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Floods Egypt

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NEWS
November 5, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh flooding swept through southern Egypt on Friday, drenching 70 additional villages, seeping water into some of the historic tombs of the pharaohs and collapsing 500 houses on the west bank of the Nile at Luxor. And as survivors of a burning flood that surged from a fuel depot about 200 miles south of Cairo this week began burying their dead, the discovery of dozens of new corpses pushed the death toll from the bizarre tragedy to more than 500.
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WORLD
September 17, 2005 | From Associated Press
Thousands of Palestinians broke through Egyptian and Palestinian Authority lines on the Gaza border Friday, pouring into Egypt in defiance of government attempts to secure the frontier. Amos Gilad, a senior Israeli defense official, said the Palestinian Authority's credibility was on the line over its failure to stop gunrunners and others from crossing. Palestinians pelted their own security forces with stones at the Saladin gate, the main informal crossing in this border town.
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NEWS
December 26, 1988 | From Reuters
At least seven people were killed in unseasonably heavy rainstorms sweeping across northern Egypt, newspapers reported Sunday. Two houses in Cairo collapsed under the weight of the rains, killing one person and injuring two. Two people were electrocuted and killed in the Nile Delta town of Tanta and four people died in flood-related road accidents. The downpour started Friday evening and disrupted road and rail traffic.
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a week after heavy flash floods swept through southern Egypt, new assessments show damage far worse than originally feared, with more than 36,000 homes destroyed or badly damaged, 151 schools collapsed and 20,975 acres of cropland--the livelihood of thousands of Nile Valley peasants--submerged under the killing waters.
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a week after heavy flash floods swept through southern Egypt, new assessments show damage far worse than originally feared, with more than 36,000 homes destroyed or badly damaged, 151 schools collapsed and 20,975 acres of cropland--the livelihood of thousands of Nile Valley peasants--submerged under the killing waters.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | SAMIA NAKHOUL, REUTERS
Western and Arab tourists cross paths at dawn in the lobbies of Cairo's luxury hotels. The Westerners rise early before the scorching desert sun to visit the pyramids just as Persian Gulf Arabs return from heavy nights out on the town. Egypt's legions of hotels are jam-packed this year. Its pyramids, monuments, temples, cruise liners, restaurants, nightclubs, casinos and beaches are swarming with visitors from all over the globe after a long drought during the Gulf War.
WORLD
September 17, 2005 | From Associated Press
Thousands of Palestinians broke through Egyptian and Palestinian Authority lines on the Gaza border Friday, pouring into Egypt in defiance of government attempts to secure the frontier. Amos Gilad, a senior Israeli defense official, said the Palestinian Authority's credibility was on the line over its failure to stop gunrunners and others from crossing. Palestinians pelted their own security forces with stones at the Saladin gate, the main informal crossing in this border town.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh flooding swept through southern Egypt on Friday, drenching 70 additional villages, seeping water into some of the historic tombs of the pharaohs and collapsing 500 houses on the west bank of the Nile at Luxor. And as survivors of a burning flood that surged from a fuel depot about 200 miles south of Cairo this week began burying their dead, the discovery of dozens of new corpses pushed the death toll from the bizarre tragedy to more than 500.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | SAMIA NAKHOUL, REUTERS
Western and Arab tourists cross paths at dawn in the lobbies of Cairo's luxury hotels. The Westerners rise early before the scorching desert sun to visit the pyramids just as Persian Gulf Arabs return from heavy nights out on the town. Egypt's legions of hotels are jam-packed this year. Its pyramids, monuments, temples, cruise liners, restaurants, nightclubs, casinos and beaches are swarming with visitors from all over the globe after a long drought during the Gulf War.
NEWS
December 26, 1988 | From Reuters
At least seven people were killed in unseasonably heavy rainstorms sweeping across northern Egypt, newspapers reported Sunday. Two houses in Cairo collapsed under the weight of the rains, killing one person and injuring two. Two people were electrocuted and killed in the Nile Delta town of Tanta and four people died in flood-related road accidents. The downpour started Friday evening and disrupted road and rail traffic.
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