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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | From Times Staff Writers
The mother of late Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner filed a wrongful death lawsuit this week against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, in what she said is part of an escalating family dispute over control of the famed runner's legacy.
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January 20, 2013 | Eric Sondheimer
In the 78-year history of high school sports in the Los Angeles Unified School District, the number of Olympians produced, major league players developed and Hall of Fame members inducted from a variety of sports is staggering. So now you can understand how difficult it is to be selected to the Los Angeles City Section Hall of Fame. The second class of 42 recipients has been selected, and it is a who's who of greatness. There are baseball Hall of Fame members Robin Yount (Taft 1973)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI and JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The mother of Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner filed a wrongful death lawsuit this week against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, in what she said is part of an escalating family dispute over control of the famed runner's legacy. The four-page complaint includes few specific allegations other than the charge that Joyner failed to "exercise reasonable care to avoid foreseeable risk of harm" to his wife and that "harmful or offensive touching" caused her death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1999 | JACK LEONARD and DANIEL YI and MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A year after friends and relatives laid to rest Olympic track star Florence Griffith Joyner--eulogized for her devotion to family as much as her athletic prowess--an ugly rift between the sprinter's husband and his in-laws has escalated into a bitter court battle. The family feud went public this week when Griffith Joyner's mother filed a wrongful death lawsuit against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, charging that he played a role in her daughter's sudden death last September.
SPORTS
September 15, 1988 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
There was once a little girl who was always teased by other children. She didn't fix her hair like anyone else. Her clothes were odd. She wore mismatched socks. They laughed at her. They laughed at the furniture in the little girl's house. They made fun of the way she talked. They laughed at her pet snake and the way she rode to the store on a unicycle, or walked on her hands. They laughed at her because she was different. The little girl knew the other children were laughing at her.
SPORTS
September 22, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
Al Joyner insisted it was love at first sight when he met Florence Griffith during the 1980 Olympic trials. Upon returning to Arkansas State, he called sister Jackie in Los Angeles, where she was a training partner of Florence's, and said, "I'm going to get that Florence Griffith." Jackie laughed. She couldn't imagine her gangly, late-blooming older brother beside a woman with leading-lady looks. Al was undeterred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1999 | JACK LEONARD and DANIEL YI and MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A year after friends and relatives laid to rest Olympic track star Florence Griffith Joyner--eulogized for her devotion to family as much as her athletic prowess--an ugly rift between the sprinter's husband and his in-laws has escalated into a bitter court battle. The family feud went public this week when Griffith Joyner's mother filed a wrongful death lawsuit against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, charging that he played a role in her daughter's sudden death last September.
SPORTS
October 1, 1988 | Mike Downey
Women of the world should be able to do anything they please, but, if there are no objections, they all could do us a really big favor. There is one matter on which they should come to an agreement, maybe take a vote at the next National Organization for Women meeting or something. Maiden names. By the next Olympics, we need to get this surname business straightened out. Women's last names keep changing and changing. We dim men who follow them around, we can hardly keep up.
SPORTS
July 20, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Nearly all that most people who follow track and field knew about Florence Griffith-Joyner before the U.S. Olympic trials started last week was that she used to have 4-inch fingernails and she is married to Al Joyner, who won the gold medal in the triple jump four years ago at Los Angeles. That's all it says in her biography that's included in the 1988 International Track & Field Annual. "Formerly had 4-inch fingernails on her left hand! Married Al Joyner in October, 1987."
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | From Times Staff Writers
The mother of late Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner filed a wrongful death lawsuit this week against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, in what she said is part of an escalating family dispute over control of the famed runner's legacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI and JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The mother of Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner filed a wrongful death lawsuit this week against her son-in-law, Al Joyner, in what she said is part of an escalating family dispute over control of the famed runner's legacy. The four-page complaint includes few specific allegations other than the charge that Joyner failed to "exercise reasonable care to avoid foreseeable risk of harm" to his wife and that "harmful or offensive touching" caused her death.
SPORTS
July 25, 1999
If fame is catching, then sprinter Angela Williams should eventually be one of the best. The 19-year-old Williams, one of the youngest members of the U.S. track and field team at the Pan American Games, has received advice and inspiration from three of the sport's greatest women athletes--Florence Griffith Joyner, Jackie Joyner-Kersee and Gail Devers. The first brush with the late FloJo came in 1992, when Williams was 12 and already showing signs of her natural speed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1999
For just a moment, they were whole again: Al, Mary and Florence. Together. Exactly eight months to the day after Al Joyner and his daughter Mary awoke to find Florence Griffith Joyner had passed away in her sleep, Al and Mary were on hand Friday in Laguna Hills to unveil a bronze statue of the woman the world knew and loved as Flo-Jo.
NEWS
September 27, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic track star Florence Griffith Joyner was eulogized Saturday as a woman of great stamina and style who astonished countless young athletes with her speed, and inspired her family with her grace and faith. "She just ran and ran and ran. She ran spectacular races," her former coach, Bob Kersee, told 1,500 mourners as he stood beneath an Olympic flag at Saddleback Community Church. "What was in her heart, every time she laced up her spikes, was Jesus. "God is her coach now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
Many remembered her as a child of the Watts projects, a little girl called Dee Dee, a dynamo who was always running, never seemed to get tired and had a fierce determination to win every race, whether it was on the schoolyard, in the streets or on a track. They remembered Florence Griffith Joyner at a candlelight vigil Tuesday night in South-Central Los Angeles, and paid tribute to a athlete who died too young.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1999
For just a moment, they were whole again: Al, Mary and Florence. Together. Exactly eight months to the day after Al Joyner and his daughter Mary awoke to find Florence Griffith Joyner had passed away in her sleep, Al and Mary were on hand Friday in Laguna Hills to unveil a bronze statue of the woman the world knew and loved as Flo-Jo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic track champion Florence Griffith Joyner was eulogized Saturday as a woman of great stamina and style who motivated countless young athletes with her speed and inspired her family with her grace and faith. "She just ran, and ran, and ran. She ran spectacular races," her former coach, Bob Kersee, told the crowd of 1,500 as he stood beneath an Olympic flag at Saddleback Community Church. "What was in her heart, every time she laced up her spikes, was Jesus." He added: "God is her coach now.
SPORTS
September 22, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
Al Joyner insisted it was love at first sight when he met Florence Griffith during the 1980 Olympic trials. Upon returning to Arkansas State, he called sister Jackie in Los Angeles, where she was a training partner of Florence's, and said, "I'm going to get that Florence Griffith." Jackie laughed. She couldn't imagine her gangly, late-blooming older brother beside a woman with leading-lady looks. Al was undeterred.
SPORTS
October 1, 1988 | Mike Downey
Women of the world should be able to do anything they please, but, if there are no objections, they all could do us a really big favor. There is one matter on which they should come to an agreement, maybe take a vote at the next National Organization for Women meeting or something. Maiden names. By the next Olympics, we need to get this surname business straightened out. Women's last names keep changing and changing. We dim men who follow them around, we can hardly keep up.
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