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Floods Mozambique

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NEWS
February 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Rescuers plucked thousands of people from trees and rooftops Monday, but many others were forced to spend another night on precarious perches above rising flood waters in this impoverished southeast African nation. Officials say thousands have died in the deluge. Maj. Louis Kirsten, a spokesman for the South African military, said helicopters rescued more than 3,000 people Monday, including everyone in immediate danger along a particularly hard-hit stretch of the Limpopo River.
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NEWS
March 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Mozambique's sole military helicopter battled to pluck families from rising flood waters as the government announced that the death toll had increased to 52 in the second deluge to hit the country in a year. Men waded through waist-deep water to put their children aboard the helicopter hovering over the Zambezi River flood plain near Caia in central Mozambique.
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NEWS
March 2, 2000 |
About 900 U.S. troops will deliver emergency supplies and help rescue flood victims in Mozambique, Clinton administration officials said Wednesday. The Pentagon expects to deliver equipment and supplies within the next several days, White House National Security Council spokesman David Leavy said. Administration officials said the troops were likely to be deployed from Europe.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Flooding in northwestern Mozambique worsened after the floodgates of a major dam on the Zambezi River were opened to relieve pressure on the dam's walls. Low-lying areas of Tete city, the capital of Tete province, flooded after more gates were opened on the Cahora Bassa dam. Tomas Mandlate, governor of the province, said people in the city were panicking.
NEWS
March 4, 2000 |
The water level in the flooded Limpopo River valley dropped unexpectedly Friday, freeing thousands of people who were marooned for days in trees and on rooftops during Mozambique's worst flooding on record. Rescuers have saved more than 12,000 people from the flood waters. But tragedy struck the rescue effort Friday when a boat capsized, drowning four children. And in refugee camps, many people went hungry for yet another day.
NEWS
March 12, 2000 |
Blessed with a full day of sunshine and receding waters, aid groups Saturday stepped up food deliveries to 1 million flood victims in central and southern Mozambique. With previously impassable roads opening, the international relief effort was expected to gain pace. In the largest overland delivery so far, trucks carrying 52 tons of food left the Indian Ocean port of Beira and headed south to the hard-hit city of Save. Aid officials welcomed the rare stretch of sunny skies.
NEWS
March 5, 2000 |
Thousands of Mozambique's hungry and thirsty flood victims straggled into makeshift camps Saturday after days of huddling on rooftops or clinging to tree branches. As more supplies and equipment arrived from around the world--including the first of three U.S. planes carrying boats from Miami--survivors at the camps gulped down cornmeal soup and beans, the first food many had eaten in four or five days.
NEWS
February 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Floods in central Mozambique have displaced 25,000 people, as the country struggles to recover from devastating floods a year ago that killed 700 people. A tropical storm that swept the east African nation late last month dumped nearly 5 inches of rain on the coastal Zambezia province in 24 hours. The new flooding comes at the height of Mozambique's rainy season. At least nine people have died in the flooding, an official said.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | From Reuters
Aid workers reached isolated villages in southern Mozambique on Saturday and found local people eating grass and insect-infested corn to survive after weeks of floods. A U.N. World Food Program spokeswoman said about 2,500 to 3,000 people had been found in four villages 25 miles from the southern town of Chibuto. They had been trapped by flood waters since Feb. 20. "This could be just the tip of the iceberg. The question is, how many people are out there like this?" the U.N.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You have to find your soul to dance flamenco. You also have to develop the authority and technique to play with emotion--which is one of the things that makes young dancers so fascinating to watch when they take on the task seriously. Several caught the eye on Friday night in a program called "Danzas de Espana--The Next Generation," produced by the Fountain Theatre at the Los Angeles Theatre Center downtown. The technical level of dancing was high among the nine young women, ages 10 to 21, most of whom are students of Linda Vega, who choreographed much of the program and also returned to the stage after a three-year hiatus.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You have to find your soul to dance flamenco. You also have to develop the authority and technique to play with emotion--which is one of the things that makes young dancers so fascinating to watch when they take on the task seriously. Several caught the eye on Friday night in a program called "Danzas de Espana--The Next Generation," produced by the Fountain Theatre at the Los Angeles Theatre Center downtown. The technical level of dancing was high among the nine young women, ages 10 to 21, most of whom are students of Linda Vega, who choreographed much of the program and also returned to the stage after a three-year hiatus.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Rescue teams began evacuating 80,000 people threatened by fresh floods in central parts of Mozambique as more water was released from the Cahora Bassa Dam. Silvano Langa, director of the National Institute for Disaster Management, said rescuers had four to five days before a fresh wave of water hits the towns of Marromeu and Luabo downstream from the dam's reservoir, which is at full capacity.
NEWS
February 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Floods in central Mozambique have displaced 25,000 people, as the country struggles to recover from devastating floods a year ago that killed 700 people. A tropical storm that swept the east African nation late last month dumped nearly 5 inches of rain on the coastal Zambezia province in 24 hours. The new flooding comes at the height of Mozambique's rainy season. At least nine people have died in the flooding, an official said.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months ago, after a $130-million rescue and relief effort, helicopters plucked the last survivors from trees and rooftops above Mozambique's flood waters. Then came a less poignant crisis as people began returning from tent cities to their flood-ravaged villages with little aid to start anew. "Without adequate living conditions, those people could be in more danger now than they were on their roofs," Mozambican President Joaquim Chissano said this week.
NEWS
March 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
Desperate flood victims rushed at aid trucks in a Mozambican camp, resulting in chaos that left five people dead and 10 injured, officials said Friday, blaming a poorly organized relief mission. It was unclear whether the victims of Thursday's incident were trampled or run over by one of the aid trucks bringing supplies to the Chiaquelane camp, Foreign Minister Leonardo Simao said. "A crowd came in because everybody wanted to get some [aid].
NEWS
March 25, 2000 | Associated Press
The government will take care of Rositha Pedro, the baby who drew world sympathy when she was born in a tree where her mother took refuge from the country's devastating floods, a newspaper reported Friday. President Joaquim Chissano announced that the state will take the responsibility to ensure that Rositha is educated and supported, the country's main newspaper Noticias reported.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Rescue teams began evacuating 80,000 people threatened by fresh floods in central parts of Mozambique as more water was released from the Cahora Bassa Dam. Silvano Langa, director of the National Institute for Disaster Management, said rescuers had four to five days before a fresh wave of water hits the towns of Marromeu and Luabo downstream from the dam's reservoir, which is at full capacity.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At last count, the names of 150 children spilled across the pages of the camp registry here, the whereabouts of their parents listed as unknown. Narciso Valoyi, 11, is there near the top. No home. No parents. His only sister, just 15, is sick with malaria and battling for her life. Narciso has the fever too. His eyes are swollen and red. He doesn't talk much. Questions bring more tears than words.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | From Reuters
Aid workers reached isolated villages in southern Mozambique on Saturday and found local people eating grass and insect-infested corn to survive after weeks of floods. A U.N. World Food Program spokeswoman said about 2,500 to 3,000 people had been found in four villages 25 miles from the southern town of Chibuto. They had been trapped by flood waters since Feb. 20. "This could be just the tip of the iceberg. The question is, how many people are out there like this?" the U.N.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
With heavy rains forecast and Mozambique's main highways still impassable, the British navy anchored a floating helipad Thursday at the mouth of the swollen Save River to speed food aid to flood victims. From the deck of the Ft. George, five British helicopters will deliver food to 45,000 hungry flood victims near the central town of Machanga, said Lindsey Davies, a spokeswoman for the World Food Program, a U.N. agency.
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