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Floods Indiana

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December 7, 1990 | Associated Press
About 120 residents of a flood-ravaged housing subdivision were barred from returning to their homes after cancer-causing PCBs were discovered at unacceptably high levels, officials said Thursday. Test results shared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency led the state to declare the houses off limits to residents who were hoping to return for personal items. The EPA said it found double the acceptable levels of PCBs.
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NEWS
March 11, 1997 | From Times Wires Services
Thousands of volunteers pitched in Monday to help residents haul away debris and rinse off layers of mud left by a week of devastating flooding along the Ohio River. "It's been fantastic. We've had church groups and children's homes help us out," said Sharon Thompson, a Red Cross center manager in Radcliffe, Ky., 30 miles southwest of Louisville.
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NEWS
May 22, 1990 | From United Press International
New waves of powerful thunderstorms with winds up to 64 m.p.h. battered already flooded parts of Arkansas on Monday, knocking out power to thousands of homes and aggravating the misery from weekend flash floods that turned streets into roiling rivers. In southeastern Texas, storm clouds threatened to dump more water into the Trinity River, already 10 miles wide in places. Overflow from the Trinity already has swamped about 4,600 homes, and many of them will remain under water for weeks.
NEWS
March 10, 1997 | From Reuters
More rain plagued the flood-stricken Ohio River valley Sunday, causing some streams to rise again and slowing the monumental cleanup from the area's worst deluge in more than three decades. Compared with the foot of rain that fell in the region a week ago, however, the new rains were more a nuisance than a threat to life and property. The Licking River, a tributary of the Ohio in central Kentucky, was rising again Sunday near Falmouth, a town devastated by last week's flooding.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | From Associated Press
Louisville, Ky., bolted the gates shut in its flood wall Tuesday as the highest water along the Ohio River in 30 years pushed downstream, swamping one town after another and swelling the ranks of people driven from their homes. The Ohio was out of its banks from West Virginia to Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana, and the water was not expected to crest in most places until today or later.
NEWS
March 6, 1997 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A river is not gauged easily, not when slate-gray clouds slant down rain for days, holler creeks spill over and stream banks dissolve like wet powder. Pity the unfortunate town that straddles two immeasurable rivers. Pity West Point. Among all the river towns in Kentucky and Indiana that retreated Wednesday from the rising tide of the rain-swollen Ohio, West Point found there was no place to flee: At its back lapped the sullen brown waters of the overflowing Salt River.
NEWS
March 11, 1997 | From Times Wires Services
Thousands of volunteers pitched in Monday to help residents haul away debris and rinse off layers of mud left by a week of devastating flooding along the Ohio River. "It's been fantastic. We've had church groups and children's homes help us out," said Sharon Thompson, a Red Cross center manager in Radcliffe, Ky., 30 miles southwest of Louisville.
NEWS
March 10, 1997 | From Reuters
More rain plagued the flood-stricken Ohio River valley Sunday, causing some streams to rise again and slowing the monumental cleanup from the area's worst deluge in more than three decades. Compared with the foot of rain that fell in the region a week ago, however, the new rains were more a nuisance than a threat to life and property. The Licking River, a tributary of the Ohio in central Kentucky, was rising again Sunday near Falmouth, a town devastated by last week's flooding.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | From United Press International
President Bush declared flood-stricken central Indiana a disaster area Saturday, but the soggy area was pretty much spared the snow and ice brought to the Midwest by a wintry storm threatening travel by land and air. Rain moistened a parched part of the West, and snow fell in the plains and Rocky Mountains.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From United Press International
Residents began cleaning up as flooded rivers in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio receded Tuesday, but Indiana's high waters were expected to continue for the rest of the week, the National Weather Service reported. Heavy rain combined with an unseasonsable snow melt were blamed for the flooding. Flood warnings remained in effect for western Pennsylvania, where the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers crested slightly above flood stage during the night and were receding.
NEWS
March 6, 1997 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A river is not gauged easily, not when slate-gray clouds slant down rain for days, holler creeks spill over and stream banks dissolve like wet powder. Pity the unfortunate town that straddles two immeasurable rivers. Pity West Point. Among all the river towns in Kentucky and Indiana that retreated Wednesday from the rising tide of the rain-swollen Ohio, West Point found there was no place to flee: At its back lapped the sullen brown waters of the overflowing Salt River.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | From Associated Press
Louisville, Ky., bolted the gates shut in its flood wall Tuesday as the highest water along the Ohio River in 30 years pushed downstream, swamping one town after another and swelling the ranks of people driven from their homes. The Ohio was out of its banks from West Virginia to Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana, and the water was not expected to crest in most places until today or later.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Up to a foot of rain flooded parts of central and southern Indiana on Tuesday, closing Interstate 70 and other roads and forcing residents to evacuate from several communities. There were no immediate reports of injuries. Storms also produced lightning believed to have touched off fires at a lumber company in Martinsville and at homes in Morgan and Bartholomew counties, authorities said.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | From United Press International
President Bush declared flood-stricken central Indiana a disaster area Saturday, but the soggy area was pretty much spared the snow and ice brought to the Midwest by a wintry storm threatening travel by land and air. Rain moistened a parched part of the West, and snow fell in the plains and Rocky Mountains.
NEWS
January 4, 1991 | From Associated Press
High water streaming across Indiana that has forced nearly 2,000 people out of their homes threatened more communities Thursday in the southern part of the state. Elsewhere, high water on the Ohio River caused flooding in West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio, and some towns closed gates in their flood walls. In Indiana, weakened levees in Elnora and Hazleton were holding their own against the rising White River.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Levees failed in three southern Indiana communities and other levees were sandbagged as floodwaters from central and northern Indiana coursed downstream. Along the still-rising Wabash River, Terre Haute residents and volunteers from a prison worked through the night. "Just about every place . . . protected from the river by levees is in jeopardy right now," Vigo County civil defense director Richard Setliff said. One death was blamed on the flooding, caused by rain and snowmelt.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Levees failed in three southern Indiana communities and other levees were sandbagged as floodwaters from central and northern Indiana coursed downstream. Along the still-rising Wabash River, Terre Haute residents and volunteers from a prison worked through the night. "Just about every place . . . protected from the river by levees is in jeopardy right now," Vigo County civil defense director Richard Setliff said. One death was blamed on the flooding, caused by rain and snowmelt.
NEWS
January 1, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Flooding forced thousands of people to head for higher ground Monday in Indiana, and the latest cold wave extended deep into the South. Indianapolis Mayor William Hudnut declared an emergency after more than 400 homes, with an estimated 2,000 people, were evacuated along the White River. Indiana's Emergency Management Agency estimated that 800 homes in 18 counties had been evacuated from Saturday to midday Monday. "This is a 50-year flood. That's what they're calling it now," Hudnut said.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From United Press International
Residents began cleaning up as flooded rivers in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio receded Tuesday, but Indiana's high waters were expected to continue for the rest of the week, the National Weather Service reported. Heavy rain combined with an unseasonsable snow melt were blamed for the flooding. Flood warnings remained in effect for western Pennsylvania, where the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers crested slightly above flood stage during the night and were receding.
NEWS
January 1, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Flooding forced thousands of people to head for higher ground Monday in Indiana, and the latest cold wave extended deep into the South. Indianapolis Mayor William Hudnut declared an emergency after more than 400 homes, with an estimated 2,000 people, were evacuated along the White River. Indiana's Emergency Management Agency estimated that 800 homes in 18 counties had been evacuated from Saturday to midday Monday. "This is a 50-year flood. That's what they're calling it now," Hudnut said.
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