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Floods California

NEWS
August 14, 1989 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Staff Writer
Another sunny day aided heavy equipment crews as they worked round-the-clock Sunday to clear tons of mud and debris that last week's thunderstorms and flash floods dumped into a two-mile stretch of the Los Angeles Aqueduct near Olancha, 180 miles north of Los Angeles. "We are on schedule for our two-week completion date. Things are progressing as we had expected," said Department of Water and Power spokesman Ed Freudenberg.
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NEWS
March 20, 1989
Drought doesn't mean much in Quincy. The small Sierra Nevada city in northeast California is practically awash in water. Just days ago, the Plumas County seat was inundated with rain and heavily saturated snow that caused scores of power failures and minor flooding. Tributaries to the nearby Feather River swelled ominously.
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
More heavy rain fell on eastern North Carolina, delaying the ebb of flooding that has destroyed hundreds of homes since Hurricane Floyd, but forecasters promised a dry spell was on the way. The latest rains flooded most of the streets in Goldsboro, N.C., ruptured a dam and pushed up the Tar and Neuse rivers. In one more weather blow, the latest system spawned tornadoes that downed trees and damaged homes in the central part of the state.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1995 | LAURA B. BENKO and JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Businesses in rain-pummeled California were left at the mercy of recent storms, which flooded streets and threatened stores, snarled traffic and forced potential customers indoors. The rainy conditions disrupted truck traffic across the state, delaying and in some cases forcing the cancellation of a wide variety of food and merchandise shipments. Joseph M. Nieves, vice president at Los Angeles-based Qwikway Trucking Co., said the company called in additional drivers Tuesday to deal with delays.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1995 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what has become a post-disaster ritual for California businesses, numerous lenders and retailers have offered assistance to the victims of this month's storms, with low-interest loans and deferrals on home mortgage and credit card payments. "Knowing that these things are lurking, we have (disaster assistance programs) pretty much ready to go," said Wells Fargo spokeswoman Kathleen Shilkret. "Unfortunately, we have had too much call for this."
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rising seas caused by warmth trapped in polluted air could inundate $48 billion worth of property along San Francisco Bay over the next century unless preventive action is taken, a Berkeley research organization estimates in a report released today. The impact of global warming, the so-called greenhouse effect, projected by the nonprofit Pacific Institute, is a worst-case scenario based on a one-meter rise in sea level from melting land ice and expansion of the oceans themselves as they warm.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
State and federal auditors have charged that Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta farmers misused upward of $10 million in disaster aid to save their sinking islands from floods and are preparing a demand that it be repaid. Auditors charged that there were instances of double-billing, charges for material that apparently was not delivered and widespread overcharges for rock and sand that was used to bolster island levees in the delta. "I think there is a fiduciary duty that needs to be exercised.
NEWS
February 4, 1998 | STEPHANIE SIMON and MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two storm systems bashed California with dark fury Tuesday, forcing thousands of residents to flee fast-rising rivers in the north and creating havoc in the Southland as trees toppled, freeways flooded and roofs blew away in the tremendous winds. Fourteen counties declared local emergencies, the precursor to requesting federal disaster relief.
NEWS
April 7, 1995
The White House announced Thursday that the government is providing $15 million in temporary job relief for workers displaced by devastating flooding in California. Labor Secretary Robert Reich said the money is in addition to a $10-million jobs grant announced earlier. The Clinton Administration has poured hundreds of millions of dollars into California to help the state recover from a long series of disasters, including earthquakes, riots, fires and now floods and mudslides.
NEWS
November 16, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
A state audit, citing faulty record-keeping and possibly illegal acts, urges state and federal disaster agencies not to reimburse local reclamation districts for $25.8 million of $27.3 million spent to fight floods in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta four years ago. If the disaster agencies withhold aid, the already financially strapped reclamation districts say they are likely to go bankrupt. The districts are responsible for maintenance and repair of the delta levees.
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