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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1999
Your coverage of the tragic flooding in Venezuela neglected an important part of the story. This latest flood is part of a global trend due to warming from greenhouse gases, mainly CO2 from the gas and oil we burn, and it is accelerating. Though we don't know where the next flood will hit, the climate is changing, and warmer air can hold more moisture. Perhaps we Americans can do something more lasting than sending humanitarian aid, by signing on to global treaties and cutting our energy usage.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 27, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
LOS ALGODONES, Mexico - Osvel Hinojosa knew that an infusion of water would bring the Colorado River delta back to life. But in just a few days, a U.S.-Mexican experiment to revive the delta environment has exceeded his expectations. The water is running deeper, faster and wider than anticipated in a channel that was once bone-dry. Hinojosa has spotted hawks, egrets and ospreys flying above the newly flowing water. He's even seen beavers. "It's just amazing to see that we can recover the river and see it alive again," said Hinojosa, water and wetlands program director at Pronatura Noroeste, a Mexican water conservation group.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2010
Where to check To find out if your home is in a 100-year-storm flood plain and subject to the insurance mandate, go to: msc.fema.gov
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Four female occupants of a car were killed after the driver lost control on a San Bernardino road Thursday night and plunged into a flood control channel, authorities said. The crash occurred after the car spun out and went through a rail, causing two of the occupants to be ejected while the vehicle plunged into the flood channel, burst into flames and burned the other two "beyond recognition," according to the California Highway Patrol. Earlier reports had put the number of dead at three.
OPINION
May 10, 2011 | By Bill McKibben
Last week, at a place called Bird's Point, just below the confluence of the Ohio and the Mississippi rivers, the Army Corps of Engineers was busy mining a huge levee with explosives. The work was made dangerous by outbreaks of lightning, but eventually the charges were in place and corps Maj. Gen. Michael Walsh gave the order: A 2-mile-wide hole was blasted in the earthen levee, and a wall of water greater than the flow over Niagara Falls inundated 130,000 acres of prime Missouri farmland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County supervisors proclaimed a state of local emergency Tuesday in Bouquet Canyon, an unincorporated area in Santa Clarita Valley, paving the way for officials to take flood control measures without going through the usual permitting process. Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich, whose district includes Bouquet Canyon, said a series of fires and storm events have led to a buildup of sediment in Bouquet Canyon Creek. That reduces its carrying capacity, which results in water flooding Bouquet Canyon Road after heavy rains, Antonovich said.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2012 | By Alejandro Lazo
A record number of investors and second-home buyers flooded the Southern California real estate market in December, though not enough to give sales in the region a bump over the same month a year earlier. With the investor dominance, low-cost homes reigned. That helped push the region's median home price back down to its lowest level in 12 months, according to San Diego real estate firm DataQuick. Sales fell 1.4% from the same month a year earlier, with a total of 19,247 homes bought throughout the six-county region.
SPORTS
September 11, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Tuesday is the 11th anniversary of one of the darkest days in U.S. history, the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Several sports stars have taken to Twitter to discuss their thoughts on what happened that day. From the Lakers: Pau Gasol: All my support to the everyone that lost a family member or a friend 11 years ago in New York. #NeverForget #9/11 Matt Barnes: Being in NY on 9/11/12, 11yrs after the planes hit the towers it's amazing to see how we've rebounded. From the Dodgers: Brandon League: #NeverForget911 Shane Victorino: 9/11 is a day that #wewillneverforget!
NATIONAL
September 17, 2013 | By Tony Barboza and Matt Pearce
BOULDER, Colo. -- Search teams resumed their efforts Tuesday to rescue hundreds of people still stranded by the Colorado flood waters as the death toll climbed to eight. Although hundreds of residents remain unaccounted for, according to state officials, the number has fallen in recent days to 648, state officials said. Harder to know is the number of people waiting to be rescued, Liz Donaghey, a spokeswoman for the Boulder office of Emergency Management, said by telephone on Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
“Myths, like inquisitive children, keep asking: why?” Marina Warner observes in an essay posted at the London Review of Books. “They answer with stories of origin and destiny, luck and catastrophe.” If anyone should know about this, it would be Warner . A professor at England's University of Essex, she may be our foremost authority on fairy tales. This is not, lest we think otherwise, kids' stuff; what Warner is after, rather, is what we might call the substance of our imaginative DNA. “Stories come from the past but speak to the present (if you taste the dragon's blood and can hear what they say)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Jill Cowan
Orange County is planning to receive about $83.2 million in federal money over the next two years to fund watershed and flood-control projects, including the massive effort to reduce the potential for flooding along the Santa Ana River. While the federal government has already authorized $45.9 million for this fiscal year, an additional $37.3 million is slated for approval with the 2015 federal budget, according to a list of recommended projects the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released Tuesday.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
About 350 people were stranded in eastern Montana on Tuesday when rivers overflowed their banks because of melting ice and snow. Hundreds of residents just outside the town of Roundup, about 50 miles north of Billings, have been cut off from outside help for more than a day after the Musselshell River burst through a dike and covered a crucial access road with several feet of water, officials and residents told the Los Angeles Times. The water is "up to the fence posts" and has gotten so high between the town and the stranded residents that “the county actually has a hard time getting a 'road closed' sign in on our side," Lance Redding, one of the stranded residents, told The Times.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Halliburton Co. and other U.S. corporations urged the Supreme Court to reverse a 26-year-old ruling that triggered an avalanche of class-action lawsuits by investors in publicly traded companies. But based on justices' comments Wednesday, it appeared they would fall at least one vote short of a major victory. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy explored the idea of a "midway" ruling that would make it slightly harder, but not impossible, to bring such suits.
