day visit to Cairo on Thursday and flew to the Iraqi capital of Baghdad, the Middle East News Agency said. During his stay in Egypt, Arafat met twice with President Hosni Mubarak for talks that centered on a formula for including the Palestinians in Mideast peace efforts, diplomatic sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1995 | ED BOND
The battle against those blood-hungry black flies with a taste for San Fernando Valley golfers has started early this year. "It was already getting out of hand," said Mike Shaw, superintendent of the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control district, which last week began spraying to kill the larvae of the black fly, also known as the buffalo gnat.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Talk about flying in the face of convention. Whereas many planes use a white or light color scheme, a newly painted Air New Zealand 787-9 is a study in black--a stunning study at that. The Dreamliner, whose paint job was completed Saturday at Seattle's Boeing facility, will be part of Air New Zealand 's group of 10 such aircraft but is so far the only one with the black scheme. Starting Oct. 15, the craft will carry passengers on a route from Auckland, New Zealand, to Perth, Australia, and also will fly from Auckland to Shanghai and from Auckland to Tokyo.  It's adorned with the fern, a New Zealand symbol that has its roots in Maori culture.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
NASA has a landing-on-Mars problem, and that strange flying-saucer-shaped test vehicle in the picture above may help them solve it. Since 1976, when NASA's Viking probe first landed on the Red Planet, the agency has relied on the same parachute design to help all its Mars probes and rovers descend to the planet's surface intact. So far, that Viking-era parachute system has worked fabulously. Most recently, it helped the 1-ton Curiosity rover survive its 'Seven Minutes of Terror' and land safely on the planet.
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