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Floods Netherlands

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NEWS
February 3, 1995 | Associated Press
Flooded rivers subsided Thursday, but a new enemy gnawed at the weakened, ancient structures that keep much of this country dry: swift currents that threatened to gouge the dikes. The latest problem is not high water but the speed with which river levels are dropping in the southeastern Netherlands. "It's a real danger," regional Dikemaster Jan Boer said. "When the waters decline, when the pressure disappears, there's a chance dikes will begin to float and shift. The whole dike can be torn open."
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NEWS
February 5, 1995 | From Reuters
Dutch roads were choked with cars and trucks Saturday as 55,000 flood evacuees made their way home, but 140,000 people remained in temporary shelters in the Netherlands. The Rhine, meanwhile, resembled a congested autobahn as barges delayed for a week by flooding got back to ferrying their goods along Germany's biggest river. The area around the eastern Dutch city of Nijmegen was declared safe, but downstream areas of the Maas and Waal rivers still faced the threat of weakened dikes collapsing.
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NEWS
February 5, 1995 | From Reuters
Dutch roads were choked with cars and trucks Saturday as 55,000 flood evacuees made their way home, but 140,000 people remained in temporary shelters in the Netherlands. The Rhine, meanwhile, resembled a congested autobahn as barges delayed for a week by flooding got back to ferrying their goods along Germany's biggest river. The area around the eastern Dutch city of Nijmegen was declared safe, but downstream areas of the Maas and Waal rivers still faced the threat of weakened dikes collapsing.
NEWS
February 3, 1995 | Associated Press
Flooded rivers subsided Thursday, but a new enemy gnawed at the weakened, ancient structures that keep much of this country dry: swift currents that threatened to gouge the dikes. The latest problem is not high water but the speed with which river levels are dropping in the southeastern Netherlands. "It's a real danger," regional Dikemaster Jan Boer said. "When the waters decline, when the pressure disappears, there's a chance dikes will begin to float and shift. The whole dike can be torn open."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
People here know better than anyone else that the sea does not give up easily. That fact was pummeled into their national conscience in 1953 when raging storm waters swept across their tiny country, killing nearly 2,000 people, many of whom died of exposure and exhaustion after waiting on rooftops for several nights for rescue crews that got there too late.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emergency crews in five nations Tuesday fought to control some of northern Europe's worst flooding this century as the Dutch government, worried that the country's system of dikes might collapse, launched a mass evacuation of population centers. "The Netherlands tonight faces a total emergency," began the main Dutch national television news Tuesday evening.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emergency crews in five nations Tuesday fought to control some of northern Europe's worst flooding this century as the Dutch government, worried that the country's system of dikes might collapse, launched a mass evacuation of population centers. "The Netherlands tonight faces a total emergency," began the main Dutch national television news Tuesday evening.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
People here know better than anyone else that the sea does not give up easily. That fact was pummeled into their national conscience in 1953 when raging storm waters swept across their tiny country, killing nearly 2,000 people, many of whom died of exposure and exhaustion after waiting on rooftops for several nights for rescue crews that got there too late.
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