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - In a rare moment of bipartisanship, the House voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to roll back flood insurance rate increases that have devastated many homeowners in coastal communities and dogged lawmakers on the campaign trail. The deal, brokered by Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) with a bipartisan coalition of coastal state lawmakers, sailed through the House, 306 to 91, despite protests from conservative Republicans that the changes would add to the national debt. "It is said by the media and others that we cannot work together," Waters said before the vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- While under investigation for allegedly taking bribes last year, state Sen. Ronald S. Calderon (D-Montebello) openly accepted $6,827 in legal gifts, including concert and fight tickets, expensive meals and travel from special interests, and a golf game from a group that investigators say was part of a criminal conspiracy, records show. The nonprofit group Californians for Diversity, which is controlled by the senator's brother, former Assemblyman Thomas Calderon, spent $265 to provide Sen. Calderon with a game of golf in September 2013, the lawmaker reported in his annual statement of economic interests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2014 | By Cindy Chang, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
The 110 Freeway was closed at the 405 Freeway in Carson because of flooding, Caltrans District 7 announced on its Twitter feed shortly before 6 p.m. The storm that hit Southern California on Saturday is expected to drop nearly 6 inches on downtown Los Angeles - and more in the mountains and hillside areas - by the time it moves on toward the Midwest and Northeast. Mandatory evacuation orders remain in place for parts of Glendora, Monrovia and Azusa. In downtown Los Angeles, a large hole swallowed a chunk of street in the 200 block of North Broadway.
OPINION
January 10, 2004
Re "Religion, Geology Collide at the Grand Canyon," Jan. 7: Creation science books make fascinating reading. Did you know that the sedimentary rock layers visible in the Grand Canyon were laid down by the Old Testament flood at the same time as the flood cut through them to form it? Amazing. Another interesting thing is that the vast amounts of water (many times the volume of all the oceans put together) required to cover the entire Earth to a depth of over five miles above the current sea level came from titanic caverns.
MAGAZINE
May 4, 2008 | Laurie Winer
Directing outdoor theater is challenging, but an ambitious family musical with tricky design elements and a cast of more than 200--most of them nonprofessionals and children--well, that's just insanity. And yet, this is the task for Peter Schneider, who is directing "Norman's Ark," a spirited new musical making its West Coast premiere May 27 at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre. Luckily, Schneider was the Tony Award-winning producer of "The Lion King" on Broadway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Hailey Branson-Potts and Bob Pool
A flash flood warning was issued about 7:15 p.m. Friday for central Los Angeles County as a band of heavy rain centered over the region. Rain was falling as fast as 1 inch per hour from Sunland-Tujunga to Beverly Hills. Urban flash flooding could occur through the 8 p.m. hour. Lightning was reported in Hollywood.  The warning was sent out via text messages on cellphones around the county. The National Weather Service warned of flooding on the 210, 5, 405 and 170 freeways, as well as the canyon roads between the San Fernando Valley, Beverly Hills and West Hollywood.  RELATED: Azusa hillside unstable, more evacuations ordered Concern was also high Friday evening in the foothill cities east of Los Angeles, just under the San Gabriel Mountains, where burned hillsides pose a risk of mudslides.  An unstable hillside in Azusa prompted police to order evacuations of all 26 homes on Ridge View Drive in the  Colby fire  burn area.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
“Myths, like inquisitive children, keep asking: why?” Marina Warner observes in an essay posted at the London Review of Books. “They answer with stories of origin and destiny, luck and catastrophe.” If anyone should know about this, it would be Warner . A professor at England's University of Essex, she may be our foremost authority on fairy tales. This is not, lest we think otherwise, kids' stuff; what Warner is after, rather, is what we might call the substance of our imaginative DNA. “Stories come from the past but speak to the present (if you taste the dragon's blood and can hear what they say)
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