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Flight Of Phoenix

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1998 | ED LIEBOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A predictably eclectic luncheon in an East Village restaurant. Beef, fish and fowl are banished from the menu, which suits Joaquin Phoenix fine, since the actor has been a vegan from the age of 3 1/2. Phoenix's belt is made of fake leather, his sneakers betray not the thinnest strip of suede. He wears a Goodyear baseball cap, a drab shirt and trousers that once might have marked him as a full-service gas station attendant but now mislabels him as a hipster of Los Feliz.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1998 | ED LIEBOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A predictably eclectic luncheon in an East Village restaurant. Beef, fish and fowl are banished from the menu, which suits Joaquin Phoenix fine, since the actor has been a vegan from the age of 3 1/2. Phoenix's belt is made of fake leather, his sneakers betray not the thinnest strip of suede. He wears a Goodyear baseball cap, a drab shirt and trousers that once might have marked him as a full-service gas station attendant but now mislabels him as a hipster of Los Feliz.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2004 | From a Times staff writer
An ad for 20th Century Fox's new remake of "Flight of the Phoenix" in Friday's Calendar section featured a quote attributed to The Times: "A twist to die for!" But the review of the film two pages later said no such thing. So where did the quote come from? It was in an article that ran in the paper Nov. 21, written by J.P. Trevor about his father, Elleston Trevor, who wrote the novel "Flight of the Phoenix," from which the 1965 film was adapted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1985 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
The air and sea search for famed stunt pilot Art Scholl was abandoned Tuesday as the Coast Guard concluded that he did not survive the crash of his camera-equipped aerobatic biplane while performing an upside-down spin to get footage for a movie off the coast of northern San Diego County. The 53-year-old Scholl flew in numerous films, including "The Great Waldo Pepper," "Baa Baa Black Sheep," "Blue Thunder" and "The Right Stuff."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1998
Re your profile of Joaquin Phoenix ("The Flight of One Phoenix," by Ed Liebowitz, Aug. 13): Wow, what discipline. Herbal tea. No meat, no milk, no eggs, no leather products. I guess tobacco, being a plant product, must be healthy for you too. I hope Joaquin didn't learn everything he knows from his older brother or his wacky but loving parents. Whatever River learned didn't do him much good. CHRISTOPHER SMITH Camarillo The profile of Joaquin Phoenix brings up his siblings Liberty, Rain, Summer and, of course, the late River, but how come there's no mention that his own name was originally Leaf?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2000
Christian Marquand, 73, a French actor who appeared in 50 films, including the 1956 classic "And God Created Woman" starring Brigitte Bardot. Born in Marseille, Marquand began his career as a stage comedian and made his screen debut in Jean Cocteau's 1945 film, "The Beauty and the Beast." He had roles in English-language films including "Apocalypse Now," "Lord Jim," "The Flight of the Phoenix" and "The Other Side of Midnight."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2000
Stanley Ralph Ross, 64, an actor, writer and producer who co-wrote the book, music and lyrics for the musical "Chaplin" produced at the Music Center. Active in television and films for more than 30 years as a writer/director/producer and actor, Ross wrote more than 250 TV shows, with multiple scripts for "Batman," "The Monkees," "The Man from U.N.C.L.E.," "Columbo" and others. As an actor he appeared on television in "Superior Court" and "Falcon Crest," among others.
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
The old saw about undistinguished books making the best movie adaptations might easily be applied to the current vogue for remaking pictures as well. Though perhaps it is better to say "less well-known," such as the case with 1965's "The Flight of the Phoenix," a film that few would label a mint-condition classic but is nevertheless a solid and engaging drama about a group of plane crash survivors struggling to survive in the desert.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2004
Source: Nielsen EDI Inc. Los Angeles Times *--* MOVIE 3-DAY TOTAL VENUES AVG WEEKS (STUDIO) GROSS (Millions) PER (MILLIONS) VENUE 1 Lemony Snicket's A $30.1 $30.1 3,620 $8,304 1 Series of Unfortunate Events (Paramount) 2 Ocean's Twelve $18.1 $68.5 3,290 $5,509 2 (Warner Bros.) 3 Spanglish $8.8 $8.8 2,438 $3,617 1 (Sony) 4 The Polar Express $8.4 $123.4 2,868 $2,933 6 (Warner Bros.) 5 Blade: Trinity $6.8 $35.6 2,912 $2,341 2 (New Line) 6 National Treasure $6.0 $132.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A racing wooden roller coaster debuting this spring at a Chinese theme park will feature a first-of-its-kind element in which riders in dueling trains reach out toward each other and attempt to exchange high-fives. Dubbed the High Five by the American ride designers, the wooden coaster opening in April at Happy Valley Wuhan will be officially known as Dragon Wings. Riders traveling in parallel trains along banked tracks during the unique High Five element will tilt inward 90 degrees, allowing their upward raised hands to almost touch during the near-miss moment.
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