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NEWS
August 27, 1988 | Reuters
Heavy rains fell in mountains east of Tehran over the past several days, and the ensuing floods caused heavy damage and many casualties, Iranian Television reported Friday.
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WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Tom Kington
Tens of thousands of pilgrims were gathering here Saturday in heady anticipation of Sunday's dual canonization of two of the most influential popes of recent times, John Paul II and John XXIII. It will mark the first time in the long history of the Roman Catholic Church that two ex-popes are made saints on the same day. On Saturday, the Vatican confirmed another first - retired Pope Benedict XVI will assist Pope Francis during the sainthood ceremony. That means two living popes will help canonize a pair of their predecessors in a singular celebration of four pontiffs, alive and dead.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1999 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just past midnight on March 3, 1938, when Edna Wisser gingerly walked into her daughter's bedroom to wake her up, and to show her what nature looks like on a bender. "Mother woke me up sometime in the darkness of the night," said Marion Harvey, now 78, an Anaheim High senior at the time. "Very calmly, she said: 'I want you to look outside your bedroom window, because something is happening that you will never see again.' " She was right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | Kevin Baxter, Brian Bennett
Yasiel Puig's journey to Los Angeles - and riches with the Dodgers - is a serpentine tale of drug cartels, nighttime escapes and international human smuggling. Yet in the booming marketplace for Cuban ballplayers, it is far from unique. Since 2009, nearly three dozen have defected, with at least 25 of them signing contracts worth more than a combined $315 million. Many, like Puig, were spirited away on speedboats to Mexico, Haiti or the Dominican Republic. Once there, they typically were held by traffickers before being released to agents - for a price.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1997
When I was a little girl about 75 years ago, we were camping in Yosemite by the Merced River and it started raining very hard. The river flooded all the campsites. We had to pull up stakes and move to higher ground, but not before we watched watermelons, a slab of bacon and various camping equipment heading downstream. Floods are here to stay, but hopefully we can improve on the situation and fool "Mother Nature" someday! VIRGINIA THOMAS Alhambra
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
As coastal areas of New Jersey, New York and Connecticut are just drying out from horrific flooding prompted by Hurricane Sandy, more watery disaster has struck 4,200 miles away in Italy. Following torrential rains, Venice is experiencing unusually bad flooding. It's the fourth time floods have exceeded norms there since 2000. One of the world's great artistic treasures, the low-lying city of lagoons on the Adriatic Sea experiences problems from high waters every winter. Especially around St. Mark's Square, many of its Byzantine, Gothic and Renaissance buildings are regularly flooded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2013 | By James Rainey
A powerful thunderstorm blasted through Las Vegas and nearby communities Friday evening, flooding streets, toppling trees and trapping tourists inside casinos. Torrential rains and 70-mph winds also knocked out power in more than a dozen  locations, including Primm, the town that sits on Interstate 15 at the California-Nevada border. About 50 people had to evacuate from one condominium complex because of fallen trees, gas leaks and a loss of electricity. They took shelter at Desert Pines High School, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal . The National Weather Service declared a flash flood warning for Las Vegas and surrounding areas for Sunday afternoon through Monday evening.
WORLD
July 31, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
Three days of heavy rain and flash floods have killed at least 408 people in Pakistan, authorities said Friday, as rescue teams struggled to evacuate thousands of stranded villagers from submerged hamlets and towns in the country's northwest. Swollen rivers washed away mud-hut villages and wrecked bridges, roads, hospitals and communication networks across the region of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, formerly known as North-West Frontier Province. The death toll was highest in the northwest, where the destruction was the "worst natural calamity in the province's history," Information Minister Mian Iftikhar Hussain said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2009 | Corina Knoll and Ari B. Bloomekatz
Robert Lee was standing in his frontyard near the intersection of Coldwater Canyon Avenue and Dickens Street in Studio City late Saturday night when he heard a low rumble and saw water at his feet. Then he saw water gushing from a sinkhole. "Maybe 10 to 15 feet in the air, and it was making a beeline for our front door," Lee said, adding that a friend with him was swept off his feet by the rushing water. A rupture in a nearly 100-year-old, 62-inch water trunk line caused flooding several feet deep on some nearby streets, officials said.
