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Flood Control Channels

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1997 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kathleen Bullard eyed the sky nervously last weekend, wondering whether a few days of hard rain would wash away three years' work. Instead, the El Nino-linked storm vindicated her plan to turn a slice of Las Virgenes Creek into a sort of ecologically correct flood-control channel: natural enough to deserve its name, but strong enough to withstand the scouring rush of flood waters.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Permission to clear out Los Angeles County's clogged flood-control channels is expected to be granted Friday by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the agency's top regional official told the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday. But in an ironic twist that played itself out in a nearly two-hour debate Tuesday, political differences among supervisors may prevent the work from starting immediately, raising fears that winter storms could cause the channels to overflow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty feet below a smelly, trash-strewn path between a shopping center and a condominium complex, a wild forest of reeds and brush bursts forth from a barely moving stretch of Medea Creek in Agoura Hills. Defiantly green against the surrounding concrete, these cattails, arundo and willows provide an odd and incongruous patch of beauty behind a locked and rusting chain-link fence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been 14 years since a destructive El Nino storm dumped three inches of rain in three hours over Orange County, but Corrine Welch can't forget how the flood control channel near her home suddenly overflowed its banks and turned her neighborhood into a marshland. The infamous March 1, 1983, storm caused $48.5 million in damage, flooded 1,000 homes and displaced thousands of people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Grand Jury on Wednesday called for improved testing of waterways contaminated by urban runoff, better public notification of health hazards and the creation of task forces to encourage protection of each regional watershed. While acknowledging that the county has worked to address urban runoff, "the consensus is that it's not necessarily solving the problem," grand jury member Ronald Burczewski said.
NEWS
November 16, 1997 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County flood control worker Jim Dourte was patrolling his area along the Santa Ana River bike path when he abruptly braked his pickup and sprang into action. "Here's where I have a lot of trouble," he said, pointing down a dirt embankment. "Look at all the squirrel holes. There's one there, there and there! Don't step on them, they'll cave in."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1998 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four people, three of them youths, escaped serious injury Thursday in the shallow but swift waters of the Pacoima Wash, which Fire Department officials said illustrated the dangers of entering flood control channels even when water levels are low. The two incidents occurred less than three hours apart in Pacoima and Sylmar, where the wash channels water flowing out of the mountains. "We actually do more rescues in that area than any other," said Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1997 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County flood control worker Jim Dourte was patrolling his area along the Santa Ana River bike path when he abruptly braked his pickup and sprang into action. "Here's where I have a lot of trouble," he said, pointing down a dirt embankment. "Look at all the squirrel holes. There's one there, there and there! Don't step on them, they'll cave in."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2006 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
The New Orleans hurricane disaster, worsened by levees that failed, has prompted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to consider speeding up flood prevention efforts in northwest Orange County. At issue is a potential $330-million combined federal and county effort to fortify 77 miles of aging, substandard flood channels in northwest Orange County -- some flanked by crumbling earthen embankments -- that snake through backyards, gullies, industrial areas, wetlands and parks.
NEWS
February 14, 1986 | JACK JONES and ANDY ROSE, Times Staff Writers
Southern California escaped with only minor problems as a moderately heavy rainstorm moved east Thursday, but forecasters warned that a "vigorous" new frontal system could bring mud slides and flash flooding in some areas today and tonight. The National Weather Service said the second storm is expected to strike the coast head-on and have a stronger effect than the one that began Wednesday evening and dropped .93 of an inch of rain at the Los Angeles Civic Center and .
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