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Floods Mexico

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NEWS
September 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
Mexican troops, doctors and rescue workers struggled Wednesday to reach scores of southern towns swamped by floods as heavy rains pelted some areas for the seventh straight day. At least 33 people have been reported killed, and dozens more were missing in flooding across the country. The Pacific coastal zones of the southern state of Chiapas have been the most devastated.
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WORLD
November 5, 2007 | Maria Antonieta Uribe and Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writers
As thousands of people waited for flights out of the flood-ravaged state of Tabasco where as many as 1 million have been displaced, a handful more made their way Sunday to the international airport here. "We had a half a tank of gas in the rental car and we thought, 'What are we waiting for?' " said Francoise Cerceau, who drove more than 100 miles east from Villahermosa early Sunday with her husband and 14-year-old son to escape the disaster.
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NEWS
October 8, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
With dozens of people believed buried alive in mudslides, rescue workers struggled Thursday to reach remote towns in southern and central Mexico, where flooding brought on by more than a week of rain has killed at least 218 people. Official death tolls soared throughout the day as rescue workers fought through mudslides for buried victims using everything from bulldozers to buckets to bare hands.
NEWS
June 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Mudslides triggered by heavy rain killed two people and injured three others in central Mexico on Thursday, while flooding damaged hundreds of homes. A 60-year-old farmer was killed when a hillside gave way while he was working in his fields in a village about 100 miles from Mexico City. A 60-year-old woman and a 6-year-old boy who were with the farmer were injured in the slide and taken to a nearby hospital.
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The death toll from a week of devastating floods in Mexico topped 320 Saturday as rescue workers pressed on with the grim task of digging out people buried when a mudslide engulfed an entire village. The extent of what President Ernesto Zedillo called the "tragedy of the decade" was becoming starkly clear as the rains eased and rescue workers were able to reach villages that had been cut off for days.
NEWS
February 9, 1998 | H.G. REZA and DAVE LESHER and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A series of harsh winter storms gave most state residents a brief break Sunday after hitting Baja California with a vengeance, killing at least 13 people in widespread flash flooding throughout the border area. The overnight storm hit the cities of Tijuana and Rosarito hardest, forcing the evacuation of 220 people in Tijuana alone. An estimated 500 others were trapped in their homes by flood waters, which had destroyed or damaged at least 300 residences, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Laura Wadhams and her sister, Pamela Muckleroy, deliverance from flood-ravaged Baja California Norte came on the wings of a plane chartered by their father, Golden West College math professor, John Wadhams. Stranded with hundreds of other U.S. tourists in the town of Vicente Guerrero, north of San Quintin, about 200 miles south of the border, the two young women were relieved to see a jaunty pilot emerge Sunday from the aircraft with hamburgers and soft drinks.
NEWS
February 10, 1998 | H.G. REZA and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As a wall of water crashed through their impoverished colonia 3 de Octubre neighborhood, Andrea Quintero helplessly watched her husband being swept away to his death. "I saw [his] truck go tumbling in the water and my husband disappear," Quintero, 30, said Monday, pain and horror still etched on her face. "He never yelled. I couldn't believe what happened. I called out his name, but he didn't answer." Shortly after 3 a.m.
NEWS
September 24, 1990 | Associated Press
What was believed to be the heaviest rainstorm in 90 years flooded large sections of this northern Mexico state capital by Sunday, killing at least 40 people and leaving more than 5,000 homeless, authorities said. Another 30 people were reported missing by the Red Cross. The storm hit Saturday night dumping more than 5 inches in the area around Chihuahua City, about 200 miles south of El Paso. It was still raining in the city of 600,000 late Sunday.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ernesto Zedillo acknowledged Monday that many Mexican villages were still desperate for food nearly a week after being devastated by floods, but he chastised politicians who have criticized the government relief effort. "It's simply not fair to take advantage of this tragedy to gain space in a newspaper or TV or radio news show," declared the president, who then donned a red slicker and sloshed through the muddy remains of a shattered neighborhood in Puebla state.
NEWS
October 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A new surge of flood water in the devastated state of Tabasco has apparently killed six people, officials said, adding to the toll of hundreds who have died in storms over the last month. An estimated 120,000 of the 465,000 residents of the Villahermosa area remained evacuated. Almost incessant rain that began in mid-September has repeatedly flooded coastal communities and filled dams to the bursting point. Local and state officials have now reported at least 404 deaths.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
Authorities opened the gates to an over-capacity dam Saturday, acknowledging that rivers already dangerously high because of weeks of heavy flooding would rise even more. Also Saturday, three more deaths were reported from relentless floods that have killed more than 400 people in southeastern Mexico. The National Water Commission began releasing water from the Penitas dam upstream in the state of Chiapas at 2 a.m. Saturday, a move that officials said would increase river levels by .
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
With help slow in arriving to thousands of people cut off by flooding, desperate residents of one village in Hidalgo state stole aid that was intended for other communities, local officials said Monday. The theft occurred Sunday, the same day that President Ernesto Zedillo declared that the "critical phase of the emergency" had ended in the central state and that officials could move on to the next steps of rebuilding.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As central Mexico struggles to recover from devastating floods and landslides, relief efforts are continuing in Southern California--some initiated and supported by those with roots in the stricken states. "The answer to why we help is easy," said 75-year-old Federico Garcia of Hawthorne, who has family in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. "First of all, we are human beings. Second, whenever possible we try to help our brethren, Mexicans in general and Oaxacans in particular."
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | From Reuters
The government softened its stand on accepting foreign aid Wednesday as cloudy skies threatened to bring more rain and misery to survivors of more than a week of flooding and mudslides. The government rushed to clarify its position on foreign aid after President Ernesto Zedillo indicated earlier this week that Mexico did not need outside help in dealing with the natural disaster that has hit nine states, killed hundreds and driven more than 200,000 from their homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1999
Given what they said was a green light by Mexico, relief workers on Wednesday began efforts to aid victims of flooding there. Operation USA announced it had begun collecting medical supplies and other aid that will be shipped to flood victims in southern Mexico. "We've been waiting, and finally got the OK from Mexico that they will accept medical supplies and other forms of relief," said Richard Walden of Operation USA.
NEWS
October 9, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soldiers and volunteers dug out dozens of corpses from hip-deep mud Friday and authorities ferried aid to stranded towns as Mexico began cleaning up from massive floods that have killed more than 250 people in a broad central swath of the country. "I think, unfortunately, this could be the tragedy of the decade for Mexico in terms of loss of life," President Ernesto Zedillo said after flying over the disaster area.
NEWS
June 26, 1999 | Times Wire Services
Three days of torrential rains from a tropical depression have triggered landslides and sent rivers over their banks in southwestern Mexico, killing at least two people and forcing hundreds to flee their homes, officials said Friday. Both deaths occurred Thursday in the state of Oaxaca. Francisca Ordonez, 29, drowned late Thursday when she fell into an overflowing river, state officials told local television.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ernesto Zedillo acknowledged Monday that many Mexican villages were still desperate for food nearly a week after being devastated by floods, but he chastised politicians who have criticized the government relief effort. "It's simply not fair to take advantage of this tragedy to gain space in a newspaper or TV or radio news show," declared the president, who then donned a red slicker and sloshed through the muddy remains of a shattered neighborhood in Puebla state.
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The death toll from a week of devastating floods in Mexico topped 320 Saturday as rescue workers pressed on with the grim task of digging out people buried when a mudslide engulfed an entire village. The extent of what President Ernesto Zedillo called the "tragedy of the decade" was becoming starkly clear as the rains eased and rescue workers were able to reach villages that had been cut off for days.
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