WORLD
August 18, 2009 | Associated Press
Heavy rains have destroyed or damaged hundreds of shelters housing ethnic Tamils displaced during Sri Lanka's civil war, the United Nations said Monday. The weekend flooding has added to concern over the welfare of nearly 300,000 people who have been living in tents and makeshift shelters since the May defeat by government forces of the Tamil Tigers, ending their 25-year armed campaign for a homeland for the ethnic Tamil minority. Parts of the Manik Farm camp in the island's northeast were inundated, and about 1,925 shelters may have been damaged or destroyed, the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said in a statement.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
A series of dangerous thunderstorms pelted the Southeast on Monday, sending rescue crews to a central Alabama mobile home park where hundreds of residents were evacuated from flood waters after a creek overran it banks, emergency officials said. The storms spread overnight from Mississippi into Alabama and Georgia, triggering flash floods, causing power outages and shutting down roads. Every firefighter in the Pelham Fire Department was out in the field trying to remove residents from hundreds of flooded mobile homes at Green Park South, said Robin Wilkinson, administrative assistant with the department.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
A tornado was spotted in Missouri on Thursday night, the National Weather Service said, and parts of Texas were under a tornado watch. Rich Thompson, a forecaster for the National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., said at least one tornado had been seen in southeast Missouri.  The storm was expected to expand and hit parts of Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee, Mississippi and Missouri overnight. The tornado "is part of a larger severe storm,” Thompson told the Los Angeles Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By David Horsey
Until film director Darren Aronofsky got his hands on it, the old tale of Noah's Ark had devolved into a cute children's fable of giraffes and elephants and bears and bunnies crowding onto a big boat. Aronofsky has re-envisioned it as what it really has always been: an apocalyptic, end-of-the-world disaster story. Biblical literalists, though, are not entirely happy about this new telling of one of the most ancient stories in the Judeo-Christian tradition. Aronofsky's “Noah” opens Friday in theaters across the country and the big question for Paramount, the studio that paid more than $130 million to produce the film, is whether the large Christian audience that showed up for Mel Gibson's “The Passion of the Christ” and the more recent “Son of God” will pay to see what Aronofsky has called “the least biblical film ever made.” PHOTOS: Horsey on Hollywood If Glenn Beck has his way, no right thinking person will go see the movie.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
LOS ALGODONES, Mexico - Osvel Hinojosa knew that an infusion of water would bring the Colorado River delta back to life. But in just a few days, a U.S.-Mexican experiment to revive the delta environment has exceeded his expectations. The water is running deeper, faster and wider than anticipated in a channel that was once bone-dry. Hinojosa has spotted hawks, egrets and ospreys flying above the newly flowing water. He's even seen beavers. "It's just amazing to see that we can recover the river and see it alive again," said Hinojosa, water and wetlands program director at Pronatura Noroeste, a Mexican water conservation group.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Noam N. Levey
WASHINGTON - With a March 31 deadline to sign up for insurance under President Obama's health law approaching, more than a million people a day are visiting HealthCare.gov, administration officials said Wednesday. The site - the main portal for insurance marketplaces in 36 states - got 1.2 million visitors Tuesday and 1.1 million visitors Monday, according to the administration. At the same time, call centers received more than 500,000 calls over those two days. Despite the crush, the website, which crashed repeatedly last year, has been stable, said Kurt DelBene, a former Microsoft executive who has been overseeing the website operations as a senior advisor to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Here's a statistic for you. Out of 10,855 peer-reviewed articles in scientific journals last year that dealt with some aspect of global warming, all but two accepted human behavior as the primary cause. Oddly, that represents a bit of backsliding. The previous year, only one study rejected human factors, according to an annual roundup by geochemist James Lawrence Powell and reported by Salon . Science is not a theory but a process, a mechanism for distilling truth from observation.
NEWS
October 1, 2013 | By Jenny Deam
JEFFERSON COUNTY, Colo. -- The federal government shutdown on Tuesday has left Colorado officials scrambling to keep emergency relief and recovery operations continuing in the wake of last month's massive flooding.  Gov. John Hickenlooper announced Tuesday morning he authorized the use of state money to pay Colorado National Guard troops so they can continue with flood recovery. Under the shutdown they would not be paid, according to the governor's office. “We can't afford to lose one day in rebuilding areas destroyed or damaged by the floods,” Hickenlooper said in a news release.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Authorities and residents along a tree-lined river north of Seattle were bracing for flooding Saturday night after a massive mudslide in the morning killed at least three people, leveled at least six homes and left a muddy mix of debris in the river that was acting as a dam. Authorities worry that water could build up behind that dam of debris and mud and then cause flooding if it breaks through. Emergency responders from the U.S. Navy , fire departments and law enforcement agencies across the region were searching through dusk for additional victims and clearing debris, the Snohomish County Sheriff's Department said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Four female occupants of a car were killed after the driver lost control on a San Bernardino road Thursday night and plunged into a flood control channel, authorities said. The crash occurred after the car spun out and went through a rail, causing two of the occupants to be ejected while the vehicle plunged into the flood channel, burst into flames and burned the other two "beyond recognition," according to the California Highway Patrol. Earlier reports had put the number of dead at three.
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