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Flood Control Channel

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February 18, 1992 | JOANNA M. MILLER and AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Funerals were held Monday for four victims of last week's record rains--a pregnant woman, her full-term fetus, and her fiance, all killed when a mudslide pushed boulders through the bedroom wall of their Ventura County home--and a Woodland Hills teen who drowned in the flood-swollen Los Angeles River.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1991 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 15,000 gallons of raw sewage escaped from a sewer main Thursday, creating a monstrous stench and prompting work crews to build a dam in a nearby flood control channel after the effluent spilled into a storm drain. Despite the smell and possible health risk, no evacuations were ordered, officials at the scene said. Battalion Chief Allan R. White of the Westminster Fire Department said the sewage spill was discovered about 6 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the last natural stream beds on the floor of the San Fernando Valley is an ugly sight. The nearly two-mile stretch of the Pacoima Wash between the intersection of Woodman Avenue and Lassen Street south to Parthenia Street is a weedy, dusty eyesore littered with shopping carts and household trash. Apartment buildings back up to it. Graffiti mar fences along it. And in at least one place, a junkyard juts 20 feet into it. Historically, its headwaters are in narrow, steep Pacoima Canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1991 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last two miles of the Pacoima Wash will be converted into a concrete flood-control channel under a $6-million plan approved Tuesday by the Los Angeles City Council. When the project begun in 1984 is complete, Pacoima Wash will be confined within man-made structures from a point 1 1/2 miles north of the Foothill Freeway to the Los Angeles River, said Los Angeles County Board of Public Works spokeswoman Jean Granucci.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1991 | MATT LAIT
Bertha Velasquez said she has been slowly coming to terms with her daughter's murder of more than 10 months ago. The popular 16-year-old was found strangled and buried under a pile of pine needles near a flood control channel not far from here. It's the fact that her daughter's murderer has never been caught that still keeps Velasquez awake at night. "There's hardly a moment that I don't think about it," she said with a burst of tears.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1990 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Enforcing an obscure law locally for the first time, a state wildlife agency has prohibited county maintenance workers from removing trash and weeds from hundreds of county flood control channels since June, increasing the danger of fires and floods, county officials said Friday. "It's serious business. Our maintenance people can't do their work because they're afraid they're going to be arrested," county Public Works Director Arthur E. Goulet said. "This is bureaucracy run amok."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1990
A 16-year-old Cypress girl whose body was found near a flood control channel in Lakewood died by strangulation, according to preliminary autopsy results released Thursday by the Los Angeles County coroner's office. The fully clothed body of Zuleima Valdez, a freshman at Cypress High School, was found about 5:45 p.m. Monday by two teen-agers riding bicycles near the Coyote Creek flood control channel, not far from the mobile home the victim shared with her mother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1990 | WENDY PAULSON and TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bertha Velasquez had a bad feeling when her 16-year-old daughter told her she was going out to the beach with friends Sunday night. "I told her not to go, not to go," Velasquez said. "And she said: 'Trust me, trust me. Nothing is going to happen.' Then she left, and she never came back."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1989 | GREG JOHNSON
The San Diego River has always been a temperamental neighbor. Before construction of the existing flood-control channel that empties into the Pacific Ocean near Mission Bay, the San Diego River generally ran wherever it wanted during the rainy months. Until a flood-control channel was created in the late 1800s, the river often ran through to San Diego Bay. Planning experts now agree that it is unwise to allow heavy development in flood basins.
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